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Learn Polish: YouTube Channels to Improve Your Skills

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Studying a second language can be a rewarding experience, but we know that the learning process can be downright boring at times! 

Textbooks, audio lessons, and flashcards are all excellent methods for studying a language. But did you know that as you learn Polish, YouTube can be a great supplementary resource?

The only problem is that if you search for Polish YouTube channels, you’re going to find a wide variety of them, each one promising to help you learn Polish in no time. But not all of them are valuable, and no one YouTube channel can replace a structured course of study.

On PolishPod101.com, you can go through a tailor-made study path that will help you make fast progress by covering the most important topics. In addition to the countless lessons available on the platform, we also run a YouTube channel to give you even more opportunities to improve your Polish skills. 

The PolishPod101 YouTube channel offers you specific advice on topics that many learners struggle with. Because our hosts are native Polish speakers, watching our videos will give you even more exposure to how the language is spoken in real life. Simply put, it’s the perfect complement to our platform. 

We know that our resources are amazing, but if you want to speed up your progress even more, you can add additional channels to your learning curriculum. 

Before you start with our list of the top Polish YouTube channels for learners, remember to check out our Polish word list “Talking About YouTube.”

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Polish Table of Contents
  1. Polski z Anią
  2. Smerfy • Po Polsku
  3. Foreigners in Poland
  4. Chido-Fajny
  5. Audycje Radiowe
  6. Arlena Witt
  7. Mówiąc Inaczej
  8. Koreanka
  9. The PolishPod101 YouTube Channel
  10. Final Thoughts

1. Polski z Anią

A Teacher with a Whiteboard

Polski z Anią is one of the best YouTube channels for learning Polish. It’s run by Ania, an assistant professor at the Polonicum Centre of Polish Language and Culture for Foreigners. She explains Polish grammar in plain language that’s easy to understand, and her explanation of cases is spot-on. She has already helped many YouTube users.

Ania speaks Polish clearly and there are English subtitles for people who don’t speak Polish very well yet. There are two seasons available so far, with insightful explanations that cover many different levels while remaining relevant for learners at any level.


2. Smerfy • Po Polsku


A Comic/cartoon Related Image

Category: Cartoon
Level: Beginner – Intermediate

Children from all around the world adore the Smurfs. Like in many cartoons, the stories presented are easy to follow, which makes them a great tool for language learning. In the Polish version of this beloved cartoon, the Smurfs speak slowly and their elocution leaves nothing to be desired. 

There’s not much talking in most episodes and the focus is on the action. This means that learners can enjoy a lot of the story from the context, and then easily rewind to listen to particular phrases. The Smurfs also use everyday vocabulary, which is great for emerging Polish speakers. Are you ready to be a kid again? Smerfastycznie! (“Smurftastic!”)

By the way, did you know that children in Poland have their own special holiday? Click on the link to find out all you need to know about Children’s Day.


3. Foreigners in Poland


A Polish Flag in a Speech Bubble

Category: Language Learning
Level: Any

Unfortunately, this channel is no longer active. It has a small collection of videos with Polish vocabulary for everyday situations. You can learn Polish food vocabulary, expressions for ordering in a restaurant, how to ask for directions, and other useful things. 

This channel is appropriate for learners at any level, as the hosts mainly speak in English; when Polish is spoken, there are subtitles in both Polish and English.


4. Chido-Fajny


Polish Food

Category: A Foreigner Living in Poland
Level: Any

Chido-Fajny’s channel includes many videos to help learners with the Polish language, some of which cover more specific topics such as the differences between Spanish or Polish and specific language learning tools. You can find these videos on his playlists entitled “Learn Polish” and “Aprende Polaco.”

This Polish language YouTube channel is more than just another language learning resource. There are also many funny videos with foreigners trying to pronounce challenging Polish words, as well as videos about places in Poland and Polish traditions. Most videos are available in English, but there are also some recorded in Spanish. If you’re interested in Polish food in particular, remember to check out our lesson 10 Polish Foods.


5. Audycje Radiowe


Radio

Category: Polish History and Culture
Level: Intermediate – Advanced

If you’re looking to learn Polish on YouTube, but none of the other channels on this list seem challenging enough, such gems as Audycje Radiowe (“Radio Auditions”) will be invaluable to you. 

This channel features many great recordings from the Polish radio, and is great for language learners as they can play and stop the videos as needed (which one can’t do when an audition is being broadcast on the radio). 

Learners can not only work on their Polish skills, but also improve their understanding of Polish history and culture. The playlist “Sensacje XX wieku” is particularly good for language learning, as it has links to transcripts. Reading along with the material you’re listening to can greatly improve your comprehension, and it makes working with the recorded material much easier. 

Are you a history buff? You can learn even more about Polish history in our lesson Learn Your Polish History

6. Arlena Witt


A Person Writing English Sentences on the Blackboard

Category: Language Learning
Level: Intermediate – Advanced

Arlena Witt teaches Polish people English…but we still consider this one of the top channels for learning Polish on YouTube. Each video is recorded in Polish and has Polish subtitles, so intermediate level learners should be able to follow what she’s saying. She speaks relatively fast, but clearly. 

How can this channel help you learn Polish? By exposing you to the Polish language and giving you Polish equivalents of English terms. Additionally, she gives general language learning tips that are useful regardless of the language you’re trying to learn.


7. Mówiąc Inaczej


YouTube Button

Category: Language Learning
Level: Intermediate – Advanced

This is one of the most common YouTube channels to learn Polish, used by…Polish people! Even native speakers have things left to learn in their own language. Just think how many native English speakers don’t know the difference between “it’s” and “its”!

Paulina helps people improve their Polish when it comes to common problems in this language. The issues that native speakers encounter are common among language learners, too. In other words, there’s plenty for you to learn from this channel.

These are some of the more challenging Polish lessons YouTube has to offer, since they’re designed for native speakers. The channel is almost entirely in Polish and there are no subtitles. If you’re at the intermediate level and like challenges, it’s worth giving it a go.


8. Koreanka


A Woman Smiling with a Korean Flag in Her Hand

Category: A Foreigner Living in Poland
Level: Intermediate

Do you want to learn real Polish with YouTube, from a foreigner’s perspective? Koreanka (“Korean woman”) lives in Poland, her channel is recorded in Polish, and she often invites other foreigners as guests. She records videos about her life in Poland, everything Polish, and her Korean roots. There are subtitles for those who need them.

This isn’t your typical Polish language YouTube channel, but it can serve as great encouragement for you. What could be more inspirational than hearing a foreigner speak fluent Polish?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cg5v9HTQU7A

9. The PolishPod101 YouTube Channel


PolishPod101 Logo

Category: Language Learning
Level: Any

Learn Polish with PolishPod101.com

YouTube offers countless opportunities for Polish learners, as you’ve seen. But there’s nothing better for truly learning a language than a well-structured course like the ones offered by PolishPod101. Our YouTube channel goes hand in hand with our website.

If you’re enjoying our audio content, you’re going to love the PolishPod101 YouTube channel. There, you’ll find even more useful tips on learning Polish and lots of handy vocabulary. What’s more? You can count on extended listening comprehension practice and informative videos about Polish culture. Check it out!


10. Final Thoughts

We hope that our guide to the top Polish YouTube channels for learners has been useful to you, and that you’ve found the best resources to take your Polish to the next level. Let us know in the comments which channel is your favorite! Or, tell us why the PolishPod101 YouTube channel is your favorite. 

Learning a language is an amazing journey that’s much easier with someone to help you. By joining a platform like PolishPod101, you get exactly that. Start your free trial today to enjoy hundreds of recordings from native speakers, vocabulary lists, and more. 

We hope to see you around!

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How to Say Goodbye in Polish in Every Situation

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Like saying hello, saying goodbye is an important part of being polite. These are the most basic skills you need to have a conversation in any language, so it’s crucial that you acquire them early on. 

In this article, we’ll tell you how to say goodbye in Polish in a variety of situations. For example, you’ll learn the best parting words for formal versus informal environments, how to see someone off at the airport, and how to end a phone conversation. By the time you’ve finished reading, you’ll have the perfect Polish goodbye for any situation you find yourself in. Are you ready to get your Polish up to scratch? Start with a bonus, and download the Must-Know Beginner Vocabulary PDF for FREE!(Logged-In Member Only)

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Polish Table of Contents
  1. The Most Common Ways of Saying Goodbye
  2. Specific Ways of Saying Goodbye in Polish
  3. Final Thoughts

1. The Most Common Ways of Saying Goodbye

Most Common Goodbyes

Before we look into the more specific ways of saying goodbye in Polish, let’s discuss the simplest ways to do so. Remember that you should address people differently depending on whether the situation is formal or informal. 

Formal verb forms use the third person singular and the words Pan (“Mister”) and Pani (“Ma’am”). For example, to ask “What’s your name?” in a formal manner, you would say: Jak ma Pan/Pani na imię? 

The informal verb forms use the second person singular. To ask “What’s your name?” in an informal manner, you would say: Jak masz na imię? 

So how do these rules apply to Polish goodbye phrases? Let’s find out!

A- Goodbye in Polish (Informal)

A Person Waving Goodbye

The most common informal way of saying bye in Polish is: Cześć! Note that this word is also used for saying hello. (If you want to learn more about this topic, you can check out our lesson “Saying Hello No Matter the Time of Day in Polish.”)

Cześć is very versatile, and you can use it to say goodbye when you’re leaving any informal situation. We also use a variation: No to cześć!

Both Cześć! and No to cześć! are used with either the nominative case (mianownik) or the vocative case (wołacz):

  • Cześć, Ania! – “Bye, Ania!” (nominative, mianownik)
  • Cześć, Aniu! – “Bye, Ania!” (vocative, wołacz)

B- Goodbye in Polish (Formal)

The most common formal goodbye in Polish is: Do widzenia! This phrase is used in all kinds of formal situations, such as when you’re leaving a corner shop, post office, or doctor’s office. It’s often accompanied by Dziękuję! (“Thank you!“) if a service was provided:

  • Oto Pani/Pańska reszta. – “Here’s your change.” (to a man and a woman, respectively)
  • Dziękuję, do widzenia. – “Thank you. Goodbye!”

We can also say Dobranoc Panu/Pani to wish someone a good night’s rest. 

Practice your pronunciation of Do widzenia! whenever you can. Try to use this phrase in real life, even if the rest of your conversation is in English. Practice makes perfect!

2. Specific Ways of Saying Goodbye in Polish

There are many Polish language goodbyes that you can use in more specific situations. 

When you’re formal with someone, you simply don’t have certain conversations with them. This is why Do widzenia! is your go-to goodbye in formal contexts. 

Keep reading to find out how to say goodbye in Polish when the situation is informal! 

A- Alternative Ways to Say Bye in Polish

Apart from simply saying Cześć! when you’re leaving a group of friends, you can also say: 

  • Na razie!
  • Nara! 
  • Narka!

Each of the phrases above is equivalent to “Bye for now” in Polish. Here are a few more ways to say bye in Polish:

  • Pa pa!
  • Pa
  • No to pa!

Two People Air Kissing

Make sure to memorize these expressions, as they’re very often used when speaking informally. 

B- See You Later!

There are a couple of ways to say “See you” in Polish:

  • Do zobaczenia! 
  • Do zo! 

“See you later!” is Do zobaczenia później! You should only use this phrase, though, when you’re going to actually see that person later (for instance, later that day). In certain English-speaking countries, people say “See you later!” as a general farewell expression. But this is not a convention in Poland, and it’d confuse the person you say it to.

If you know when you’ll see that person next, you can say: 

  • Do zobaczenia jutro! (“See you tomorrow!”)
  • Do zobaczenia w/we [day of the week]! (“See you on [day of the week]!”) 
  • Do zobaczenia w poniedziałek! (“See you on Monday!”)
  • Do zobaczenia we wtorek! (“See you on Tuesday!”)

You can also use this sentence pattern with different times of day:

  • Do zobaczenia wieczorem! (“See you in the evening!”)
  • Do zobaczenia rano! (“See you in the morning!”)

As you can see, there are many ways to say goodbye in Polish. The more you study them, the more comfortable you’ll be having a conversation in Polish. 

C- Seeing Someone Off

How do you say goodbye in Polish when you’re taking someone to the airport or a train station, where they’re about to start a long journey? Of course, you say Do zobaczenia! But there are other things that you can add, such as:

  • Trzymaj się! (“Take care!”)
  • Uważaj na siebie! (“Be careful!”)
  • Szerokiej drogi! (“Have a good/safe trip!”) (Literally: “Have a wide road!”)
  • Napisz wiadomość jak dojedziesz! (“Text me a message when you arrive!”)
  • Zadzwoń jak dojedziesz! (“Call me when you arrive!”)
A Person with a Suitcase

Parents who are seeing their children off may say something like: 

  • Nie szalej! / Tylko bez szaleństw! (“Don’t go crazy!”)

D- When You Need to Excuse Yourself

Sometimes you need to leave the party before everyone else. Here are some phrases you can use to let your hosts know you have to get going

  • [Naprawdę] muszę lecieć! (“I [really] need to go!”)
  • Będę się zbierać. (“I’ll be off!”)
  • Niestety nie mogę dłużej zostać. (“Unfortunately, I can’t stay any longer.”)
  • Pora na mnie! (“It’s time for me to go.”) [Literally: “It’s time for me.”]

If you’ve bumped into someone you know on the street, but don’t have time for a conversation, you can say: 

  • Miło się gada, ale muszę lecieć! (“It’s nice chatting with you, but I have to go!”)
  • Miło się gada, ale jestem już spóźniony/spóźniona! (“It’s nice chatting with you, but I’m already late!”) [for a male and female, respectively]

E- Polish Goodbye Phrases for Phone Conversations

Politely ending a phone call in Polish is easy: 

  • Do usłyszenia! (“Chat soon!”) [Literally: “Until we hear one another again!”]
  • No to do usłyszenia! (“Chat soon, then!”) [Literally: “Until we hear one another again, then!”]

A Person Talking on the Phone, Looking at Her Watch

You can also add a specific time reference to let the other person know when you’ll talk with them again:

  • Do usłyszenia jutro! (“I’ll speak to you tomorrow!”)
  • Do usłyszenia w przyszłym tygodniu! (“I’ll speak to you next week!”)

Do you have a cell phone? Learn all you need to know about Polish manners on the phone with PolishPod101.com. 

F- Saying Goodbye in a Text Message

When you’re texting with someone and you’ve set an appointment to meet with them, you can use one of the expressions we’ve already covered in this article:

  • Do zobaczenia!
  • Do zobaczenia niedługo!
  • Do zo!

You’d probably agree that knowing how to text is an important skill in the modern world. Boost your Polish technology vocab with our lesson. 

G- Saying Goodbye to Someone Who’s Sick

When you bid farewell to someone who’s sick at home or at a hospital, it’s good manners to wish them good health. Here’s how you can do this in Polish: 

  • Wracaj do zdrowia! (“Get better soon!”) 
  • Szybkiego powrotu do zdrowia! (“I’m wishing you a speedy recovery!”)
  • Mam nadzieję, że szybko wydobrzejesz. (“I hope you’ll get better soon.”)

To say goodbye, simply add one of the other phrases you’ve already learned, such as: Do zobaczenia!

Speaking of health, do you know how to talk about health concerns and explain your allergies in Polish? Also, if you’re moving to Poland, you may want to learn more about the Polish healthcare system.

Doctors with a Patient

H- Wishing Someone Good Luck

We all need a little luck sometimes, but there are life situations that call for it more than others. Such situations include taking an exam, going to a job interview, or performing in front of an audience. If you’re parting ways with someone who’s about to do something major, you can say:

  • Powodzenia! (“Good luck!”)
  • Połamania nóg! (“Break a leg!”)
  • Trzymam kciuki! (“Fingers crossed!”)

You’re likely to hear these phrases if you study or work in Poland. Some Polish people are superstitious, though, so not everyone is going to thank you for wishing them luck. It’s believed that doing so may actually bring bad luck. In this case, you may hear the reply: 

  • Nie dziękuję! (“I’m not thanking you.”)


A Person Who Got an A+

3. Final Thoughts

By now, you definitely have a better idea of how to say goodbye in Polish in a variety of contexts. 

Remember to use these expressions whenever you can. Even if it’s the only thing you’ll say in Polish during a conversation, it’s still better than speaking only in English! 

Which way of saying goodbye do you like the most? Let us know in the comments before you go. 

Saying goodbye is an important skill, but on its own, it’s not enough for a smooth conversation. To boost your Polish speaking and comprehension skills, get your free account with PolishPod101 today. 

Our website gives you access to countless language lessons and resources. Our recordings by native speakers will help you get the hang of Polish pronunciation in no time. You can also access your account whenever and wherever you want, thanks to our mobile apps. 

Would you like to know more about our teaching methods? Check out our lessons and methodology page to find out more. 

Happy Polish learning!

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Polish Sentence Structure: Master the Word Order in Polish

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The Polish sentence structure is one of the most important things to study at the beginning of your language-learning journey. Constructing sentences in Polish is easy when you know the rules. So, are you ready to master the Polish word order?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Polish Table of Contents
  1. Polish Word Order: Overview
  2. Polish Word Order Rules: SVO
  3. Word Order with Adverbs
  4. Polish Word Order with Modifiers
  5. Check Your Understanding: Translation Exercise
  6. Final Thoughts

1. Polish Word Order: Overview 

Improve Pronunciation

Let’s start with the basics: the Polish sentence structure for beginners. 

The basic word order in Polish is the so-called SVO, which means that the subject comes first, followed by the verb and the object (if there is an object). 


The word order in Polish isn’t fixed, but the SVO is a very common sentence structure. Polish allows for considerable creativity, particularly for the sake of emphasis. Having said that, using the SVO structure should come naturally to you as an English speaker, so try to stick to it in the beginning.

2. Polish Word Order Rules: SVO

A Grammar-related Picture with Subject and Object Words

As we said before, the Polish word order looks like this: 

subject + verb + (object) = SV(O)

The subject in a sentence is simply the doer of an activity, which is expressed by the verb. The object is the part of a sentence that’s affected by the verb. Like in English, an object isn’t always required in Polish sentences. 

Personal pronouns are dropped in Polish when it’s clear who the “doer” is. This means that a simple sentence in Polish could consist of only a verb. For example: 

  • Czytam

“I’m reading.”

Most sentences, for obvious reasons, are more complicated than that: 

  • Czytam (v) gazetę (o)

“I’m reading a newspaper.”

To emphasize the “doer,” you can also say: 

  • Ja (s) czytam (v) gazetę (o)

“I’m reading a newspaper.”

The form of the verb czytać (“to read”) indicates that the subject is the first person singular, so it’s not really necessary to use a personal pronoun here.

Also note that Polish doesn’t have the simple or continuous aspects. This means that the same verb form is used to express both. For example: 

Czytam (v) gazetę (o). This sentence can be translated as “I’m reading a newspaper,” or “I read a newspaper.”

The meaning is derived from the context.

1- Emphasis and Word Order

From time to time, people change the word order in spoken Polish to stress a different part of the sentence: 

  • (Ja) gazetę czytam

“I’m reading a newspaper.”

This sentence stresses the fact that I’m reading a newspaper and not something else. Please remember that it’s not necessary to use a personal pronoun. When it’s there, it’s read as emphasis: It’s I (and not somebody else) who’s reading the newspaper. 

2- Different Kinds of Sentences

A Person with Exclamation Marks and a Question Mark above Her Head

The Polish sentence structure remains the same for different types of sentences, such as affirmation and negation

Affirmation

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) gazetę (o)

“I’m reading a newspaper.”

Negation

  • (Ja) (s) nie czytam (v) gazety (o)

“I’m not reading a newspaper.”

Nie, used for negation, always directly precedes the verb. 

Exclamatory sentences

  • Czytaj (v) gazetę (o)! 

“Read a newspaper!”

The subject is missing in this example, as it wouldn’t sound natural. 

Questions

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) gazetę (o)

“Am I reading a newspaper?”

Polish questions in spoken language are usually indicated by a rising tone. Sometimes in spoken Polish, and as a rule in written Polish, we add czy:

  • Czy (ja) (s) czytam (v) gazetę (o)?

“Am I reading a newspaper?”

Czy doesn’t translate well into English as its meaning depends on the context. Have a look at the examples below:

  • Czy czytałeś gazetę? 

Were you reading a newspaper?” 

  • Czy przeczytasz gazetę? 

Will you read a newspaper?”

  • Czy on czyta gazetę? 

Does he read a newspaper?”

Remember to simply add czy in front of a sentence to form a question when you’re writing.

Now that we’ve covered the basic word order in Polish for simple sentences, let’s move on to discuss more complex ones. 

3. Word Order with Adverbs 

A Man Reading a Newspaper

In Polish language word order, we usually place adverbs before the verb they modify. Here’s a number of examples for this Polish sentence structure: 

  • (Ja) (s) szybko (a) czytam (v). 

“I read fast.”

Adverbs of manner, such as szybko (“fast”) and wolno (“slowly”), are placed in front of the verb. Would you like to learn some more adverbs? Check out our article, where you can find over 100 of them. 

  • (Ja) (s) codziennie (a) czytam (v) gazetę (o). 

“I read a newspaper every day.”

Adverbs of time and frequency are also placed after the subject, but in front of the verb, if the sentence is a full SVO in Polish. To practice adverbs of frequency, go to our lesson titled “How often do you go to the gym in Poland?

  • (Ja) czytam (v) gazetę (o) w domu

“I read a newspaper at home.”

  • (Ja) (s) w domu (a) czytam (v) gazetę (o). 

“I read a newspaper at home.”

Adverbs of place are often placed toward the end of the sentence. 

1- Change of Placement for Emphasis

The only time we’d change the structure is, yet again, for emphasis: 

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) szybko (a). 

“I read fast.”

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) gazetę (o) codziennie

“I read a newspaper every day.”

  • (Ja) (s) w domu (a) czytam (v) gazetę (o). 

“I read a newspaper at home.”

4. Polish Word Order with Modifiers

Improve Listening

Modifiers usually modify nouns, and are placed in front of them. Modifiers include adjectives, determiners, numerals, and relative clauses. Relative clauses are an exception as they’re placed after nouns. 

1- Placement of Adjectives

Adjectives describe qualities of nouns, like in the example below: 

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) ciekawą (adj) gazetę (o)

“I’m reading an interesting newspaper.”

As you can see above, the adjective breaks up the (S)VO structure, creating (S)VADJO. Have a look at some more examples: 

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) starą (adj) gazetę (o)

“I’m reading an old newspaper.”

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) lokalną (adj) gazetę (o)

“I’m reading a local newspaper.”

Do you want to learn more adjectives in Polish? Check out this list of high-frequency adjectives

2- Determiners and Their Placement

A Newspaper

A determiner lets you know which noun you’re talking about. Here’s an example of a determiner: 

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) (det) gazetę (o)

“I’m reading this newspaper.”

Polish determiners also include: 

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) tamtą (det) gazetę (o)

“I’m reading that newspaper.”

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) tamte (det) gazety (o)

“I’m reading those newspapers.”

3- Polish Word Order with Numerals

“Numerals” is a fancy word for numbers. Just like other modifiers, they’re placed in front of the noun:

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) jedną (num) gazetę (o)

“I read one newspaper.”

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) dwie (num) gazety (o)

“I read two newspapers.”

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) trzy (num) gazety (o)

“I read three newspapers.”

The pattern remains the same for all numerals. Do you know numbers in Polish well? If not, consult these pages: 

4- Polish Word Order Rules for Relative Clauses

A relative clause is an additional way to identify a noun. They’re an exception among modifiers, placed after the noun. Here’s a number of examples for Polish:

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) gazetę (o), którą lubię

“I’m reading a newspaper that I like.”

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) gazetę (o), którą mi poleciłeś

“I’m reading a newspaper that you’ve recommended to me.”

  • (Ja) (s) czytam (v) gazetę (o), której nie znajdziesz w wielu sklepach

“I’m reading a newspaper that you won’t find in many shops.”

The main difference between the word order in Polish vs. English for relative clauses is that Polish rarely uses non-defining relative clauses. For example: 

“My mom, whom I love deeply, lives in England.” 

A Heart

The direct translation is Moja mama, którą bardzo kocham, mieszka w Anglii, which is correct but not natural in Polish. A native speaker would be more likely to use two separate sentences to express the same idea. 

Have you noticed that relative clauses are preceded by a comma in Polish? You can learn more about Polish punctuation in the Wikipedia entry on Polish orthography

5. Check Your Understanding: Translation Exercise

Reading an article is one thing, and making sure that you understand it and can use what you’ve learned is another. This is why we’ve prepared a translation exercise for you. It will help you remember what you’ve read. Remember: practice makes perfect!

Step 1 

Translate the sentence “I eat a sandwich,” to Polish. Mark the subject, the verb, and the object. Are all parts of the sentence necessary or can you omit some? If you’re not sure, read the section Polish Word Order Rules: SVO again.

Step 2

Form a question with czy from the sentence “I eat a sandwich.”

Step 3

Add the adverb teraz (“now”) to the sentence “I eat a sandwich.”

Step 4

Add the adjective smaczną (“delicious”) in the correct form to the sentence “I eat a sandwich.” Speaking of delicious food, you should learn about the top 5 Polish dishes

Step 5

Include the determiner (“this”) to the sentence “I eat a sandwich.”

Step 6

Make the sentence “I eat a sandwich,” more specific by including the numeral jedną (“one”).

Step 7

Expand the sentence “I eat a sandwich,” by adding the relative clause którą mi kupiłeś (“that you’ve bought for me”). Don’t forget about the comma. 

A Person-shaped Figure Showing Thumbs Up with a Green Tick in Front of Them

How did it go? Was it difficult? Let us know in the comments section. 

6. Final Thoughts

Today you’ve learned a very important thing, and now you know how to form simple and more complicated sentences in Polish. You can also see the differences between the Polish vs. English sentence structures. Take your time to learn about the word order in Polish grammar, as it’s something you’ll have to build on in order to speak Polish well. 

Knowing the basic word order in Polish isn’t enough to become a fluent speaker, though. You’ll need more than that to master the language. Fortunately, PolishPod101 has everything you need! Create your lifetime account today and get access to countless audio and video lessons with native speakers. 

Remember to let us know about the results of your translation exercise before you go. 

Happy learning!

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Useful Polish Phrases: Compliments for Every Occasion

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Among useful Polish phrases, compliments are particularly handy in social situations. Giving a compliment can make you feel good, and also bring joy to the lives of others. What are the best Polish compliments, though? Keep reading and you’ll learn how to compliment people in Polish in any situation.

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Table of Contents

  1. Complimenting Someone’s Appearance
  2. Praising Someone in Polish for Their Work
  3. Complimenting Someone on Their Skills
  4. Making Compliments Sound More Sincere
  5. What to Expect After You Give a Compliment
  6. Final Thoughts

1. Complimenting Someone’s Appearance

A Pageant Queen

We all compliment someone’s appearance from time to time. And yet, sometimes people may feel offended by certain remarks.

The easiest way to avoid making someone feel uncomfortable is to consider the context before complimenting them. Shouting “You are beautiful!” in Polish (Jesteś piękna!) to a woman or “You’re handsome!” (Jesteś przystojny!) to a man on the street is an example of bad manners. In fact, catcalling is a form of street harassment.

Similarly, commenting on someone’s appearance is often inappropriate in professional contexts, such as a job interview or a shareholder meeting.

You should save such compliments for positive acquaintances, friends, and family.

1- Polish Compliments to a Girl or Woman

There’s a number of lovely Polish compliments to a girl or woman you can use. Here are some compliments in Polish for women of any age:

A- Hair

  • Bardzo ładnie ci w tych włosach! (“This hairstyle looks great on you!”)
  • Masz bardzo zadbane włosy. (“Your hair is in great shape!”)
  • Bardzo fajna fryzura! (“What a cool haircut!”)
  • Super cięcie! (“Great haircut!”)

B- Outfit

  • Ale śliczna sukienka! (“What a lovely dress!”)
  • Fajna stylówka! (“Cool style!”)
  • Do twarzy ci w tym kolorze! (“This color suits you!”)
  • Ekstra/super bluzka! (“I love your shirt!”)
  • Podoba mi się twoja torebka. (“I like your handbag.”)
  • Gdzie kupiłaś ten sweter? Jest przepiękny! (“Where did you buy this sweater? It’s gorgeous!”)

Learn more words for clothes in Polish to expand your complimenting abilities!

C- Smile

  • Masz bardzo ładny uśmiech. (“You have a very pretty smile.”)
  • Pięknie się uśmiechasz. (“You smile beautifully.”)

D- General compliments on appearance

  • Jesteś najpiękniejszą kobietą, jaką kiedykolwiek widziałem. (“You’re the most beautiful woman I’ve ever seen.”)

This phrase can be said to a woman by a man in a romantic context. If a woman wanted to say it, the form of the verb widzieć (“to see”) would change to widziałam.

  • Świetnie/Super/Ekstra wyglądasz! (“You look great!”)

We could compliment a man in the same way.

  • Macierzyństwo ci służy! (“Motherhood suits you!”)

The literal meaning is closer to: “Motherhood serves you well!”) It’s a Polish compliment specifically for women who’ve become mothers.

  • Z roku na rok wyglądasz coraz lepiej! (“You look better every year!”)

This phrase is stereotypically considered one of the top Polish compliments for a girl or woman.

  • Zżera mnie zazdrość jak na ciebie patrzę. (“I’m green with envy when I look at you.”)

This is a compliment in Polish told by a woman to a woman.

2- Polish Compliments for Men on Appearance

A Man

Compliments about a man’s smile and hair would be the same as for women, even though they’re certainly used less often. You can also compliment a man on the following:

A- Outfit

  • Podoba mi się Twój garnitur. (“I like your suit.”)
  • Fajne jeansy! (“Cool jeans.”)
  • Szykowna marynarka! (“Stylish jacket!”)
  • Nieźle sie odstawiłeś! (“You look very fancy.”)

The last expression is humorous and can be used in a mean way, so make sure you’re on good terms with someone and that they get your sense of humor before you use it.

B- General compliments on looks

  • Jesteś najwspanialszym mężczyzną, jakiego znam. (“You’re the best man I know.”)

This phrase is romantic in nature. Are you keen to learn more about romance and love in Polish?

  • Kim jest ten przystojniak? (“Who’s that handsome man?”)

Another humorous way to comment on the fact that someone looks good.

  • Bardzo wyprzystojniałeś. (“You’ve gotten much more handsome.”)

This one is a compliment often used for someone who we’ve known as a child or teenager.

  • Nieźle się trzymasz. (“You still look good.”)

This expression is used for someone who’s aging well. Are you still unsure of how to compliment a guy? Wikihow to the rescue!

2. Praising Someone in Polish for Their Work

A Group of People Representing Different Professions

Everyone likes to feel appreciated, which is why it’s so important to know the best Polish compliments to give on a job well done. If you don’t feel confident about your work-related Polish vocabulary, go to our jobs/work vocabulary builder.

1- General Work-Related Compliments

There’s a number of Polish compliments applicable in many work-related situations. They include:

  • Dobra robota! (“Good job!”)
  • Widać, że się starał! (“I can tell you’ve put a lot of work into it!”) [to a man]
  • Widać, że się starał! (“I can tell you’ve put a lot of work into it!”) [to a woman]
  • Zasłużył na pochwałę! (“You’ve earned your praise!”) [to a man]
  • Zasłużył na pochwałę! (“You’ve earned your praise!”) [to a woman]

By the same token, you could humorously suggest that someone’s work is so good that he or she deserves a raise:

  • Zasłużył na podwyżkę! (“You should get a raise!”) [to a man]
  • Zasłużył na podwyżkę! (“You should get a raise!”) [to a woman]
  • Twoje wyniki przerosły moje oczekiwania. (“Your results have surpassed my expectations.”)

2- Specific Compliments on Someone’s Work

There are also many compliments you can use in specific situations, depending on the gender of the noun:

A- Feminine

  • Bardzo podobała mi się twoja prezentacja. (“I’ve really enjoyed your presentation.”)
  • Ciekawa przemowa. (“An interesting talk.”)
  • Znakomita sugestia. (“An excellent suggestion.”)

B- Masculine

  • Bardzo podoba mi się twój pomysł. (“I really like your idea.”)
  • Ciekawy plan. (“An interesting plan.”)
  • Znakomity raport. (“An excellent report.”)

C- Neutral

  • Bardzo podobało mi się twoje wystąpienie. (“I’ve really enjoyed your speech.”)
  • Ciekawe podejście. (“An interesting approach.”)
  • Znakomite podsumowanie. (“An excellent summary.”)

3. Complimenting Someone on Their Skills

Compliments

Sometimes, in your private life, you may want to compliment a friend or an acquaintance on their skills. After all, complimenting someone in Poland may earn you brownie points.

One thing to remember is that Polish compliments for a girl or woman are often different than those for a man. This is due to the changes in the form of adjectives and gender-dependent nouns.

Learn high-frequency adjectives in Polish, and then get ready to use them in Polish compliments!

1- Saying Nice Things About Someone’s Cooking

A Person Seasoning a Dish

If someone makes an effort to cook for you, you should at least know how to say how much you’ve enjoyed the meal. By the way, have you ever tried Polish cuisine?

  • Jesteś świetną kuchar. (“You’re a great cook.”) [to a woman]
  • Jesteś świetnym kucharzem. (“You’re a great cook.”) [to a man]
  • Naprawdę pycha, dziękuję! (“It’s really delicious, thank you.”)
  • Świetnie gotujesz. (“You’re a great cook.”) [Literally: “You cook great.]
  • Przepyszna sałatka [or other feminine noun]. (“Great salad!”)
  • Przepyszny makaron [or other masculine noun]. (“Great pasta!”)
  • Niebo w gębie. Dasz mi przepis? (“Super-tasty! Can you give me the recipe?”) [Niebo w gębie is an idiomatic slang expression that literally means “Heaven in the mouth.”]

2- Praising Someone’s Artistic Skills

When a friend unleashes their inner artist, there’s nothing nicer for them than hearing some genuine appreciation for their skills. Here’s a number of handy phrases to use for that purpose:

A- Photography

  • Masz naprawdę dobre oko. (“You have a really good eye for photography.”)
  • Piękne ujęcie! (“What a beautiful shot!”)
  • Gdzie się nauczył robić takie świetne zdjęcia? (“Where did you learn to take such great pictures?”) [to a man]
  • Gdzie się nauczył robić takie świetne zdjęcia? (“Where did you learn to take such great pictures?”) [to a woman]
  • Super zdjęcie! (“Great picture!”)

Curious for more photography words? Listen to this conversation about a Polish photograph!

B- Painting

  • Świetnie malujesz! (“You paint well!”)
  • To ty to namalow? (“You’re the one who painted it?”) [to a woman]
  • To ty to namalow? (“You’re the one who painted it?”) [to a man]

These expressions, through doubt, introduce a suggestion that something is almost too good to be done by a non-professional. Such compliments are not uncommon in Polish culture.

  • Ten pies [or other masculine noun] wygląda jak żywy. (“This dog looks as if he was real.”)
  • Ta kobieta [or other feminine noun] wygląda jak żywa. (“This woman looks as if she was real.”)
  • To dziecko [or other neuter noun] wygląda jak żywe. (“This child looks as if it was real.”)

Żywy literally means “alive,” but in this context, it translates as “real.”

  • Przepiękny obraz! (“What a stunning painting!”)

C- Playing an instrument

A Young Man Playing the Piano

  • Pięknie grasz! (“You play beautifully!”)
  • Jesteś bardzo uzdolnioną pianist/saksofonist/gitarzyst. (“You’re a very talented pianist/saxophone player/guitar player.”) [to a woman]
  • Jesteś bardzo uzdolnionym pianistą/saksofonistą/gitarzystą. (“You’re a very talented pianist/saxophone player/guitar player.”) [to a man]
  • Grasz jak anioł! (“You play like an angel!”)

To learn how to talk about hobbies in Polish, don’t forget to go to our lesson “What do you do in your free time in Poland?”

3- Compliments About Language Skills

As a language-learner, you should know that learning a foreign language isn’t easy and that it’s extremely nice to be complimented on your skills. Here’s how you can say a few nice words about someone’s language fluency in Polish:

  • Świetnie mówisz po angielsku. (“You speak English very well.”)
  • Mówisz po włosku jak native speaker. (“You speak Italian like a native speaker.”)
  • Mówisz po niemiecku, jakbyś urodził się w Niemczech. (“You speak German as if you were born in Germany.”) [to a man]
  • Mówisz po niemiecku, jakbyś urodziła się w Niemczech. (“You speak German as if you were born in Germany.”) [to a woman]
  • Masz bardzo bogate słownictwo. (“You have a very rich vocabulary.”)
  • Jestem pod wrażeniem twoich zdolności językowych. (“I’m impressed by your language skills.”)

A Number of Dictionaries

Do you know how to brag about your own language skills in Polish? If not, check out our lesson “Who wants to be a polyglot?”

4. Making Compliments Sound More Sincere

Positive Feelings

Knowing the best Polish compliments is one thing, and knowing when to give them so that they sound natural is another. Below, you can find tips on making your compliments sound more sincere.

1. Speak only the truth.

The best way to make your compliments more sincere is being honest. Don’t tell someone you like their new hairstyle just because you think that’s what’s expected.

2. If you have nothing nice to say, say nothing.

Only give the compliments you mean, and if you have nothing nice to say, remain quiet. This means you should refrain from negativity. Your sincere compliment later on will mean nothing if you manage to offend someone beforehand.

3. Comment on specific things.

Vague compliments such as Wyglądasz świetnie! (“You look great!”) can be nice, but people prefer specific compliments, as they come off as more genuine. That’s why Uwielbiam takie kolorowe kolczyki! (“I love such colorful earrings!”) sounds more like it’s coming from the heart than simply saying Fajne kolczyki! (“Cool earrings!”)

4. Smile and look people in the eye.

A sincere smile and looking people in the eye are sure ways to make a compliment feel genuine.

5. Respect people’s personal space.

Polish people are much less touchy than, for instance, Americans or people in some other nations. You don’t want to come off as pushy or flirty, if that’s not your intention. Observe your environment and ask around to learn how close you should get to a person and in what situations touch is appropriate.

If you feel like you need more help, read the guide on Wikihow “How to Give a Compliment.” Psychology Today is also there for you to tell you about 9 types of compliments that do and don’t work.

5. What to Expect After You Give a Compliment

Polish people enjoy compliments just like people in any other nation. However, compliments in Polish culture are often diminished by people who receive them. For instance, if you praise someone’s piano-playing skills with:

  • Pięknie grasz na pianinie. (“You play the piano beautifully.”)

You can expect a reply of Dziękuję (“Thank you”), followed by something along the lines of: To tylko zasługa mojego nauczyciela. (“It’s only because of my teacher.”)

A Thank You Note

Other ways to say “thanks” for the compliment in Polish include:

  • Dzięki, ale to nic wielkiego! (“Thanks, but it’s nothing special!”)
  • Naprawdę tak sądzisz? Dzięki! (“Do you really think so? Thanks!”)
  • Dzięki wielkie! (“Thanks a lot!”)

Trip Savvy has some great information on the intricacies of the Polish culture, if you would like to learn even more!

6. Final Thoughts

Today, you’ve learned many useful Polish phrases. Compliments, after all, are an indispensable communication tool. Polish compliment translations don’t always have exact matches in English, but there’s a wide variety of compliments in this language.

Whenever you need Polish compliments for a girl, woman, or man, you can consult our article again to find them. You can also read about the top 10 compliments you always want to hear in Polish. Which compliment would you like to hear the most? Let us know in the comments section before you go.

PolishPod101.com can offer you much more than just Polish compliments, though. If you want to learn how to speak Polish from scratch, PolishPod101 is a perfect tool for that. Get your free lifetime account now and access thousands of audio and video lessons, lesson materials, and other learning tools on your mobile device of choice.

Happy learning!

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Celebrating International Children’s Day in Poland

Do you remember being a kid? The world was bigger, our imaginations seemed to cover more ground, and weekends, summer vacation, and holidays were the best thing ever!

In Poland, International Children’s Day doesn’t mean a day away from school, but it is a day of fun and enjoyment for children across the country! In this article, you’ll learn about Polish Children’s Day celebrations, the holiday’s history, and some useful vocabulary.

Let’s get started.

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1. What is International Children’s Day?

This holiday has roots in the United States, having started when a Massachusetts pastor gave a special sermon for and about children in 1857. However, International Children’s Day officially began in 1925 when the World Conference on Child Welfare declared it in Geneva, Switzerland. The holiday quickly spread from then on, and International Children’s Day in Poland was officially recognized in 1950.

Polish Children’s Day is predominantly a day for children to have zabawa (“fun”) and enjoy themselves. There’s also an emphasis on protecting children’s rights—particularly those outlined in the Konwencja o prawach dziecka (“Convention on the Rights of the Child”)—to ensure that they have a fulfilling dzieciństwo (“childhood”).

2. Children’s Day Date

A Mother and Her Young Daughter in the Grass Smiling

Each year, Poles celebrate International Children’s Day on June 1. This is when many other countries (though not all) celebrate this holiday as well.

3. How to Celebrate International Children’s Day

Two Kids Playing on a Playground

Activities for International Children’s Day vary from year to year, and there are no set traditions set in place. This is not a national holiday, meaning that children (unfortunately) still have to go to school on International Children’s Day.

Still, schools and parents do what they can to make this a radosny (“joyful”) holiday for the kids. Schools often organize special activities, usually involving sports competitions or other games such as tug-of-war. Parents may spend extra time with their children, make their child’s favorite dinner, or give their child a new zabawka (“toy”) and słodycze (“sweets”).

On International Children’s Day, Poland is also experiencing its first bout of summer. This makes Children’s Day in Poland a fantastic time to engage in outdoor activities such as picnics or outdoor games. In 2015, even then-Prime Minister Ewa Kopacz got involved, inviting several children for a picnic with her.

Another defining feature of Poland’s take on this holiday is the Parliament of Children and Youth. Each year on Children’s Day, Poland’s chosen high school students—determined by the quality of essays they write on a given topic—meet together and discuss modern topics of interest concerning the country’s youth. The parliament has gathered together each year since 1994, and Poland is the first European country to have organized such a parliament.

4. Brushing Your Teeth…?

If you have kids—or remember being one—we’re sure you know the struggle of getting a child to brush their teeth regularly.

Many Polish parents face this struggle every day, but on Children’s Day, they make a special concession for their children. Yep! Most Polish kids don’t have to brush their teeth before bed on this holiday (even after eating so many sweets…).

5. Must-Know Vocabulary for Children’s Day

A Basket Full of Different Sweets

Let’s review some of the vocabulary words from this article!

  • Dziecko — “Child” [n. neut]
  • Słodycze — “Sweets” [n. neut]
  • Zabawka — “Toy” [n. fem]
  • Zabawa — “Fun” [n. fem]
  • Dzieciństwo — “Childhood” [n. neut]
  • Szczęśliwy — “Happy” [adj.]
  • Radosny — “Joyful” [adj.]
  • Bawić się — “Play” [v.]
  • Lizak — “Lollipop” [n. masc]
  • Konwencja o prawach dziecka — “Convention on the Rights of the Child” [fem]

If you want to hear the pronunciation of each word and phrase listed above, be sure to check out our Polish International Children’s Day vocabulary list!

Final Thoughts

We hope you enjoyed learning about International Children’s Day in Poland with us, and that you took away some valuable information about Polish culture!

Do you celebrate Children’s Day in your country? If so, what are the most common traditions and celebrations? Let us know in the comments!

If you want to continue learning about Polish culture and the language, PolishPod101.com has several free resources for you:

This only scratches the surface of everything that PolishPod101.com has to offer the aspiring Polish-learner. To make the most of your study time, create your free lifetime account today; for access to exclusive content and lessons, upgrade to our Premium or Premium PLUS plans.

We want to help you reach your language-learning goals, and we’ll be here with you every step of the way there.

Happy International Children’s Day from the PolishPod101 family!

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How to Express Anger Without Using Polish Swear Words

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Knowing Polish swear words may come in handy in some situations, such as when you’re watching movies in Polish. Unfortunately, if you use them in real-life situations, you may offend someone or get into trouble. That’s why you won’t find a list of Polish swear words here.

The real skill to acquire is learning how to express anger without using the worst Polish curses. How would an angry Polish person do that? We’ve prepared a number of useful expressions for you.

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Table of Contents

  1. Angry Imperatives
  2. Angry Warnings
  3. Angry Blaming
  4. Describing How You Feel
  5. How to Calm Yourself Down When You’re Angry
  6. Final Thoughts

1. Angry Imperatives

Complaints

It’s important to have a good understanding of what’s socially acceptable in Poland. In terms of Polish swear words, people in this cold country—especially the older generation—are quite conservative. This is why, instead of using Polish curse phrases, you can stick to a number of milder angry imperatives. You’ll still get your point across, but no one will think that you’re an impolite or vulgar person.

1- “Shut up” phrases

A Person with a Finger in Front of Her Mouth Asking Someone to be Quiet

Saying “shut up” is not the nicest thing to say in English, but sometimes in anger, you may feel like you have no choice but to use it. Here’s a number of relevant angry Polish phrases:

  • Zamknij się! (“Shut up!” )
  • Zamkniesz się wreszcie? (“Will you finally shut up?” )
  • Zamknij się wreszcie! (“Do shut up!” )
  • Cicho bądź! (“Be quiet!” )
  • Cisza! (“Quiet!” )
  • Nie odzywaj się niepytany. (Literally: “Don’t speak unasked.” ) [to a man]
  • Nie odzywaj się niepytana. (Literally: “Don’t speak unasked.” ) [to a woman]
  • Pytał Cię ktoś? (Literally: “Has anyone asked you?” )
  • Pytał Cię ktoś o zdanie? (“Has anyone asked your opinion?” )

2- “Leave me alone” phrases

There’s a number of useful phrases in Polish that you can use to ask someone to leave you alone. And again, there’s no need to use Polish curse phrases to obtain this effect:

  • Daj mi spokój! (Literally “Give me a rest!” and translates to “Leave me alone!” )
  • Zostaw mnie w spokoju! (“Leave me alone!” )
  • Daj już spokój! (“Give it a rest!” )
  • Odczep się! (Literally “Stop clinging to me!” and translates as “Go away!” )

3- “Stop” phrases

Do you know what nine things you need to stop doing to be successful? With these phrases, we’ll focus on how to let others know that you want them to stop doing something.

  • Przestań! (“Stop!” )
  • Przestaniesz w końcu? (“Will you finally stop?” )
  • Przestań wreszcie! (“Stop!” ) [Literally: “Stop, finally!”]
  • Przestań się tak zachowywać! (“Stop behaving like this!” )
  • Skończ z tym! (“Stop with this!” )
  • Koniec z tym! (“This is the end of it!” )
  • Koniec i basta! (Literally: “The end and that’s it!” and translates to “This is the end of it!” )

4- Other useful angry imperatives

Below you’ll find a number of other useful imperatives to express negative emotions in Polish.

  • Spadaj! (“Get lost!” )
  • Spadaj na drzewo! (Literally: “Get lost onto the tree!” )
  • Spadówa! (“Get lost!” )

These three expressions are the best options to tell someone to get lost. There are many other ways to say this, but they’re more offensive.

A Child Jumping on the Couch and a Helpless Mother

  • Uspokój się! (“Calm down!” )
  • No weź się uspokój! (“Do calm down!” )
  • Uspokoisz się wreszcie? (“Will you finally calm down?” )

The above phrases are useful when you’re irritated because someone is overly agitated, and you want them to calm down.

  • Koniec dyskusji! (“End of discussion!” )
  • Nie dyskutuj ze mną! (Literally “Don’t discuss with me!” and translates to “Don’t question me!” )
  • Nie chcę (już) o tym rozmawiać. (“I don’t want to talk about it [anymore].” )

All of the above phrases can be used when you’re no longer interested in discussing a topic, or when your decision is final and you want to let the other person know you won’t change your mind.

  • Wynocha! (“Get out of here!” )
  • Wynoś się! (“Get out of here!” )
  • Zejdź mi z oczu! (“Get out of my sight!” )

If nothing is working, sometimes you may want to ask someone to disappear, at least for the time being. The abovementioned expressions are perfect if you want to start diffusing the situation before it gets out of hand.

Alternatively, if you’re very angry and you feel like you never want to see the person again, you can say:

  • Nie chcę Cię więcej widzieć! (“I don’t want to ever see you again.” )

Use this phrase carefully, though. It may not be one of the worst Polish curses, but it can really hurt someone!

The phrases we outlined in this section are used in informal conversations. But what should you say if you’re experiencing bad service in Poland? Click the link to find out!

2. Angry Warnings

When you want to let someone know you’re really angry in Polish, you may want to use certain warnings to prevent a fight. Here are some useful expressions for people who want to learn angry words in Polish:

  • Nie prowokuj mnie! (“Don’t provoke me!” )
  • Prosisz się o kłopoty! (“You’re asking for trouble!” )
  • Ostrzegam Cię! (“I’m warning you!” )
  • To moje ostatnie ostrzeżenie! (“This is my last warning.” )

The above angry warnings are a great way to show the other person that you’re upset. They can be used toward adults and children alike.

Three Fingers of a Hand

  • Liczę do trzech! (“I’m counting to three!” )

This is a very common phrase used by parents. It’s a warning for the child to do what the parent has asked them to before they finish counting to three (raz, dwa, trzy!). If not, there will be consequences.

Would you like to learn more about counting in Polish? Check out these lessons:

Here’s another handy angry Polish phrase:

  • Nie będę tolerować takiego zachowania. (“I will not tolerate this behavior.” )

This angry warning is mostly used by authority figures, such as parents or teachers.

  • Nie wtrącaj się! (“Stay out of it!” )
  • Zajmij się swoimi sprawami! / Zajmij się własnymi sprawami! (“Mind your own business!” )
  • To nie Twoja sprawa! (“It’s none of your business!” )

The last three phrases can be used in situations where someone is getting involved in your personal matters, and you don’t want them to.

Before moving on to the next section, there’s also a number of warning idioms in Polish you may be interested in.

3. Angry Blaming

There are situations in life when a person feels so upset that blaming someone else seems like the only solution. They may not be the most productive things to say, but they’re certainly better than offensive Polish swear words!

  • Co ty sobie wyobrażasz? (Literally “What are you thinking?” but has the meaning of “What were you thinking?” in English)
  • Zwariowałeś? (“Have you gone mad?” )
  • Jesteś nienormalny! (Literally “You’re not normal!” but the meaning is closer to “There’s something wrong with you!” ) [to a man]
  • Jesteś nienormalna! [the same expression, but used toward a woman]

These three expressions are used when someone does something outrageous that really upsets you.

  • Jesteś niemożliwy! (“You’re impossible!” ) [to a man]
  • Jesteś niemożliwa! [same as above, but to a woman]

The main meaning of this phrase is similar to the other ones. However, it can also have a positive connotation, like if someone has pleasantly surprised us. Don’t worry though, there’s little to no scope for misunderstanding. The intended meaning is implied by the tone and the context.

A Visibly Angry Man Shouting

  • Chyba sobie żartujesz! (Literally “It seems like you’re joking!” but the meaning is closer to “You must be kidding me!” )
  • Chyba sobie żarty stroisz! (this is another version of the expression above)

Both are used when someone’s suggestion or statement is so upsetting that it’s difficult to believe.

  • Masz o sobie za wysokie mniemanie! (“You think too much of yourself!” )

This is a useful expression in situations where someone is behaving in an arrogant manner, and you want to put them in their place.

  • To wszystko Twoja wina! (“It’s all your fault!” )
  • To wszystko przez Ciebie! (“It’s all because of you!” )
  • Pokpiłeś sprawę! (“You’ve messed up!” )

It’s never truly the fault of one side or the other, but there are reasons why you think it’s always your partner’s fault. The above expressions are reasonably polite Polish curse phrases to use when you feel that it’s the other person who’s to blame in a given situation.

  • Nie da się z tobą wytrzymać! (“I can’t stand you!” )
  • Nienawidzę Cię! (“I hate you!” )
  • Nigdy Ci tego nie zapomnę! (“I’ll never forget that!” )
  • Nigdy Ci tego nie wybaczę! (“I’ll never forgive you!” )

These expressions are things an angry Polish person would say just before slamming the door. Yet again, it’s better to use these than to turn to stronger language. But there are still better ways of channeling your anger.

4. Describing How You Feel

Negative Verbs

A much more productive alternative to using mild Polish curse words and expressions is simply describing your feelings.

Here are two very common Polish expressions to describe your negative feelings and let the other person know you’re angry in Polish:

  • Wyprowadził mnie z równowagi! (Literally “You’ve unbalanced me!” but translates to “You’ve made me very upset!” ) [to a man]
  • Wyprowadził mnie z równowagi! [the same expression, but to a woman]

Now, let’s learn some more handy phrases. As you can see, there are two versions of the adjective below (click on the link to review other high-frequency adjectives). The first one refers to female speakers and the second one to male speakers.

  • Jestem zła/zły. (“I’m angry.” ) [same as “mad” in Polish]
  • Jestem bardzo zła/zły. (“I’m very angry.” )
  • Jestem na Ciebie zła/zły. (“I’m angry with you.” )
  • Trzęsę się ze złości. (“I’m so angry I’m shaking.” )
  • Gotuję się ze złości. (“I’m boiling with anger.” )

You can find more vocabulary for expressing negative feelings in Polish in our vocabulary builder 21 words for negative emotions.

5. How to Calm Yourself Down When You’re Angry

A Woman Sitting in Meditation

Talking about your feelings is a good solution, but there’s an even better way to avoid using Polish curse words. Can you guess what it is? It’s calming yourself down. With these tips, you may not feel the need to get angry in Polish after all:

  • Take a few deep breaths; if you can, close your eyes, too.
  • Go for a walk.
  • Exercise or go for a run.
  • Listen to relaxing or meditative music.
  • Write your feelings down.
  • Think about why you’re angry. Are you right or are you projecting?

You can find more tips on how to calm yourself down when you’re angry on Wikihow. If none of the tips helps you, check out our lesson on being angry to expand your vocabulary on this topic even further.

6. Final Thoughts

Today you’ve learned how to express anger in Polish without using strong Polish curse words, and you’ve added many useful expressions to your vocabulary for situations where you want to say something not-so-nice to someone.

We didn’t give you the worst Polish curse words here, but you can find the top five Polish phrases your teacher will never teach you and a lot of other useful content on PolishPod101.com. With us, you can learn with interactive and fun content that will help you speak Polish in no time. Don’t take our word for it, though. Start your free trial today, and see for yourself why learners from all over the world choose this tool to learn Polish.

Don’t go yet! Let us know which of these angry Polish phrases is your favorite. We’re waiting to hear from you in the comments section. 🙂

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Święto Pracy: Celebrating Labor Day in Poland

For Labor Day, Poland consistently gets a whopping three-day weekend to relax, celebrate, and protest for more workers’ rights. But this holiday doesn’t resonate well with everyone!

In this article, you’ll learn about Labor Day traditions and history in Poland, and pick up some useful vocabulary words along the way.

Let’s get started.

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1. What is Labor Day?

Someone Holding a Wrench in Their Hand against a Red Background

International Labor Day is a public holiday in Poland, and is also part of the Majówka (May holidays). Because May 3 is another major holiday in the country, many people take not one day off, but at least three.

In Poland, Labor Day is a day for workers to odpoczywać (“rest” ) from their normal day-to-day duties. Some people take advantage of this day to demonstrate for more employees’ rights or to simply honor the working class. Perhaps most importantly, Labor Day is associated with patriotyzm (“patriotism” ), considering that May 3 is Poland’s Constitution Day.

Despite the laid-back nature of this holiday today, there’s a lot of controversy in Poland regarding Labor Day. This is because, during the communist rule in Poland, Labor Day was largely associated with the communist agenda and was one of the most important holidays at the time.

    → Study our vocabulary list for Jobs / Work to learn some practical Labor Day words!

2. When is Labor Day?

A Man Relaxing on the Couch

Each year, Poles celebrate Labor Day on May 1. This is the same date as the rest of the world, except for the United States, which celebrates on the first Monday of September.

3. Labor Day Traditions & Celebrations in Poland

A Group of People Having a Picnic Together

On Labor Day, Poland has plenty of time to relax, because Labor Day is part of a długi weekend (“long weekend holiday” ).

During this time, cities compete with each other based on the number of attractions, organizing picnics, concerts, performances, exhibitions, fairs, tastings of regional dishes, and reconstructions of historical events. During the picnic in the Mazovia region, the region’s largest knightly tournament takes place, while at the Museum of Battle of Grunwald, people can watch an International Horseback Archery Competition.

A favorite tradition is to spędzać czas z rodziną (“spend time with family” ), often outdoors in the fresh spring air. Many families go on a picnic together (usually with BBQ food!), or sometimes a longer trip to somewhere outside their city or town. Though not as common as it once was, some places in Poland still hold Labor Day parades and demonstrations for more workers’ rights.

As we mentioned earlier, Labor Day is considered a patriotic holiday. Many people decorate their buildings or homes with the Polish flag!

    → We have vocabulary lists on Cooking and Polish Foods. Check them out to learn some related words and phrases. 😉

4. Making Up for Lost Time

This long Labor Day weekend sounds great, until you realize that one of the days (May 2) isn’t actually a holiday. How do Poles make up for losing this normal workday?

Usually, Poles need to go into work on a designated weekend day in order to make up for this lost time. But it’s well worth it for three days off in a row!

5. Must-Know Vocabulary for Labor Day in Poland

Someone Wearing a Shirt with the Polish Flag Colors

Ready to review some of the vocabulary words from this lesson? Here’s a list of the most important words and phrases for Labor Day in Poland!

  • Odpoczywać — “Rest” [v.]
  • Święto Pracy — “Labor Day” [n. neut]
  • Flaga — “Flag” [n. fem]
  • Patriotyzm — “Patriotism” [n. masc]
  • Dzień wolny od pracy — “Day off” [n. masc]
  • Robotnik — “Worker” [n. masc]
  • Pochód — “March” [n. masc]
  • Uczcić — “Celebrate” [v.]
  • Długi weekend — “Long weekend holiday” [n. masc]
  • Majówka — “Picnic” [n. fem]
  • Spędzać czas z rodziną — “Spend time with family”
  • Protest — “Protest” [n. masc]
  • Biało-czerwony — “White-and-red” [adj.]

To hear the pronunciation of each word and phrase, and to read them alongside relevant images, be sure to check out our Polish Labor Day vocabulary list!

Final Thoughts

We hope you enjoyed learning about Labor Day in Poland with us, and that you took away some valuable information.

How do you celebrate Labor Day in your country? Are Labor Day traditions similar or very different from those in Poland? We look forward to hearing from you in the comments!

If you’re interested in learning more about Polish culture and the language, check out the following pages on PolishPod101.com:

For even more great Polish-learning content, create your free lifetime account today. To get exclusive lessons for even faster learning, you can also upgrade to our Premium or Premium PLUS plans!

Happy Labor Day! 🙂

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Essential Vocabulary for Life Events in Polish

Thumbnail

What is the most defining moment you will face this year? From memories that you immortalize in a million photographs, to days you never wish to remember, one thing’s for certain: big life events change you. The great poet, Bukowski, said, “We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well, that death will tremble to take us.” The older I get, the more I agree with him!

Talking about significant events in our lives is part of every person’s journey, regardless of creed or culture. If you’re planning to stay in Poland for more than a quick visit, you’re sure to need at least a few ‘life events’ phrases that you can use. After all, many of these are shared experiences, and it’s generally expected that we will show up with good manners and warm wishes.

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Table of Contents

  1. Life Events
  2. Marriage Proposal Lines
  3. Talking About Age
  4. Conclusion

1. Life Events

Do you know how to say “Happy New Year” in Polish? Well, the New Year is a pretty big deal that the whole world is in on! We celebrate until midnight, make mindful resolutions, and fill the night sky with the same happy words in hundreds of languages. No doubt, then, that you’ll want to know how to say it like a local!

Big life events are not all about fun times, though. Real life happens even when you’re traveling, and certain terminology will be very helpful to know. From talking about your new job to wishing your neighbors “Merry Christmas” in Polish, here at PolishPod101, we’ve put together just the right vocabulary and phrases for you.

1- Birthday – urodziny

If you’re like me, any excuse to bring out a pen and scribble a note is a good one. When there’s a birthday, even better: hello, handwriting!

Your Polish friend will love hearing you wish them a “Happy birthday” in Polish, but how much more will they appreciate a thoughtful written message? Whether you write it on their Facebook wall or buy a cute card, your effort in Polish is sure to get them smiling! Write it like this:

Wszystkiego najlepszego

Older Woman Blowing Out Candles on a Birthday Cake Surrounded by Friends.

Now that you know the words, I challenge you to put them to music and sing your own “Happy birthday” song in Polish! It’s not impossible to figure out even more lyrics, once you start discovering the language from scratch.

2- Buy – kupować

If there’s a special occasion, you might want to buy somebody a gift. As long as you’ve checked out Polish etiquette on gift-giving (do a Google search for this!), it will be a lovely gesture. If you’re not sure what to buy, how about the awesome and universally-appealing gift of language? That’s a gift that won’t stop giving!

Two Women at a Counter in a Bookstore, One Buying a Book

3- Retire – przechodzić na emeryturę

If you’re planning to expand your mind and retire in Poland, you can use this word to tell people why you seem to be on a perpetual vacation!

Retirement is also a great time to learn a new language, don’t you think? And you don’t have to do it alone! These days it’s possible to connect to a vibrant learning community at the click of a button. The added benefit of a Daily Dose of Language is that it keeps your brain cells alive and curious about the world. After all, it’s never too late to realize those long-ignored dreams of traveling the globe…

4- Graduation – ukończenie szkoły

When attending a graduation ceremony in Poland, be prepared for a lot of formal language! It will be a great opportunity to listen carefully and see if you can pick up differences from the everyday Polish you hear.

Lecturer or University Dean Congratulating and Handing Over Graduation Certificate to a Young Man on Graduation Day.

5- Promotion – awans

Next to vacation time, receiving a promotion is the one career highlight almost everyone looks forward to. And why wouldn’t you? Sure, it means more responsibility, but it also means more money and benefits and – the part I love most – a change of scenery! Even something as simple as looking out a new office window would boost my mood.

6- Anniversary – rocznica

Some anniversaries we anticipate with excitement, others with apprehension. They are days marking significant events in our lives that can be shared with just one person, or with a whole nation. Whether it’s a special day for you and a loved one, or for someone else you know, this word is crucial to know if you want to wish them a happy anniversary in Polish.

7- Funeral – pogrzeb

We tend to be uncomfortable talking about funerals in the west, but it’s an important conversation for families to have. Around the world, there are many different customs and rituals for saying goodbye to deceased loved ones – some vastly different to our own. When traveling in Poland, if you happen to find yourself the unwitting observer of a funeral, take a quiet moment to appreciate the cultural ethos; even this can be an enriching experience for you.

8- Travel – podróżować

Travel – my favorite thing to do! Everything about the experience is thrilling and the best cure for boredom, depression, and uncertainty about your future. You will surely be forever changed, fellow traveler! But you already know this, don’t you? Well, now that you’re on the road to total Polish immersion, I hope you’ve downloaded our IOS apps and have your Nook Book handy to keep yourself entertained on those long bus rides.

Young Female Tourist with a Backpack Taking a Photo of the Arc de Triomphe

9- Graduate – skończyć szkołę

If you have yet to graduate from university, will you be job-hunting in Poland afterward? Forward-looking companies sometimes recruit talented students who are still in their final year. Of course, you could also do your final year abroad as an international student – an amazing experience if you’d love to be intellectually challenged and make a rainbow of foreign friends!

10- Wedding – ślub

One of the most-loved traditions that humans have thought up, which you’ll encounter anywhere in the world, is a wedding. With all that romance in the air and months spent on preparations, a wedding is typically a feel-good affair. Two people pledge their eternal love to each other, ladies cry, single men look around for potential partners, and everybody has a happy day of merrymaking.

Ah, but how diverse we are in our expression of love! You will find more wedding traditions around the world than you can possibly imagine. From reciting love quotes to marrying a tree, the options leave no excuse to be boring!

Married Couple During Reception, Sitting at Their Table While a Young Man Gives a Wedding Speech

11- Move – przeprowadzać się

I love Poland, but I’m a nomad and tend to move around a lot, even within one country. What are the biggest emotions you typically feel when moving house? The experts say moving is a highly stressful event, but I think that depends on the circumstances. Transitional periods in our lives are physically and mentally demanding, but changing your environment is also an exciting adventure that promises new tomorrows!

12- Be born – urodzić się

I was not born in 1993, nor was I born in Asia. I was born in the same year as Aishwarya Rai, Akon, and Monica Lewinsky, and on the same continent as Freddy Mercury. When and where were you born? More importantly – can you say it in Polish?

13- Get a job – dostać pracę

The thought of looking for a job in a new country can be daunting, but English speakers are in great demand in Poland – you just have to do some research, make a few friends and get out there! Also, arming yourself with a few Polish introductions that you can both say and write will give you a confidence boost. For example, can you write your name in Polish?

Group of People in Gear that Represent a Number of Occupations.

14- Die – umrzeć

Death is a universal experience and the final curtain on all other life events. How important is it, then, to fully live before we die? If all you have is a passport, a bucket list, and a willingness to learn some lingo, you can manifest those dreams!

15- Home – dom

If home is where the heart is, then my home is on a jungle island completely surrounded by the turquoise ocean. Right now, though, home is an isolation room with a view of half a dry palm tree and a tangle of telephone wires.

If you’re traveling to Poland for an extended stay, you’ll soon be moving into a new home quite unlike anything you’ve experienced before!

Large, Double-Story House with Lit Windows.

16- Job – praca

What job do you do? Does it allow you much time for travel, or for working on this fascinating language that has (so rightfully) grabbed your attention? Whatever your job, you are no doubt contributing to society in a unique way. If you’re doing what you love, you’re already on the road to your dream. If not, just remember that every single task is one more skill to add to your arsenal. With that attitude, your dream job is coming!

17- Birth – narodziny

Random question: do you know the birth rate of Poland?

If you’re lucky enough to be invited to see a friend’s baby just after they are born, you’ll have all my respect and all my envy. There is nothing cuter! Depending on which part of the country you’re in, you may find yourself bearing witness to some pretty unexpected birth customs. Enjoy this privilege!

Crying Newborn Baby Held By a Doctor or Nurse in a Hospital Theatre

18- Engaged – zaręczać się

EE Cummings said, “Lovers alone wear sunlight,” and I think that’s most true at the moment she says “yes.” Getting engaged is something young girls dream of with stars in their eyes, and it truly is a magical experience – from the proposal, to wearing an engagement ring, to the big reveal!

In the world of Instagram, there’s no end to the antics as imaginative couples try more and more outrageous ways to share their engagement with the world. I love an airport flashmob, myself, but I’d rather be proposed to on a secluded beach – salt, sand, and all!

Engagement customs around the world vary greatly, and Poland is no exception when it comes to interesting traditions. Learning their unique romantic ways will inspire you for when your turn comes.

Speaking of romance, do you know how to say “Happy Valentine’s Day” in Polish?

19- Marry – pobierać się

The one you marry will be the gem on a shore full of pebbles. They will be the one who truly mirrors your affection, shares your visions for the future, and wants all of you – the good, the bad and the inexplicable.

From thinking up a one-of-a-kind wedding, to having children, to growing old together, finding a twin flame to share life with is quite an accomplishment! Speaking of which…

2. Marriage Proposal Lines

Marriage Proposal Lines

Ah, that heart-stopping moment when your true love gets down on one knee to ask for your hand in marriage, breathlessly hoping that you’ll say “Yes!” If you haven’t experienced that – well, it feels pretty darn good, is all I can say! If you’re the one doing the asking, though, you’ve probably had weeks of insomnia agonizing over the perfect time, location and words to use.

Man on His Knee Proposing to a Woman on a Bridge.

How much more care should be taken if your love is from a different culture to yours? Well, by now you know her so well, that most of it should be easy to figure out. As long as you’ve considered her personal commitment to tradition, all you really need is a few words from the heart. Are you brave enough to say them in Polish?

3. Talking About Age

Talking about Age

Part of the wonder of learning a new language is having the ability to strike up simple conversations with strangers. Asking about age in this context feels natural, as your intention is to practice friendly phrases – just be mindful of their point of view!

When I was 22, I loved being asked my age. Nowadays, if someone asks, I say, “Well, I’ve just started my fifth cat life.” Let them ponder that for a while.

In Poland, it’s generally not desirable to ask an older woman her age for no good reason, but chatting about age with your peers is perfectly normal. Besides, you have to mention your birthday if you want to be thrown a birthday party!

4. Conclusion

Well, there you have it! With so many great new Polish phrases to wish people with, can you think of someone who has a big event coming up? If you want to get even more creative, PolishPod101 has much to inspire you with – come and check it out! Here’s just some of what we have on offer at PolishPod101:

  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Polish with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account – for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Polish dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about PolishPod101…!
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  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Polish teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to – what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Polish word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Polish level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in PolishPod101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Polish.

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How to Celebrate Nicolaus Copernicus’ Birthday in Poland

How to Celebrate Nicolaus Copernicus’ Birthday in Poland

Nicolaus Copernicus. You’ve probably heard that name before in school. But do you remember who he was exactly, and what he did? What world-changing ideas was Nicolaus Copernicus famous for?

In this article, you’ll learn about Nicolaus Copernicus’ greatest achievements, more interesting facts about him, and how Poland commemorates Nicolaus Copernicus’ birthday.

Are you ready? Let’s get started.

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1. Who was Nicolaus Copernicus?

Poles celebrate the astronomer Mikołaj Kopernik ( “Nicolaus Copernicus” ) each year on his birthday. Copernicus is most well-known for his heliocentryzm ( “heliocentrism” ) theory, which revolutionized astronomy. This is the theory that the sun is at the center of our galaxy, and that the planets obracać się wokół ( or “rotate around” ) the sun. While Nicolaus Copernicus’ heliocentric model faced lots of criticism when it was first proposed, it’s today the working model we use.

Nicolaus Copernicus’ astronomy achievements—particularly the publishing of his book De revolutionibus orbium coelestium—paved the way for later advances in astronomical science. Further, it both started the Copernican Revolution and contributed to the Scientific Revolution.

While Copernicus’ heliocentric model is perhaps his greatest achievement, this is far from all he accomplished in his lifetime. In addition to being an astronom (“astronomer”), Copernicus studied several other topics during his life and served in many different professions. These include, but aren’t limited to: a physician, an economist, and a translator.

2. Nicolaus Copernicus’ Date of Birth

Picture of Nicolaus Copernicus

Each year, Poles celebrate Nicolaus Copernicus’ birthday on February 19, the day he was born in 1473.

3. How Poles Mark Copernicus’ Birthday

Silhouette of Someone Looking Through a Telescope at Night

While there are no specific traditions or celebrations for Nicolaus Copernicus’ birthday, Poles do continue to venerate and honor him. In addition to specially marking Copernicus’ birthday, Poland is filled with numerous memorials of him.

For example, the Wrocław-Strachowice International Airport is named in honor of Copernicus. There are also two museums in Poland dedicated to him: Muzeum Mikolaja Kopernika in Frombork and the House of Nicolaus Copernicus Museum in Copernicus’ birthplace of Torun. Lastly, there are also Nicolaus Copernicus statues and monuments in Warsaw and Torun.

If you’re interested in learning even more Nicolaus Copernicus facts in his very own home country, be sure to check these places out!

4. Polish or German?

Did you know there’s some debate as to Nicolaus Copernicus’ nationality?

Copernicus was born in Royal Prussia—an area that was technically a part of the Kingdom of Poland—but grew up in a German-speaking family. He first went to school in Poland before going to a school in Italy and joining a group of German-speakers there.

While these nuances of Copernicus’ life make it difficult for modern-day scholars to determine his nationality, some people are uncertain that we should assign Copernicus a nationality. During the Renaissance period, people didn’t adhere to the concept of nationality the way we do today, and rather had firm attachments to the actual region they grew up in or associated themselves with. Some people make the claim that Copernicus, for this reason, would have called himself a Prussian.

So, was Copernicus Polish? German? Prussian? Something else altogether? And does it really matter?

What are your thoughts?

5. Must-Know Vocabulary for Nicolaus Copernicus’ Birthday

Einstein’s Theory of Special Relativity Written on a Blackboard

Ready to review some of the vocabulary words from this article? Here’s the essential Polish vocabulary for Nicolaus Copernicus’ birthday!

  • Słońce — “Sun”
  • Księżyc — “Moon”
  • Ziemia — “Earth”
  • Mikołaj Kopernik — “Nicolaus Copernicus”
  • Planeta — “Planet”
  • Galaktyka — “Galaxy”
  • Teoria — “Theory”
  • Wszechświat — “Universe”
  • Astronom — “Astronomer”
  • Ciało niebieskie — “Heavenly body”
  • Obracać się wokół — “Rotate around”
  • Heliocentryzm — “Heliocentrism”
  • Obserwować — “Observe”
  • Rewolucja — “Revolution”

Visit our Polish Nicolaus Copernicus’ Birthday vocabulary list to hear the pronunciation of each word, and to read them alongside relevant images.

Final Thoughts

The Polish people hold Nicolaus Copernicus in high regard, and are proud to call him a fellow Pole (despite the ambiguity around his technical nationality). We hope you enjoyed getting reacquainted with Copernicus, and that you learned something valuable about Polish culture.

Who are the most famous and well-respected people in your country, past or present? We look forward to hearing from you!

If you’re interested in learning more about Polish culture and holidays, you may find the following pages on PolishPod101.com useful:

Know that whatever your reasons for developing an interest in Polish culture or wanting to learn the language, PolishPod101.com is the best way to expand your knowledge and improve your skills. With tons of fun lessons for beginners, intermediate learners, and more advanced students, there’s something for everyone!

Create your free lifetime account today and start learning Polish like never before.

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Święto Trzech Króli: Celebrating Epiphany in Poland

Epiphany in Poland

The Feast of the Epiphany in Poland is an essential Christian holiday with a variety of fun traditions! In this article, you’ll learn about how Poles celebrate Epiphany as well as the story behind the holiday.

At PolishPod101.com, it’s our goal to ensure that every aspect of your language-learning journey is both fun and informative—starting with this article!

Are you ready? Let’s dive in.

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1. What is Epiphany Day in Poland?

Epiphany, or Three Kings’ Day, is called Święto Trzech Króli in Polish. This is a Christian feast that takes place in numerous countries around the world. In Poland, it’s a national public holiday, meaning that most businesses, workplaces, and schools are closed.

Epiphany Day in Poland is usually celebrated as the day that the three “wise men” (mędrzec) visited the Baby Jesus. The wise men followed Gwiazda betlejemska, or “Bethlehem’s star,” and arrived with gifts of frankincense, gold (złoto), and myrrh (mirra). For this reason, Epiphany is also viewed as a day of charity and giving.

Some people also celebrate Epiphany as the day on which Jesus was baptized, thus “revealing” the Holy Trinity.

2. Epiphany Date

Wise Men on Camels

Each year, Poles celebrate Epiphany on January 6. The night before is called Epiphany Eve.

3. How is Epiphany Celebrated in Poland?

Carol

Epiphany traditions in Poland are vast! On Epiphany Day, Poland tries to make the most of the last day of the Christmas season.

On Epiphany Day in Poland, parades featuring live animals, children, and the colors of Europe (red), Asia (green), and Africa (blue), march through the streets. The most popular of these parades takes place in Warsaw, though several other Polish towns host their own parades as well. Sometimes, the people in this parade will throw candy to children and other spectators!

Another common tradition of Epiphany in Poland is nativity reenactments. During these reenactments, children dress up as the most important characters from the story of the wise men and act the story out. People also enjoy singing carols (kolędy) on this day.

For Christians, the story of the wise men is a major component in the Ewangelia, or “Gospel.” Thus, devoted Christians—especially Catholics—will go to church on this day to receive blessings from priests.

In particular, very devout Catholics will bring a piece of chalk to the church, have a priest bless it, and then use that piece of chalk to write the letters C, B, and M along with the current year on their front door. It’s debated whether these letters represent the names of the three wise men, or if they stand for Christus mansionem benedicat, which is Latin phrase asking for Christ to bless the home.

Chalk isn’t the only thing blessed on the Epiphany holiday in Poland. Because the wise men brought three gifts with them, Poles bring three other items with them, usually in boxes. These items are meant to signify the wise men’s gifts (dary) to Baby Jesus, and are usually a gold ring, some type of incense (kadzidło), and some amber.

4. King Cake

Along with a variety of breads and other sweets, a popular Epiphany dessert for the Feast of the Epiphany in Poland is King Cake. This is a special round cake also eaten in many other countries for Epiphany.

Inside the cake is a coin or almond. The person who finds it in their slice of King Cake is the “king” for the day.

5. Must-Know Vocabulary for Epiphany in Poland

Incense

Ready to review some of the vocabulary words we saw in the article? Here’s the essential Polish vocabulary for Epiphany!

  • Złoto — Gold
  • Kolęda — Carol
  • Bóg — God
  • Ewangelia — Gospel
  • Betlejem — Bethlehem
  • Święto Trzech Króli — Epiphany
  • Pokłon — Obeisance
  • Kadzidło — Incense
  • Dar — Gift
  • Gwiazda betlejemska — Bethlehem’s star
  • Mirra — Myrrh
  • Mędrzec — Wise Men

To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, and to read them alongside relevant images, be sure to check out our Polish Epiphany vocabulary list.

Final Thoughts

We hope you enjoyed learning about Epiphany in Poland with us!

Do you celebrate Epiphany in your country? If so, are celebrations different or very similar to those in Poland? Let us know in the comments!

If you’re interested in learning more about Polish culture, or if you want to learn some wintery words to get you through the next couple of months, you may find the following pages useful:

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