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How to Express Anger Without Using Polish Swear Words

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Knowing Polish swear words may come in handy in some situations, such as when you’re watching movies in Polish. Unfortunately, if you use them in real-life situations, you may offend someone or get into trouble. That’s why you won’t find a list of Polish swear words here.

The real skill to acquire is learning how to express anger without using the worst Polish curses. How would an angry Polish person do that? We’ve prepared a number of useful expressions for you.

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Table of Contents

  1. Angry Imperatives
  2. Angry Warnings
  3. Angry Blaming
  4. Describing How You Feel
  5. How to Calm Yourself Down When You’re Angry
  6. Final Thoughts

1. Angry Imperatives

Complaints

It’s important to have a good understanding of what’s socially acceptable in Poland. In terms of Polish swear words, people in this cold country—especially the older generation—are quite conservative. This is why, instead of using Polish curse phrases, you can stick to a number of milder angry imperatives. You’ll still get your point across, but no one will think that you’re an impolite or vulgar person.

1- “Shut up” phrases

A Person with a Finger in Front of Her Mouth Asking Someone to be Quiet

Saying “shut up” is not the nicest thing to say in English, but sometimes in anger, you may feel like you have no choice but to use it. Here’s a number of relevant angry Polish phrases:

  • Zamknij się! (“Shut up!” )
  • Zamkniesz się wreszcie? (“Will you finally shut up?” )
  • Zamknij się wreszcie! (“Do shut up!” )
  • Cicho bądź! (“Be quiet!” )
  • Cisza! (“Quiet!” )
  • Nie odzywaj się niepytany. (Literally: “Don’t speak unasked.” ) [to a man]
  • Nie odzywaj się niepytana. (Literally: “Don’t speak unasked.” ) [to a woman]
  • Pytał Cię ktoś? (Literally: “Has anyone asked you?” )
  • Pytał Cię ktoś o zdanie? (“Has anyone asked your opinion?” )

2- “Leave me alone” phrases

There’s a number of useful phrases in Polish that you can use to ask someone to leave you alone. And again, there’s no need to use Polish curse phrases to obtain this effect:

  • Daj mi spokój! (Literally “Give me a rest!” and translates to “Leave me alone!” )
  • Zostaw mnie w spokoju! (“Leave me alone!” )
  • Daj już spokój! (“Give it a rest!” )
  • Odczep się! (Literally “Stop clinging to me!” and translates as “Go away!” )

3- “Stop” phrases

Do you know what nine things you need to stop doing to be successful? With these phrases, we’ll focus on how to let others know that you want them to stop doing something.

  • Przestań! (“Stop!” )
  • Przestaniesz w końcu? (“Will you finally stop?” )
  • Przestań wreszcie! (“Stop!” ) [Literally: “Stop, finally!”]
  • Przestań się tak zachowywać! (“Stop behaving like this!” )
  • Skończ z tym! (“Stop with this!” )
  • Koniec z tym! (“This is the end of it!” )
  • Koniec i basta! (Literally: “The end and that’s it!” and translates to “This is the end of it!” )

4- Other useful angry imperatives

Below you’ll find a number of other useful imperatives to express negative emotions in Polish.

  • Spadaj! (“Get lost!” )
  • Spadaj na drzewo! (Literally: “Get lost onto the tree!” )
  • Spadówa! (“Get lost!” )

These three expressions are the best options to tell someone to get lost. There are many other ways to say this, but they’re more offensive.

A Child Jumping on the Couch and a Helpless Mother

  • Uspokój się! (“Calm down!” )
  • No weź się uspokój! (“Do calm down!” )
  • Uspokoisz się wreszcie? (“Will you finally calm down?” )

The above phrases are useful when you’re irritated because someone is overly agitated, and you want them to calm down.

  • Koniec dyskusji! (“End of discussion!” )
  • Nie dyskutuj ze mną! (Literally “Don’t discuss with me!” and translates to “Don’t question me!” )
  • Nie chcę (już) o tym rozmawiać. (“I don’t want to talk about it [anymore].” )

All of the above phrases can be used when you’re no longer interested in discussing a topic, or when your decision is final and you want to let the other person know you won’t change your mind.

  • Wynocha! (“Get out of here!” )
  • Wynoś się! (“Get out of here!” )
  • Zejdź mi z oczu! (“Get out of my sight!” )

If nothing is working, sometimes you may want to ask someone to disappear, at least for the time being. The abovementioned expressions are perfect if you want to start diffusing the situation before it gets out of hand.

Alternatively, if you’re very angry and you feel like you never want to see the person again, you can say:

  • Nie chcę Cię więcej widzieć! (“I don’t want to ever see you again.” )

Use this phrase carefully, though. It may not be one of the worst Polish curses, but it can really hurt someone!

The phrases we outlined in this section are used in informal conversations. But what should you say if you’re experiencing bad service in Poland? Click the link to find out!

2. Angry Warnings

When you want to let someone know you’re really angry in Polish, you may want to use certain warnings to prevent a fight. Here are some useful expressions for people who want to learn angry words in Polish:

  • Nie prowokuj mnie! (“Don’t provoke me!” )
  • Prosisz się o kłopoty! (“You’re asking for trouble!” )
  • Ostrzegam Cię! (“I’m warning you!” )
  • To moje ostatnie ostrzeżenie! (“This is my last warning.” )

The above angry warnings are a great way to show the other person that you’re upset. They can be used toward adults and children alike.

Three Fingers of a Hand

  • Liczę do trzech! (“I’m counting to three!” )

This is a very common phrase used by parents. It’s a warning for the child to do what the parent has asked them to before they finish counting to three (raz, dwa, trzy!). If not, there will be consequences.

Would you like to learn more about counting in Polish? Check out these lessons:

Here’s another handy angry Polish phrase:

  • Nie będę tolerować takiego zachowania. (“I will not tolerate this behavior.” )

This angry warning is mostly used by authority figures, such as parents or teachers.

  • Nie wtrącaj się! (“Stay out of it!” )
  • Zajmij się swoimi sprawami! / Zajmij się własnymi sprawami! (“Mind your own business!” )
  • To nie Twoja sprawa! (“It’s none of your business!” )

The last three phrases can be used in situations where someone is getting involved in your personal matters, and you don’t want them to.

Before moving on to the next section, there’s also a number of warning idioms in Polish you may be interested in.

3. Angry Blaming

There are situations in life when a person feels so upset that blaming someone else seems like the only solution. They may not be the most productive things to say, but they’re certainly better than offensive Polish swear words!

  • Co ty sobie wyobrażasz? (Literally “What are you thinking?” but has the meaning of “What were you thinking?” in English)
  • Zwariowałeś? (“Have you gone mad?” )
  • Jesteś nienormalny! (Literally “You’re not normal!” but the meaning is closer to “There’s something wrong with you!” ) [to a man]
  • Jesteś nienormalna! [the same expression, but used toward a woman]

These three expressions are used when someone does something outrageous that really upsets you.

  • Jesteś niemożliwy! (“You’re impossible!” ) [to a man]
  • Jesteś niemożliwa! [same as above, but to a woman]

The main meaning of this phrase is similar to the other ones. However, it can also have a positive connotation, like if someone has pleasantly surprised us. Don’t worry though, there’s little to no scope for misunderstanding. The intended meaning is implied by the tone and the context.

A Visibly Angry Man Shouting

  • Chyba sobie żartujesz! (Literally “It seems like you’re joking!” but the meaning is closer to “You must be kidding me!” )
  • Chyba sobie żarty stroisz! (this is another version of the expression above)

Both are used when someone’s suggestion or statement is so upsetting that it’s difficult to believe.

  • Masz o sobie za wysokie mniemanie! (“You think too much of yourself!” )

This is a useful expression in situations where someone is behaving in an arrogant manner, and you want to put them in their place.

  • To wszystko Twoja wina! (“It’s all your fault!” )
  • To wszystko przez Ciebie! (“It’s all because of you!” )
  • Pokpiłeś sprawę! (“You’ve messed up!” )

It’s never truly the fault of one side or the other, but there are reasons why you think it’s always your partner’s fault. The above expressions are reasonably polite Polish curse phrases to use when you feel that it’s the other person who’s to blame in a given situation.

  • Nie da się z tobą wytrzymać! (“I can’t stand you!” )
  • Nienawidzę Cię! (“I hate you!” )
  • Nigdy Ci tego nie zapomnę! (“I’ll never forget that!” )
  • Nigdy Ci tego nie wybaczę! (“I’ll never forgive you!” )

These expressions are things an angry Polish person would say just before slamming the door. Yet again, it’s better to use these than to turn to stronger language. But there are still better ways of channeling your anger.

4. Describing How You Feel

Negative Verbs

A much more productive alternative to using mild Polish curse words and expressions is simply describing your feelings.

Here are two very common Polish expressions to describe your negative feelings and let the other person know you’re angry in Polish:

  • Wyprowadził mnie z równowagi! (Literally “You’ve unbalanced me!” but translates to “You’ve made me very upset!” ) [to a man]
  • Wyprowadził mnie z równowagi! [the same expression, but to a woman]

Now, let’s learn some more handy phrases. As you can see, there are two versions of the adjective below (click on the link to review other high-frequency adjectives). The first one refers to female speakers and the second one to male speakers.

  • Jestem zła/zły. (“I’m angry.” ) [same as “mad” in Polish]
  • Jestem bardzo zła/zły. (“I’m very angry.” )
  • Jestem na Ciebie zła/zły. (“I’m angry with you.” )
  • Trzęsę się ze złości. (“I’m so angry I’m shaking.” )
  • Gotuję się ze złości. (“I’m boiling with anger.” )

You can find more vocabulary for expressing negative feelings in Polish in our vocabulary builder 21 words for negative emotions.

5. How to Calm Yourself Down When You’re Angry

A Woman Sitting in Meditation

Talking about your feelings is a good solution, but there’s an even better way to avoid using Polish curse words. Can you guess what it is? It’s calming yourself down. With these tips, you may not feel the need to get angry in Polish after all:

  • Take a few deep breaths; if you can, close your eyes, too.
  • Go for a walk.
  • Exercise or go for a run.
  • Listen to relaxing or meditative music.
  • Write your feelings down.
  • Think about why you’re angry. Are you right or are you projecting?

You can find more tips on how to calm yourself down when you’re angry on Wikihow. If none of the tips helps you, check out our lesson on being angry to expand your vocabulary on this topic even further.

6. Final Thoughts

Today you’ve learned how to express anger in Polish without using strong Polish curse words, and you’ve added many useful expressions to your vocabulary for situations where you want to say something not-so-nice to someone.

We didn’t give you the worst Polish curse words here, but you can find the top five Polish phrases your teacher will never teach you and a lot of other useful content on PolishPod101.com. With us, you can learn with interactive and fun content that will help you speak Polish in no time. Don’t take our word for it, though. Start your free trial today, and see for yourself why learners from all over the world choose this tool to learn Polish.

Don’t go yet! Let us know which of these angry Polish phrases is your favorite. We’re waiting to hear from you in the comments section. 🙂

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