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Should You Study Polish at Home or Abroad?

Should You Study Polish at Home or Abroad?

There are countless reasons someone might take the leap and decide to study the Polish language. There are students who study Polish because they are genuinely fascinated by the culture. Other learners might want to reconnect with their family history. Still, others might be motivated by the needs and benefits of the workplace.

Whatever their reason for learning the language, there is often one common goal on the bucket list of Polish learners: travel to Poland!

Who isn’t enamored with the notion of traveling abroad and experiencing another culture in the context of a new language? Seriously, this is the thing language learning dreams are made of. Unfortunately, many students see travel to Poland as the end all be all of language learning methods. While you won’t ever hear me say that traveling to Poland is bad for your Polish, it is important to recognize that visiting a foreign country is not the one-way ticket to fluency many people think it is (especially if you’re new to the language).

In this post, we weigh the pros and cons of learning Polish at home and abroad.

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Unexpected obstacles to learning Polish in Poland

Obstacle

There’s a common obstacle native English speakers face while traveling abroad. Many people you meet in Poland (particularly the ones in large cities), will want to speak English to you once they realize you’re a foreigner. There are several reasons for this.

The first is out of practicality. As much as you would like to order your meal, bus ticket, or hotel reservation in Polish; the locals in the tourist industry are likely to resort to English. This is because they have a job to do and they don’t necessarily want to take the time or exercise the patience to figure out what you’re trying to tell them in Polish. English has become a common lingua franca in the tourism industry, and if you’re a foreigner prepare to hear a lot of it.

Another reason for all the English speaking is that locals will often jump at the chance to practice their English. Almost all language learners dream of making friends in a foreign language, but once you get abroad the reality is often a bit different. Locals will be just as excited to practice their English as you will be to practice your Polish. If their English is stronger than your Polish then unless they’re very conscious and patient, English will likely dominate the conversation.

There’s also what I like to call “The expat effect”. The longer you stay in Poland, the more you’ll realize just how hard it is to speak and practice Polish there. By sheer force of human nature, you will likely find yourself gravitating toward and hanging out with people who speak English very well. Often times the pull of comfort and human connection is stronger than the desire to learn a language. Thus you gradually start spending more and more of your time with strong English speakers and your Polish practice goes down the drain.

It’s not all bad abroad

Polish Flag

It’s not all bad if you’re a beginner to the Polish language and you find yourself in Poland. You’re liable to hear Polish on the streets wherever you go. While the people around you might not actually be talking to you, all that spoken Polish will allow you to see firsthand how the language is used on a daily basis.

This will help you hear words and phrases in the context of a conversation, which can be a powerful asset to language learning.

Unexpected advantages of learning Polish at home

Study at Home

One of my favorite reasons for learning a language at home is that it’s a lot easier to keep a regular schedule for your Polish studies. Traveling is an awesome experience, but there’s not usually a lot of downtimes. If it’s your first time in Warsaw or Krakow, you’re going to want to spend most of your time out and about savoring all the sights and experiences you can (and rightly so!). When at home things are more evenly paced and normal. It’s this consistency that allows you to practice Polish on a regular basis and constantly push your limits in the language.

If you study at home you also have the opportunity to immerse yourself in the language gradually. Study and experience have shown that immersion is by far the best method of learning a foreign language. However, going from zero to sixty as a beginner is a recipe for frustration. At home, you can tiptoe your way through the language at your own pace. You can start by subscribing to a Polish learning program, then work your way up to Polish media and music!

A plane ticket to Warsaw isn’t the only way to practice your Polish with real-life native speakers. If you happen to live in or around a big city, there’s a good chance there are some Polish speakers in your area. Try finding a nearby language exchange or meetup group. If there’s no native Polish speaker there, you’re still liable to find someone else learning the language. Depending on where you live there may even be a local Polish community. Keep an eye out for Polish specialty shops, as they’re a great sign that there are native speakers around.

If you can’t find Polish speakers locally than take your search to the web. There are a plethora of free online language exchanges you can use to find Polish natives who are looking to improve their English. There’s also a plethora of Polish language media too. You need only to hop onto Youtube or use the Polish language version of Google to unlock an entire digital world of spoken Polish.

Conclusion

If you’re learning Polish, traveling to Poland would be an awesome experience for sure. Just don’t expect a trip to solve all of your language learning difficulties. If learning Polish back at home is tough, doing the same in Poland will be just as hard if not harder.

If you’re a beginner studying back at home is one of the best settings for learning a new language. There’s a lot of surprising benefits most learners don’t even think about. This is good news because it means that anyone can effectively learn Polish!

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Learn How to Confidently Introduce Yourself In Polish

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Are you ready to learn how to introduce yourself in Polish? When you learn Polish, how to introduce yourself is one of the most important skills to acquire, as in any language. After all, you need to be able to have a simple conversation to make new connections.

People will really appreciate your effort in trying to learn the language they speak, and thanks to this skill you’ll be able to make a good, lasting first impression.

PolishPod101.com has you covered, and we’ll teach you how to say “My name is,” in Polish, and show you how to elaborate on your conversation from there! But before we teach you how to introduce yourself in Polish phrases, let’s get started with “hello” in Polish.

Table of Contents

  1. Say Hello First
  2. Learn How to Introduce Yourself in Polish
  3. Context Matters: Learn about How to Introduce Yourself in Polish in Different Situations
  4. Introducing Others
  5. How to Get Better at Introducing Yourself and Others in Polish
  6. Final Thoughts

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1. Say Hello First

In Polish, the way you speak to someone will differ, depending on the person you’re talking to. The formal way of introducing yourself in the Polish language is used with older people, your superiors at work, and strangers. The informal way of introducing yourself in the Polish language, on the other hand, can be used with people your age, acquaintances, and friends.

If in doubt, it’s always better to be overly formal than to risk offending someone. In general, the person who’s older should be the one to suggest that you use the informal way of addressing them.

1- “Hello” in Polish for Informal Introductions

- Cześć!

This is the most popular word used to say “hello'’ and “goodbye” in Polish to people you’re informal with. This is a perfect phrase to say before you introduce yourself in basic Polish.

- Hejka!

This is an equally popular way of saying “hello,” but is mostly used by young people.

2- “Hello” in Polish for Formal Introductions

- Dzień dobry

This is the most widespread way of saying “hello” with people you’re formal with. You can use it during the day.

- Dobry wieczór

In the evening, Dzień dobry is replaced with Dobry wieczór.

There are, of course, many other formal and informal ways of saying “hello” in Polish. You can learn more about them in our blog post: “How to Say ‘Hello’ in Polish, and Other Polish Greetings!

3- A Handshake or a Kiss?

Giving An Air Kiss

In Poland, a handshake is a common way of greeting people and introducing yourself to those you don’t know. Men often use a handshake to greet their friends.

Kissing on the cheek is common between female friends and female friends greeting their male friends. Usually, you don’t actually kiss a person, but rather do a quick peck in the air, close to the other person’s face. Some young people do it with those they meet for the first time instead of a handshake.


2. Learn How to Introduce Yourself in Polish

Introduce Yourself

There are different ways of introducing yourself in Polish. The most important things to include in your introduction are the basics: your name, your country of origin, and your place of residence.

1- “My Name Is” in Polish, Your Nationality, and Place of Residence

1. Saying “My Name is” in Polish

You’ve surely asked yourself the question: “How do you say My name is in Polish?” There are a few ways to do this, depending on whether you’re in a formal situation or an informal one. In this vein, when it comes to how to introduce yourself in Polish, grammar is essential. Essentially, there are two forms of address in Polish language introductions.

For informal questions, we use the verb form for the second-person singular (e.g. masz meaning “you have” ) and for formal questions with Pan/Pani, the third-person singular (e.g. ma meaning “Mr./Mrs. has”). We’ll start by looking at some informal dialogue (also note here how to say “nice to meet you” in Polish language introductions):

Informal

A: Cześć! Jak masz na imię?
“Hello! What’s your name?”

B: Mam na imię Piotrek. A ty?
“Hello! My name is Piotrek. What’s yours?”

A: Mam na imię Małgosia. Miło mi cię poznać.
“My name is Małgosia. Nice to meet you.”

B: Wzajemnie.
“Nice to meet you too.”

Sometimes in reply, people just give their name instead of using the full formula (e.g. Piotrek. Vs. Mam na imię Piotrek.).

Formal

Making Introduction in Office

In a formal context, an introductory dialogue with a woman would look like this:

A: Dzień dobry. Jak ma Pani na imię?
“Good day. What’s your name, Ma’am?”

B: Olga.

A: Miło mi Panią poznać.
“Nice to meet you, Ma’am.”

Pani is the title women are addressed with. A formal title used for men is Pan:

A: Dzień dobry. Jak ma Pan na imię?
“Good day. What’s your name, Sir?”

B: Roman.

A: Miło mi Pana poznać.
“Nice to meet you, Sir.”

2. Talking about Your Nationality in Polish

Countries in Polish

If someone wants to know what your nationality is, there are several possible questions they may ask you. Let’s deal with the informal introductions first:

Informal
  • Skąd pochodzisz? (Where do you come from?)
    Pochodzę z Anglii. (I come from England.)
  • Skąd jesteś? (Where are you from?)
    Jestem z Kanady. (I am from Canada.)
  • Gdzie się urodził? (Where were you born?) - Man
    Urodziłem się w Polsce. (I was born in Poland.) - Man
  • Gdzie się urodził? (Where were you born?) - Woman
    Urodziłam się w Polsce. (I was born in Poland.) - Woman

As you can see, the verb urodzić, like other Polish verbs in the past tense, has a male and female form. To be able to both ask questions and introduce yourself, learn both of them.

  • Jakiej jesteś narodowości? (What’s your nationality?)
    Jestem Amerykaninem. (I’m American.) - Man
    Jestem Amerykan. (I’m American.) - Woman

Adjectives in Polish also have gender. Try to memorize both versions for every new word, and with practice, you’ll see that sometimes you can guess the other form of a new adjective you encounter.

Formal

Now it’s time for questions that people would ask you in a formal introductory conversation. Remember that Pani and its forms refer to women, and Pan and its derivatives to men:

  • Skąd Pani/Pan pochodzi? (Where do you come from, Ma’am/Sir?)
  • Skąd Pani/Pan jest? (Where are you from, Ma’am/Sir?)
  • Gdzie się Pan urodził? (Where were you born, Sir?)
    Urodziłem się w Olsztynie. (I was born in Olsztyn.)
  • Gdzie się Pani urodziła? (Where were you born, Ma’am?)
    Urodziłam się w Krakowie. (I was born in Cracow.)
  • Jakiej jest Pan/Pani narodowości? (What’s your nationality Sir/Ma’am?)

3. Talking about Where You Live in Polish

Another important skill for introducing yourself in Polish is knowing how to say where you live. This is particularly relevant, seeing that today people move around the world and change countries.

If someone asks you:

- Gdzie mieszkasz? (Where do you live?)
- Gdzie Pan mieszka? (Where do you live, Sir?)
- Gdzie Pani mieszka? (Where do you live, Ma’am?)

You could reply:

- Mieszkam w Londynie. (I live in London.)

- Mieszkam we Włoszech. (I live in Italy.)

- Mieszkam w Warszawie, na Ursynowie. (I live in Warsaw, in Ursynów.)

- Mieszkam na Marszałkowskiej. (I live on Marszałkowska Street.)

If you want to learn more essential questions, check out our list of the Top 25 Polish Questions You Need to Know.

2- Describing Yourself in Polish

If you’re having a longer introductory conversation with someone in Polish, you’ll need more vocabulary to describe yourself. While learning how to introduce yourself in Polish words, practice how to tell people about your:

1. Age

Talking about age is often not appropriate in formal situations. Save it for your peers and people you’re informal with.

A: Ile masz lat?
“How old are you?”

B: Mam 20 lat.
“I’m 20 years old.”

2. Languages You Speak

When you don’t speak Polish fluently, it may be beneficial at times to let others know what other languages you speak.

A: Jakie znasz języki?
“What languages do you speak?”
B: Mówię po angielsku i trochę po polsku.
“I speak English and a bit of Polish.”

C: Jakie zna Pan/Pani języki?
“What languages do you speak, Sir/Ma’am?”
D: Angielski i znam kilka słów po polsku.
“English, and I know some words in Polish.”

3. Profession

I Love My Job Coffee Mug

It’s important to be able to tell people your profession when giving a self-introduction in the Polish language. Many names of Polish professions are male and are used as such, regardless of the gender of the person who practices it. However, more and more professions have female forms (i.e. nauczyciel [m] vs. nauczycielka [f]; aktor [m] vs. aktorka [f]), so always consult a dictionary when learning a new word.

- Kim jesteś z zawodu? (What’s your profession?)
- Kim jest Pan/Pani z zawodu? (What’s your profession, Sir/Ma’am?)
- Jestem… (I am… )
…prawnikiem. (…a lawyer.)
…wykładowcą. (…a lecturer.)
…muzykiem. (…a musician.)

- Czym się zajmujesz zawodowo? (What do you do?)
- Czym się Pan/Pani zajmuje zawodowo? (What do you do, Sir/Ma’am?)
- Pracuję jako… (I work as a…)
…lekarz. (…as a doctor.)
…farmaceuta. (…as a pharmacist.)
…agent nieruchomości. (…real estate agent.)

Now that you’ve learned how to talk about your age and spoken languages, and expressions like “I work as” in Polish, we can move on to other personal details.

3- Other Personal Details for Describing Yourself in Polish

There are certain details you can share about yourself when describing yourself in Polish during an introduction as well as when talking to family, friends, or colleagues in Polish. These details include:

1. Hobbies

W weekendy majsterkuję dla rozrywki.
“On weekends I do DIY for entertainment.”

Moim hobby jest fotografia.
“My hobby is photography.”

Dla relaksu maluję.
“I paint to relax.”

2. Likes and Dislikes

Likes:

Uwielbiam chodzić do kina.
“I enjoy going to the movies.”

W wolnym czasie lubię czytać.
“In my free time, I like to read.”

Kocham podróżować.
“I love travelling.”

Dislikes:

Nienawidzę głośnej muzyki.
“I hate loud music.”

Nie lubię próbować nowych potraw.
“I don’t like tasting new dishes.”

Nie przepadam za kotami.
“I don’t exactly love cats.”

3. Family Members

Nie mam rodzeństwa.
“I don’t have siblings.”

Mam brata.
“I have a brother.”

Mam dwie siostry.
“I have two sisters.”

4. Pets

Mam psa.
“I have a dog.”

Mam trzy koty.
“I have three cats.”

Nie mam żadnych zwierząt.
“I don’t have any pets.”


3. Context Matters: Learn about How to Introduce Yourself in Polish in Different Situations

Talking About Yourself

If you’re looking for a Polish self-introduction to sound like a native speaker, this section is just perfect for you!

1- Introductions When Dealing with Peers

What I enjoy about Polish is that it has a very distinct difference between what’s formal and informal. An informal way of introducing yourself in the Polish language will come in handy in situations where you’re asked to say a few words about yourself by a group of peers. This is an example of a nice, informal introduction:

Cześć! Jestem Jonas i mam 22 lata. Pochodzę z Niemiec. W wolnym czasie lubię słuchać muzyki i spędzać czas z moimi przyjaciółmi.

“Hi! I’m Jonas and I’m 22 years old. I come from Germany. In my free time, I like listening to music and hanging out with my friends.”

Such an introduction would work equally fine on the Internet, for instance, as a description of yourself on your dating profile or on an online expat community website when you’re trying to make friends. To avoid confusion, add one more line: Nie mówię dobrze po polsku meaning “I don’t speak Polish very well.” To be able to have longer chats with your peers, it’s a good idea to find out a bit more about pop and traditional culture.

2- Introducing Yourself to People Older Than You

Woman Talking to Older Woman

A formal way of introducing yourself in the Polish language is equally important. Especially when your partner is Polish, you may have to say a few words about yourself to his or her family when you meet them for the first time. Being able to do so in their native language will melt their hearts!

Bardzo miło mi Państwa poznać. Nazywam się Agnes i z zawodu jestem weterynarzem.
“It’s really nice to meet you all. My name is Agnes and I’m a veterinarian.”

Would you like to know beforehand what items you can expect in a Polish home? The PolishPod101 lesson “Inside the Polish Home” will come in handy!

3- Describing Yourself in Polish in a Work Environment

You may be asked to say a few words about yourself in a work environment. Here’s how to introduce yourself in Polish when someone puts you on the spot in a new workplace:

Witam wszystkich! Nazywam się Raul i pochodzę z Brazylii. Będę pracować tutaj jako programista.
“Hello everyone! My name is Raul and I come from Brazil. I’m going to work here as a programmer.”

As you can see, a good introduction requires a bit more than just saying “My name is” in Polish. Fortunately, we’ve got you covered!


4. Introducing Others

Finally, the last but not least important skill is learning how to introduce other people. This can be useful in both social situations and at work.

1- Introducing Others in a Social Situation

You can easily imagine a social situation when, for instance, you’ve brought a friend or your partner with you to a party. There are a few ways to introduce them to someone:

1. You can simply tell people each other’s names and indicate in their direction:

- Andrzej, Ivana. Ivana, Andrzej.

2. When introducing a friend or a partner, you can also tell people a bit about your relationship:

- Monika, poznaj moją dziewczynę Agatę.
- “Monika, please meet my girlfriend, Agata.”

- Tomek, to jest Wojtek z jogi, o którym tyle Ci opowiadałem.
- “Tomek, this is Wojtek from my yoga class I told you so much about.”

3. You can also opt for a fuller introduction, especially if you know that the two people have something in common:

- Maja, poznaj Marka. Marek, tak samo jak ty, uwielbia jazdę konną.
- “Maja, meet Marek. Marek, just like you, loves horse riding.”

2- Introducing Others at Work

Being able to introduce others at work is a very important skill, particularly for people working in HR departments and those in managerial positions in organizations. Here’s an example of how this can be done:

Czy mogę prosić wszystkich o uwagę? Chciałbym przedstawić wam Anję. Anja dołączy do naszego zespołu jako sekretarz spółki. Proszę, powitajmy ją serdecznie.

“Can I have everyone’s attention? I’d like you to meet Anja. Anja is joining our team in the role of company secretary. Let’s welcome her warmly.”


5. How to Get Better at Introducing Yourself and Others in Polish

Two Women Conversing

Interesting things happen in your brain when you learn a language. However, you only get better at it by practicing it.

Don’t wait until your Polish is perfect; start looking for opportunities to communicate as soon as possible. You don’t need to do a flawless introduction the first time around. To boost your confidence, keep a Polish dictionary with you.

Are you scared that people will make fun of you? That’s a natural concern. You can try working on your Polish pronunciation to make sure others understand you. Ask native speakers for help and tell them not to shy away from correcting you.

Last but not least, smile. It has great benefits and helps to win other people’s hearts.


6. Final Thoughts

We hope you can now see why in Polish language-learning, how to introduce yourself is so vital. You need to know how to introduce yourself to make your first connections with native speakers, and to gain confidence in Polish. Today, you’ve learned how to describe yourself and introduce others.

With PolishPod101.com, you can truly polish your Polish skills (pun intended). There are many language tools around, but this one has been growing for over a decade. Can the users who’ve downloaded millions of lessons be wrong? When you learn Polish with PolishPod101.com, you get:

- Video presentations with native speakers
- 24/7 access to learning materials
- Innovative pronunciation tool
- New and dynamic content
- Premium PLUS option with a personal tutor available 24/7

Start learning by creating a free account now! With our constant support and your determination, you’ll be able to introduce yourself and speak Polish fluently before you know it!

But before you go: Let us know in the comments how you feel about introducing yourself in Polish now! Is there anything in particular you’re still struggling with? We love hearing from you, so don’t be afraid to reach out! :)
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Smigus Dyngus Day: Easter Monday in Poland

The time has come to talk about Poland’s second most popular holiday: Easter. Easter Monday in Poland is not only a religious celebration, but a secular holiday enjoyed by the whole population! The Monday after Easter, called Easter Monday (or Smigus Dyngus Day in Poland), is full of Polish culture for you to discover with us.

At PolishPod101.com, we hope to make learning about Poland and the Polish language both fun and informative! And trust us: in Poland, Wet Monday is certainly fun!

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1. What is Easter Monday in Poland?

On Wet Monday, Poland enjoys both a religious holiday and a day of fun!

The Easter Monday holiday in Poland is a family celebration; it is a joyful and colorful time of year, when people in Poland look forward to the upcoming spring. Further, it’s a time to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus; for those who are less religious, it’s a time to meet with their family, eat Easter breakfast together, have fun decorating eggs, and prepare special dishes.

2. When is Easter Monday?

Holy Water and Cross

The date of Easter Monday in Poland varies each year. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

  • 2019: April 22
  • 2020: April 13
  • 2021: April 5
  • 2022: April 18
  • 2023: April 10
  • 2024: April 1
  • 2025: April 21
  • 2026: April 6
  • 2027: March 29
  • 2028: April 17

3. Reading Practice: How is Easter Celebrated in Poland?

People Having a Water Fight

What do Easter Monday Polish traditions look like? Read the Polish text below to find out, and learn why it’s often called Wet Monday (and find the English translation directly below it).

Jedną z wielu tradycji jest przygotowanie święconki, czyli koszyczka, zwykle wiklinowego, z chlebem, jajkami, kiełbasą i chrzanem czy musztardą, przyozdobionego wiosennymi kwiatami i bukszpanem. Taki oto koszyczek niesiemy, w przeddzień Wielkanocy, do kościoła, gdzie zostaje on poświęcony przez księdza. W Niedzielę Wielkanocną zanim zasiądziemy do świątecznego śniadania wszyscy domownicy dzielą się święconką, życząc sobie szczęścia i pomyślności.

Czymś, co ściśle wiąże się z Wielkanocą, są pisanki. W Polsce istnieje wiele tradycyjnych metod ozdabiania czy też farbowania jajek, które przetrwały do dziś. Pisanki to dokładnie jajka, na których rysuje się wzory za pomocą rozgrzanego wosku i następnie zanurza w barwnikach. Kraszanki natomiast, to jajka gotowane w roślinnych wywarach. Niegdyś Kościół zabraniał spożywania jajek w Wielkanoc, jako, że było ono pogańskim symbolem nowego życia.

Tym, czego nie może zabraknąc na wielkanocnym stole, poza pisankami, są wszelkiego rodzaju potrawy wykorzystujące jajka, żurek, biała kiełbasa, pasztet, najlepiej jeśli domowej roboty, oraz pascha, mazurek i babka. Sam stół jest zawsze przyozdobiony zajączkami, kurczaczkami, baziami, narcyzami, tulipanami i innymi wiosennymi kwiatami.

W Polsce kolorowe jajka nie służą tylko do ozdoby, ale również do zabawy. Prawdopodobnie najpopularniejsza gra polega na stuknięciu jednym z końców jajka o koniec jajka przeciwnika. Ten, którego jajko nie pęknie jest zwycięzcą i zabiera jajko przegranego. Walka trwa aż oba końce jajka pękną. Każde wygrane jajko należy zjeść na szczęście.

One of the many traditions is to prepare the swieconka, which is a basket usually made of wicker, filled with bread, eggs, sausage, and horseradish or mustard, and decorated with spring flowers and boxwood. On the day before Easter, we carry these baskets to the church, where they are blessed by the priest. On Easter Sunday, before we sit down to a festive breakfast, all household members share the blessed food and wish each other happiness and prosperity.

One thing that is closely associated with Easter is pisanki (”Easter eggs”). In Poland, many traditional methods of decorating and dyeing eggs have survived to this day. Pisanki are eggs that have patterns drawn on them with molten wax and are then immersed in dye. Kraszanki, on the other hand, are eggs that are boiled in a dye made from plants. In the past, the Church forbade the eating of eggs during Easter, as they were a pagan symbol of a new life.

One thing that can’t be missing from the Easter table, besides Easter eggs, are a few different kinds of dishes, which include eggs, sour rye soup, white sausage, pate (which is best if homemade), as well as pascha, mazurek and babka (which are both cakes). The table itself is always decorated with bunnies, chicks, catkins, narcissus, tulips, and other spring flowers.

In Poland, colored eggs are not just used for decoration, but also in games. Probably the most popular game is to tap one end of your egg against the end of an egg belonging to the opponent. The person whose egg does not break is the winner and takes the egg of the loser. The fight continues until both ends of the egg break. Each egg that has been won needs to be eaten for good luck.

4. Additional Information: Onion Skins

What is the most popular, traditional way of coloring eggs for Easter these days?

The most popular natural dye that eggs are boiled in to achieve the desired color, is one made of onion skin, which usually needs to be collected a long time before Easter. This dye gives the egg shells a beautiful golden-brown color.

5. Must-know Vocab

One Child Chasing Another

Here’s some vocabulary you should know for Easter Monday in Poland!

  • Śmigus-dyngus — Wet Monday
  • Lany Poniedziałek — Wet Monday
  • Oblewać wodą — Throw water
  • Psikus — Prank
  • Pistolet na wodę — Water gun
  • Uciekać — Run away
  • Woda święconaHoly water
  • Mokry — Wet
  • Zabawa — Fun
  • Zwyczaj — Custom
  • Czaić się — Lurk

To hear each word pronounced, check out our Polish Easter Monday vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio of its pronunciation.

Conclusion

What do you think about Wet Monday in Poland? Does your country have similar (or different) Easter celebrations? Let us know in the comments!

To learn more about Polish culture and the language, visit us at PolishPod101.com. We offer an array of insightful blog posts, free vocabulary lists, and an online community where you can discuss lessons with fellow Polish learners. By creating a Premium Plus account, you can also take advantage of our MyTeacher program, and learn Polish one-on-one with your own personal Polish teacher!

With enough hard work and determination, know that your Polish skills will improve tremendously. And PolishPod101.com will be here with you every step of the way!

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International Women’s Day in Poland: Happy Women’s Day!

In Poland, Women’s Day began to be celebrated on a large scale until after the Second World War. It has been skilfully used by the socialist governments to promote the image of a woman, as the leading lady of work, who through effort and dedication supports her country.

In those years, it was a mandatory day of celebration in workplaces and schools. Women would receive carnations and other products that were generally difficult to find back then, such as tights, towels, or coffee.

As you can see, International Women’s Day is an important holiday steeped in the country’s culture. Learn even more about this holiday with PolishPod101.com!

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1. What is International Women’s Day in Poland?

Taking place on 8 March, Women’s Day in Poland is essentially a day to celebrate and honor women for their achievements. International Women’s Day in Poland is both a day of gift-giving and of prompting greater respect for women in general, and is a holiday taken fairly seriously in Poland.

In Poland, International Women’s Day has historical and social implications that make it a widely observed holiday. Learn more about Women’s Day in Poland below.

2. When is it?

Woman Sitting at Table

Each year in Poland, International Women’s Day is celebrated on March 8.

3. How is International Women’s Day Celebrated in Poland?

Variety of Chocolates

Read the Polish text below to find out how Women’s Day in Poland is celebrated. You can find the English translation directly below it.

—–
Tradycja obdarowywania kobiet drobnymi upominkami czy kwiatami zachowała się do dziś. Obecnie najpopularniejszym prezentem jest tulipan. Kiedy kobiety spotykają mężczyzn w ten dzień, niezależnie od tego czy jest to szef, współpracownik, kolega czy tata, zwykle mogą liczyć na symbolicznego tulipana. Jest to bardzo miły gest, nie praktykowany jednak przez wszystkich. Niektórzy uważają bowiem Dzień Kobiet za socjalistyczny przeżytek i nie obchodzą go.

W miastach co roku organizowane są specjalne imprezy z myślą o kobietach. Można więc spędzić ten dzień trochę inaczej niż zwykle i wybrać się na jeden z licznych koncertów czy spektakli wystawianych tylko dzień 8 marca. Wiele centrów handlowych organizuje warsztaty, przeróżne pokazy, np. makijażu, kąciki z poradami od stylistów czy ekspertów w dziedzinach zdrowia i urody, królują również konkursy i szansy na wygranie bonów towarowych.

Często w większych miastach można spotkać młodych mężczyzn z naręczami tulipanów wręczajacych je nieznajomym kobietom na ulicach. Nierzadko takie akcje organizowane są również przez telewizje lub stacje radiowe.

—–

The tradition of giving women little gifts or flowers has survived to this day. Today, the most popular gift is the tulip. When women meet men on this day, regardless of whether it is their boss, colleague, friend, or father, they can usually count on receiving a symbolic tulip. It is a very nice gesture, but not practiced by all. Some people think that Women’s Day is a socialist hangover so they do not celebrate it.

Each year, in the cities, special events are organized with women in mind. So you can spend this day a little differently than usual and go to one of the many concerts or performances held only on March 8. Many shopping centers organize workshops and a variety of shows, such as make-up shows, booths with tips from stylists, or advice from experts in the fields of health and beauty. There are also plenty of contests and chances to win shopping vouchers.

Often in larger cities, you can find young men with bunches of tulips, handing them out to women on the streets. It’s fairly common for these events to be organized by television or radio stations as well.

4. Additional Information

Women’s Day was a public holiday in Poland during the Polish People’s Republic (PRL), but since 1993 it has not been. However, this doesn’t change the fact that this is an opportunity to spend the day a little differently than usual.

5. Must-know Vocab

Woman Speaking Through Airhorn

Here’s some vocabulary you should know for International Women’s Day in Poland!

  • Dzień Kobiet — Women’s Day
  • Matka — Mother
  • CzekoladaChocolate
  • Kobieta — Woman
  • Bukiet kwiatów — Bouquet
  • Tulipan — Tulip
  • Prawo — Right
  • Dziewczyna — Girlfriend
  • Dawać — Give
  • Szacunek — Respect
  • Równouprawnienie kobietWomen’s empowerment

To hear each vocabulary word pronounced, visit our Polish International Women’s Day vocabulary page. Here you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio of its pronunciation.

Conclusion

We hope you enjoyed learning about Polish International Women’s Day with us. Does your country celebrate International Women’s Day or another holiday celebrating and respecting women? Let us know in the comments!

To learn more about Polish culture and the language, visit us at PolishPod101.com! We offer an array of insightful blog posts, free vocabulary lists, and an online community to discuss lessons with fellow Polish learners. You can also check out our MyTeacher program if you’re interested in a one-on-one learning experience with your own personal Polish teacher.

Until next time, we wish you success as you continue in your studies. Know this: Your hard work and practice will pay off big and you’ll be speaking Polish like a native before you know it!

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Tłusty Czwartek in Poland: How to Celebrate Polish Donut Day

It really is fascinating how a single holiday celebrated across different countries can vary so much, and how a country’s culture influences these nuances. For instance, Fat Thursday (or Tłusty Czwartek) could also be called Polish Donut Day in Poland while in Greece it’s more of a meat fest. Polish Americans often celebrate the day on Tuesday instead of Thursday though.

At PolishPod101.com, our goal is to help you grasp the Polish culture and master its language all while having fun. In this article, we’ll be going over Fat Thursday’s Polish history as well as
what Fat Thursday Polish traditions look like. By learning about this holiday, you’ll be getting a better understanding of Poland and its customs, thus enabling you to more effectively learn the language.

Let’s get started!

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1. What is Fat Thursday in Poland?

In Poland, Fat Thursday is not a national holiday, but that doesn’t prevent people from celebrating, and once again they do so with food! If you were to give this day another name, it would be Donut Day, or dzień pączka.

Fat Thursday is the Thursday before Lent, which a period of fasting and abstinence. It’s a common habit in many countries to hold gluttonous and entertaining holidays before Lent like this, and in Poland this means eating Polish donuts and other sweets until you’re stuffed! (Best to get your fill while you can!)

2. When is Fat Thursday?

This is a Moveable Feast

The date of Fat Thursday varies by year, and is considered a “moveable feast,” as it depends on the dates of Easter and Lent. Fat Thursday takes place the Thursday before Lent begins. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years:

  • 2019: February 28
  • 2020: February 20
  • 2021: February 11
  • 2022: February 24
  • 2023: February 16
  • 2024: February 8
  • 2025: February 27
  • 2026: February 12
  • 2027: February 4
  • 2028: February 17

3. How is Poland’s Fat Thursday Celebrated?

Eating Lots of Pastries

In short: Donuts, donuts, and more Polish donuts!

Fat Thursday ends the Carnival or karnawał—a time when masquerade balls take place in Poland, for both adults and children. This is the last day before Easter that people can take the liberty of stuffing themselves. Immediately after Fat Thursday, Lent begins.

As you may have guessed, Fat Thursday is a day of gluttony, or obżarstwo, but not just any kind of gluttony! This day is defined by donuts, called pączki. Donuts are made in cake shops in much, much greater amounts than usual. Supermarket shelves bend under the weight of different types of donuts, of which the Polish version don’t have holes in the middle. The most common type of donut is covered with icing sugar and has a strawberry or rose jam filling.

Besides eating them, Polish people also like to give them to other people. For example, the boss at work usually buys donuts for his or her employees, while the employees buy donuts for their colleagues. If you’re going to meet your friends on this day, buy a donut for everyone, because you’ll surely be getting one somewhere along the way!

4. Reading Practice: Polish Donuts

When we said “gluttony” earlier, we weren’t kidding. Read the Polish text below to find out how many donuts are consumed in Poland on Fat Thursday, and about the unique Polish pastry called angel wings (you can find the English translation just below it).

—–
Drugim bardzo popularnym elementem, tym razem domowej roboty, są faworki. Jest to jedyny dzień w roku, kiedy smażymy faworki, bo wymagają dużo pracy, a zjada się je w mgnieniu oka!

W Polsce uważamy, że każdy, ale to każdy, bez wyjątku musi zjeść przynajmniej jednego pączka. Statystyki mówią, że w Tłusty Czwartek zjadamy ponad 10 milionów pączków, co daje nam średnio 2,5 pączka na osobę.

—–

Another very popular element—homemade this time—are angel wings. This is the only day of the year that we make angel wings because they require a lot of work, and we eat them in the blink of an eye!

We believe in Poland that everyone, literally everyone, without exception, must eat at least one donut. Statistics show that we eat more than ten million donuts on Fat Thursday, which averages out to 2.5 donuts per person.

5. Must-know Vocab for Tłusty Czwartek

Upcoming Lent Holiday

In order to celebrate Fat Thursday in Poland, there’s some basic vocabulary you should know. Be sure to study this list as much as you need to!

  • Tłusty Czwartek — Fat Thursday
  • cukiernia — confectionary store
  • cukier puder — castor sugar
  • faworki — Angel wings
  • lukier — icing
  • objadać się — stuff oneself
  • pączek — doughnut
  • pączek z dżemem różanym — doughnut with rose jam
  • święto ruchome — moveable feast
  • smażyć na głębokim tłuszczu — deep fry
  • kaloria — calorie
  • Wielki Post — Lent
  • smakołyk — goody

To hear the pronunciation of each word, check out our Polish Fat Thursday vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio of its pronunciation.

Conclusion

Now that you know more about how people in Poland celebrate Fat Thursday, let us know what you think about this holiday. Is there a similar holiday in your own country?

To learn more about Polish culture and the language, visit us at PolishPod101.com. We offer an array of insightful blog posts, free vocabulary lists, and an online community where you can discuss lessons with fellow Polish learners. You can even download our MyTeacher app for a one-on-one learning experience with your own personal Polish teacher.

We hope you enjoyed learning about Fat Thursday. Continue brushing up on your vocabulary and stay tuned for more Polish holiday articles. You’ll be a master at the Polish language before you know it! (And treat yourself to a doughnut or two to celebrate!)

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How to Say I Love You in Polish - Romantic Word List

Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Polish could be just what you need to find it.

Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Polish partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At PolishPod101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Polish lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Polish dating easy for you.

Table of Contents

  1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
  2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
  3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
  4. Polish Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
  5. Polish Quotes about Love
  6. Marriage Proposal Lines
  7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
  8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Polish Faster?

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1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

So, you have met your Polish love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Polish word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Polish date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

Polish Date Phrases

Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

  • Pójdziesz ze mną na kolację?

The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Polish is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

Are you free this weekend?

  • Jesteś wolna w ten weekend?

This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

Would you like to hang out with me?

  • Chciałabyś coś razem porobić?

You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

What time shall we meet tomorrow?

  • O której się jutro spotykamy?

Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

Where shall we meet?

  • Gdzie się spotkamy?

You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

You look great.

  • Wyglądasz świetnie.

A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

You are so cute.

  • Jesteś taka śliczna.

If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

What do you think of this place?

  • Co sądzisz o tym miejscu?

This another good conversation starter. Show off your Polish language skills!

Can I see you again?

  • Czy mogę cię znów zobaczyć?

So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

Shall we go somewhere else?

  • Chcesz iść gdzieś indziej?

If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

I know a good place.

  • Znam dobre miejsce.

Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

I will drive you home.

  • Będę jechać do domu.

If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

That was a great evening.

  • To był wspaniały wieczór.

This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

When can I see you again?

  • Kiedy mogę cię znów zobaczyć?

If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

I’ll call you.

  • Zadzwonię do ciebie.

Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

You learned all the Polish phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Polish below!

Date Ideas in Polish

museum

  • muzeum

If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

candlelit dinner

  • kolacja przy świecach

A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

go to the zoo

  • iść do zoo

This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

go for a long walk

  • pójść na długi spacer

Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

go to the opera

  • iść do opery

This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

go to the aquarium

  • iść do akwarium

Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

walk on the beach

  • spacerować po plaży

This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

have a picnic

  • urządzić piknik

If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

cook a meal together

  • ugotować posiłek

If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

have dinner and see a movie

  • zjeść kolację i obejrzeć film

This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

Valentine's Day Words in Polish

Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Polish - think how impressed your date will be!

4. Polish Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Polish yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Polish? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Polish love on this special day!

Valentine's Day Words in Polish

I love you.

  • Kocham cię.

Saying ‘I love you’ in Polish carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

You mean so much to me.

  • Znaczysz dla mnie tak wiele.

This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

Will you be my Valentine?

  • Będziesz moją Walentynką?

With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

You’re so beautiful.

  • Jesteś taka piękna.

If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Polish, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

I think of you as more than a friend.

  • Jesteś dla mnie kimś więcej niż tylko przyjacielem.

Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Polish dating culture.

A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

  • Sto serc to zbyt mało, żeby pomieścić całą miłość, jaką do ciebie czuję.

You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

Love is just love. It can never be explained.

  • Miłość to po prostu miłość, nie można jej wytłumaczyć.

If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

You’re so handsome.

  • Jesteś taki przystojny.

Ladies, this phrase lets your Polish love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

I’ve got a crush on you.

  • Podobasz mi się.

If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

You make me want to be a better man.

  • Sprawiasz, że chcę być lepszym człowiekiem.

Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Polish girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

Let all that you do be done in love.

  • Niech wszystko co robisz, będzie robione w miłości.

We hope.

You are my sunshine, my love.

  • Jesteś moim słońcem, moją miłością.

A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

Words can’t describe my love for you.

  • Mojej miłości do ciebie nie da się wyrazić słowami.

Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

We were meant to be together.

  • Jesteśmy sobie przeznaczeni.

This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

  • Jeśli myślałeś o kimś, gdy to czytałeś, to bez wątpienia jesteś zakochany.

Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

5. Polish Quotes about Love

Polish Love Quotes

You’re a love champ! You and your Polish lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Polish that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

6. Marriage Proposal Lines

Polish Marriage Proposal Lines

Wow. Your Polish lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Polish custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

Polish Break-Up Lines

Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • Musimy porozmawiać.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • To nie ty. To ja.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Polish lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • Ja po prostu nie jestem gotowy na tego rodzaju związek.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • Pozostańmy tylko przyjaciółmi.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Polish, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • Myślę, że musimy sobie zrobić przerwę.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • Zasługujesz na coś lepszego.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • Powinniśmy zacząć spotykać się z innymi ludźmi.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • Potrzebuję trochę przestrzeni.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • Myślę, że to się dzieje za szybko.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • Muszę się skupić na mojej karierze.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • Nie jestem wystarczająco dobry dla Ciebie.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • Ja po prostu cię już nie kocham.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • My po prostu nie jesteśmy dla siebie stworzeni.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • Tak będzie lepiej.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • Oddaliliśmy się od siebie.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Polish faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. PolishPod101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Polish language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Polish Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Polish speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    PolishPod101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Polish, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Polish even faster.

    2- Having your Polish romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Polish language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Polish lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Polish partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why PolishPod101 helps you learn Polish Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Polish

    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Polish is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at PolishPod101 is translated into both English and Polish. So, while your partner can help you learn Polish faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Polish Culture
    At PolishPod101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Poland. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Polish partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Polish Phrases
    You now have access to PolishPod101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Polish soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    Secret Revealed: The Best Way to Learn a Language on Your Own

    Learning A Language on Your Own

    Can You Really Learn Polish Alone?

    Learning a language on your own or without traditional classroom instruction may seem quite daunting at first. What if you run into questions? How do you stay motivated and on track to achieving goals?

    Don’t worry, not only is it possible to learn Polish or any language without traditional classroom instruction: PolishPod101 has created the world’s most advanced and extensive online language learning system. Not only is PolishPod101 specifically designed to help you with learning a language on your own, it’s actually faster, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom options!

    Let’s look at some of the benefits of learning Polish or any language alone.

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    Also, don’t forget to download your free cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills too!

    3 Reasons to Learn a Language Alone

    Learning Alone

    1. Learn at Your Own Pace and On Your Schedule

    In today’s fast-paced world, there just isn’t time for traditional classroom instruction. Between getting to class and studying on some professor or teacher’s schedule, traditional classroom learning is simply impossible to fit in. But when you learn Polish alone, you can study in bed if you like and whenever suits your schedule best, making it far easier to actually reach your goal of learning and mastering the language.

    2. Learning a Language on Your Own Reduces Stress and Anxiety

    Speaking in front of a class, pop quizzes, and tests are just a few of the stressors you will encounter when you learn a language in a traditional classroom setting. Specifically, these are external stressors that often derail most people’s dream of learning a new language. But when you learn Polish alone, there are no external stressors. Without the external stress and anxiety, it becomes much easier and more exciting to study Polish and reach your very own goals—all on your own!

    3. Learning Polish Alone Helps Improve Cognitive Function and Overall Success

    Learning a language on your own is indeed more challenging in some ways than being taught in a traditional classroom setting. In fact, while classroom instruction requires more rote memorization and following instructions, studying a language on your own requires more problem-solving and higher cognitive function to self-teach lessons and hit goals. So while it’s more challenging and requires higher levels of cognition, teaching yourself a language pays dividends throughout life by better preparing you for social/work opportunities that arise.

    How to Learn a Language on Your Own with PolishPod101

    Learning with PolishPod101

    1. Access to the World’s Largest Collection of Polish Audio & Video Lessons

    The best way to learn a language on your own is to study from native speaking instructors. Ideally, you want audio and/or video lessons that teach vocabulary, grammar, and provide actual Polish conversations and dialogue to help you with pronunciation. PolishPod101 has hundreds of hours of HD audio and video lessons created by real Polish instructors and every lesson is presented by professional Polish actors for perfect pronunciation. Plus, all lessons can be accessed 24/7 via any mobile device with Internet access. And, if you download the PDF versions of each lesson, you can even study without Internet access once the lesson is stored on your device!

    2. “Learning Paths” with Polish Courses Based Upon Your Exact Needs & Goals

    Although PolishPod101 has more than thousands of video and audio lessons, you need not review each and every one to learn the language. In fact, PolishPod101 has developed a feature called “Learning Paths”. You simply tell us your goals and we will identify the best courses and study plan to help you reach them in the shortest time possible. So even though you are technically learning a language on your own, our team is always here to help and make sure you reach your goals FAST!

    3. Advanced Learning Tools Reduce Learning Time and Boost Retention

    When you have the right tools and Polish learning resources, it’s actually easy to teach yourself a language! In the past 10+ years, PolishPod101 has developed, tested, and refined more than 20 advanced learning tools to boost retention and reduce learning time, including:

    • Spaced Repetition Flashcards
    • Line-by-Line Dialogue Breakdown
    • Review Quizzes
    • Voice Recording Tools to Help Perfect Pronunciation
    • Teacher Feedback and Comments for Each Lesson
    • Polish Dictionary with Pronunciation
    • Free PDF Cheat Sheets
    • And Much More!

    Armed with our growing collection of advanced learning tools, it’s truly a breeze to learn Polish alone and reach your goals!

    Conclusion

    Learning a language on your own is not only possible, it’s actually easier and more beneficial for you than traditional classroom instruction. In fact, when you learn Polish on your own you can study at your own pace, eliminate stress, and actually increase cognitive function.

    PolishPod101 is the world’s most advanced online language learning system and a great resource to help you teach yourself a new language. With the world’s largest collection of HD audio and video lessons, more than 20 advanced learning tools, and customized “Learning Paths”, PolishPod101 makes learning a new language easier, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom instruction.

    And the best part is: With PolishPod101, you can study in bed, your car, or wherever you have a few spare minutes of time. Create your Free Lifetime Account now and get a FREE ebook to help “kickstart” your dream of learning a language on your own below!

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    Language Learning Tips: How to Avoid Awkward Silences

    Avoid Awkward Silences

    Yes, even beginners can quickly learn conversational Polish well enough to carry on real conversations with native speakers. Of course, beginners won’t be able to carry a conversation the same way they could in their native language. But, just knowing a few tips like which questions to ask to keep a conversation going are all you need to speak and interact with real native speakers! But before we get to specific suggestions, let’s first take a closer look at how having real Polish conversations is so vital to your mastery of the language.

    Learning to Carry a Conversation is Vital to Mastery of Any Language

    Communicating with other people is the very point of language and conversation is almost second nature in our native tongue. For beginners or anyone learning a new language, conversations aren’t easy at all and even simple Polish greetings can be intimidating and awkward.

    However, there are 3 vital reasons why you should learn conversational Polish as quickly as possible:

    • Avoid Awkward Silences: Nothing kills a conversation faster than long periods of awkward silence, so you need practice and specific strategies to avoid them.
    • Improve the Flow of Conversation to Make a Better Impression: When you know what to say to keep a conversation going, communication becomes much easier and you make a better impression on your listener.
    • Master the Language Faster: Nothing will help you learn to speak Polish faster and truly master the language than having real conversations with native speakers. Conversations quickly expose you to slang, cultural expressions, and vocabulary that force you to absorb and assimilate information faster than any educational setting—and that’s a great thing!

    But how can you possibly have real conversations with real Polish people if you are just starting out?

    3 Conversation Strategies for Beginners

    Conversation

    1. Ask Questions to Keep a Conversation Going

    For beginners and even more advanced speakers, the key is to learn to ask questions to keep a conversation going. Of course, they can’t be just random questions or else you may confuse the listener. But, by memorizing a few key questions and the appropriate time to use them, you can easily carry a conversation with minimal vocabulary or experience. And remember, the more Polish conversations you have, the quicker you will learn and master the language!

    2. Learn Core Vocabulary Terms as Quickly as Possible

    You don’t need to memorize 10,000’s of words to learn conversational Polish. In fact, with just a couple hundred Polish words you could have a very basic Polish conversation. And by learning maybe 1,000-2,000 words, you could carry a conversation with a native speaker about current events, ordering in restaurants, and even getting directions.

    3. Study Videos or Audio Lessons that You Can Play and Replay Again and Again

    If you want to know how to carry a conversation in Polish, then you need exposure to native speakers—and the more the better. Ideally, studying video or audio lessons is ideal because they provide contextualized learning in your native language and you can play them again and again until mastery.

    PolishPod101 Makes it Easier and More Convenient Than Ever to Learn Conversational Polish

    Learning Polish

    For more than 10 years, PolishPod101 has been helping students learn to speak Polish by creating the world’s most advanced online language learning system. Here are just a few of the specific features that will help you learn conversational Polish fast using our proven system:

    • The Largest Collection of HD Video & Audio Lessons from Real Polish Instructors: PolishPod101 instructors have created hundreds of video and audio lessons that you can play again and again. And the best part is: They don’t just teach you Polish vocabulary and grammar, they are designed to help you learn to speak Polish and teach you practical everyday topics like shopping, ordering, etc!
    • Pronunciation Tools: Use this feature to record and compare yourself with native speakers to quickly improve your pronunciation and fluency!
    • 2000 Common Polish Words: Also known as our Core List, these 2,000 words are all you need to learn to speak fluently and carry a conversation with a native speaker!

    In all, more than 20 advanced learning tools help you quickly build vocabulary and learn how to carry a conversation with native speakers—starting with your very first lesson.

    Conclusion

    Although it may seem intimidating for a beginner, the truth is that it is very easy to learn conversational Polish. By learning a few core vocabulary terms and which questions to ask to keep a conversation going, just a little practice and exposure to real Polish conversations or lessons is all it really takes. PolishPod101 has created the world’s largest online collection of video and audio lessons by real instructors plus loads of advanced tools to help you learn to speak Polish and carry a conversation quickly.

    Act now and we’ll also include a list of the most commonly used questions to keep a conversation going so you can literally get started immediately!

    How to Transform Your Daily Commute Into Learning a Language

    Learn a language during your commute!

    Today, classrooms are no longer the only or even best place to learn a new language like Polish. More and more people are finding that they can easily learn a language just about anywhere they have a few minutes of spare time, including their daily commute to work. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average American spends over 50 minutes a day commuting to and from work, or over 300 hours a year.

    Rethinking Your Daily Commute to Work

    But rather than simply sitting in traffic and wasting the time, you can instead use your daily commute to literally learn Polish in just a few short months! PolishPod101 has developed specialized learning tools that you can use on your commute to work (and home again) to master the language in your spare time. Keep reading to learn how to get your free audiobook to use on your next commute so you can see for yourself how easy it is to transform “dead time” into realizing your dream of learning a new language!

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    But before we look at how to transform your commute home into a mini-classroom, let’s take a closer look at 4 reasons why traditional classroom settings just aren’t the best option for most people in today’s fast-paced world.

    • Difficulty Getting to and From Class
    • Learning on Someone Else’s Schedule
    • Very Expensive and May Cost $1,000’s to Complete
    • Can Take Years to Finally Complete Classes and Learn the Language

    The simple truth is that traditional classroom instruction is simply not a viable option for most people in today’s very fast-paced, time-starved world. Now let’s examine how you can learn a language faster, more easily, and at far less expense than traditional classes—all during your commute to work and back home again!

    Bus

    3 Reasons Your Daily Commute Can Help You Master a Language

    1. The Average Commute Time is More than 300 Hours Per Year

    Between the commute to work and getting back home again, over 6 hours a week is completely wasted and not helping you reach any goals or objectives. But thanks to online language learning platforms with audiobooks and other resources that you can access during your commute, you can easily transform wasted time into tangible progress towards learning a new language. With over 300 hours available annually, your daily commute could provide you with enough time to literally master a new language each and every year!

    2. Increase Your Earning Potential While Commuting to Work

    How would you like to transform all those spare commuting hours each week into more money for a new car, house, or even a dream vacation? According to research, someone making $30,000 per year can boost their annual income by $600 or more per year by learning a second language. Added up over the course of a lifetime, you can boost your total earnings by $70,000 or more while achieving your dream of learning a new language during your daily commute!

    How? From work-at-home translation jobs to working overseas, there are many ways to leverage your second language into more money in your bank account! So instead of wasting your precious time, you can make your commute more productive and profitable and the more languages you learn, the higher your income potential.

    3. Repetition is Key to Mastering a New Language

    Not sure if it’s practical to learn another language while commuting to and from work each day? Well not only is it possible—learning in your car on the way to and from work each day can actually help you learn and master Polish or any language much faster! The simple truth is that repetition is absolutely vital to truly internalizing and mastering any language. So, if you listen to audiobooks or even audio lessons on your commute to work and then repeat the same lesson on your commute home, the information is more likely to be “locked-in” to your long-term memory!

    Learning

    5 Ways PolishPod101 Makes It Easy to Learn a Language On Your Commute

    PolishPod101 has been helping people just like yourself learn and master Polish in the comfort of their home, during their daily commute, or any place they have a few minutes of spare time. Here are five features provided by PolishPod101 that make it easy to learn a new language while commuting to and from work:

    1. The Largest Collection of Audio Lessons on Planet by Native Speaking Instructors
    Every single week, PolishPod101 creates new audio lessons by native speaking instructors. All lessons are short, to the point, and guaranteed to improve your mastery of Polish.

    2. Word of the Day
    Simply exposing yourself to new information and vocabulary terms helps increase your fluency and mastery of Polish. So every single day, PolishPod101 adds a new Word of the Day for you to learn and memorize during your commute.

    3. Daily Dose Mini-Lessons
    Have a short commute to work but still want to make progress towards learning and mastering Polish? Not a problem! Our Daily Dose Mini-Lessons are 1-minute or less and designed to improve your grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation.

    4. All Content Available on a Convenient Mobile App
    You don’t need a PC or tablet to learn Polish during your daily commute. At PolishPod101, all of our lessons, tools, and resources are available 24/7 via our Mobile App. That means you can access all of our audio lessons and other tools during your commute to work or any time you have a few spare moments!

    5. Audiobooks and Other Supplemental Resources
    In addition to the world’s largest online collection of HD audio lessons, PolishPod101 has also created several audiobooks to enhance your understanding and make it more convenient than ever to learn a language during your commute!

    Conclusion

    The average commute time of most Americans is over 300 hours each year and it’s the perfect opportunity to learn and master a new language. In fact, you can use the “dead time” during your daily commute to learn a new language and potentially boost your lifetime earnings by up to $70,000 or more! Whatever your motivation, PolishPod101 has the tools and resources necessary to help you learn a new language each year during your commute to and from work. Act now and we’ll even provide you with a free audiobook to try out on your next commute!

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    How To Say ‘Hello’ in Polish, and Other Polish Greetings!

    How to Say Hello in Polish

    So, you’re heading for Poland to travel or work. Awesome! You’re in for an amazing adventure! It’s a beautiful country, steeped in a rich culture that may be very unlike your own.

    However, showing respect to the locals is a big deal in every country around the world. A respectful manner and attitude could open doors for you that would otherwise remain mystifyingly closed. Aside from just knowing ‘Thank you’ in Polish, greeting someone correctly in Polish could incline a local to treat you more favorably than otherwise! So, the clever thing to do would be to learn Polish greetings before you embark on your journey. Polish greetings are different from other languages and probably not what you’d expect. But if learning how to say ‘Hello!’ in Polish in easy and fun ways is important to you, you’ve come to the right place at PolishPod101.

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    1. Must-Know Polish Greetings

    Start straight away with this greeting lesson. It’s short, but it packs a punch!

    This short, but powerful lesson teaches you the basic ways to greet someone correctly in Polish! At PolishPod101, you will be taught the correct pronunciation and intonation, as well as the correct times to greet in Polish. And you will have fun!

    The focus of this lesson is Greetings in Polish

    Topic 1: Greetings - “Hello”

    Sentence from the lesson:

    ‘Cześć’
    “Hello (Informal Greeting)”

    Cześć means “Hi” or “Hello.” Another informal greeting is Siema! This phrase also means “Hi,” but it is only used by young people. Besides, Hej! Hej! is very common. It’s exactly the same as English “Hey.”

    For Example:

    Dzień dobry! Dobry wieczór!
    “Good day,” “Good evening” (Formal Greetings)

    Topic 2: Greetings - “good-bye”

    Sentence from the lesson:

    ‘Pa pa!’
    “Good-bye (informal)”

    In formal situations, Polish people usually say Do widzenia! when leaving. Do widzenia means “Good-bye.”

    Language Tip!

    Siema is an abbreviation of Jak się masz, which means “How are you?,” but we just use it in the same way as “Hi.” It’s a very common greeting among young people. You will find, as you continue to study Polish, that new greetings constantly appear among young people, who often come up new uses for well-known phrases—or their abbreviations.

    2. Common Ways to Say Hello in Polish

    Polish Greetings

    Standing at the airport in a foreign country for the first time can be a somewhat scary experience for anyone, especially if you need assistance. However, don’t worry - at PolishPod101 we teach you how to quickly get a local’s attention with friendly, correct Polish greetings! You are more likely to get helped this way.

    Here is our Polish greetings list of all the general ways to address a person upon meeting. It is tailored for formal and informal situations.

    1- Good morning.

    Dzień dobry.

    ‘Good morning’ in Polish is acceptable any time between approximately 5:30am and 12:00pm, when the day is still young. And smile - it’s the universal ice-breaker!

    2- Good evening

    Dobry wieczór.

    This greeting is one you would use casually when night begins to fall. Address your friends, close family or close acquaintances, and those who are not your superiors, with this phrase.

    3- How are you?

    Jak się masz?

    Show your friendly interest in another person’s well-being by asking this question. This is the casual greeting form that you would use with your friends and family. For the sake of the friendship, it would be good to listen carefully to the answer! It shows caring and selflessness on your part.

    4- How have you been?

    Co u ciebie?

    This is a good question to ask someone you have not seen for a while. The inference is that some catching-up is needed!

    5- What’s up?

    Jak tam?

    An universally informal and energetic way to greet your friends or equals! Literally, it means ‘What’s going on in your life?’, yet often no answer is expected. It’s just a greeting! Crazy, right?!

    6- Long time no see.

    Dawno się nie widzieliśmy.

    This phrase means is another greeting comment that means “I have not seen you for a while!” Often, no response is expected, except to reciprocate.

    7- Hey!

    Hej!

    This is a friendly exclamation to greet your friends or equals with. Reserve its use more for people you see regularly!

    Saying Hello

    8- Good afternoon.

    Dzień dobry.

    ‘Good afternoon’ in Polish is an informal greeting and is used during the second part of the day. The appropriate period falls, in most cultures, from 12:00am till sunset.

    9- How’s it going?

    Jak leci?

    This greeting phrase basically means the same as ‘How are things progressing?’, ‘How are things going in your life?’ or even ‘What’s up?’ Depending on the friendship, a lengthy answer is not always expected.

    10- It’s nice to see you again.

    Miło cię widzieć.

    This friendly, welcoming phrase is best used after greeting someone you have not seen for a while. If you mean it, you will make the person feel special! This is a good thing to say to make someone feel welcome in Polish.

    11- How’s everything?

    Jak leci?

    This is a variation of ‘How’s it going?’ Use casually with your equals or close acquaintances.

    12- How’s your day?

    Jak leci?

    Ask this when you’re speaking to your Polish friend during the day. It’s a friendly phrase to start a conversation with.

    13- Yo!

    Siema!

    Yo! is English slang and a universal greeting popular among young men of most nationalities. Rather don’t answer the phone with this, unless you know your caller well!

    14- Hello!

    Cześć!

    Suitable for use in most settings, situations and persons, this is an important Polish greeting to know. Be sure to master this word first at PolishPod101!

    15- It’s nice to meet you.

    Miło cię poznać.

    When meeting someone for the first time, this is a polite and friendly way to welcome them. It means you are happy to make their acquaintance.

    3. Why Should You Choose PolishPod101 To Learn How To Greet In Polish?

    Online learning systems abound, and it’s not easy to know which one will suit your needs best. This means you have to be careful and select a system with a good reputation, and that has proven longevity. PolishPod101, which is part of InnovativeLearning.com, ticks all the boxes! With millions of lesson downloads and over a decade of teaching, we can say with confidence that this is one of the best language learning systems on the web. Why is it such an excellent system? Let us count the ways…

    Polish Teacher

    1- Video Presentations with Native Speakers

    Friendly native Polish speakers guide you step-by-step through the process of learning vocabulary, phrases and much more. They demonstrate correct pronunciation and emphasis of the words, so as to ensure that you speak like a native when you’re done! Watching the enthusiastic tutors makes not only for a pleasant and more personal experience - it also allows you to copy mouth and lip movements. It’s like learning from your own Polish friend in your own home!

    2- Superb Flexibility with 24/7 Access to Learning Material - Anywhere and on Any Device connected to the Internet!

    PC, Android, iPhone, iPad, laptop, even TV - whatever device you prefer! Go online with our FREE app to do your lessons, no matter where you are or which device you are using. All you need is a good internet connection to log on and learn to speak Polish at your own pace, in your own place!

    3- Pronunciation Tool Ensures You Really Speak Polish!

    In any language, correct pronunciation is often crucial. The nuances in language require this, or you could find yourself saying things you don’t mean. You will find our Pronunciation Tool invaluable to wrap your mouth around the correct way to greet in Polish!

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    4- Our Content is Always New and Dynamic

    Every week, new audio and video lessons are uploaded, so as to keep our promise that learning Polish with PolishPod101 is always fun and exciting! In addition, you will get access to bonus material and basic Polish phrases. These are a fantastic way to build your comprehension and speaking skills!

    5- Need to Fast Track your Learning? We Have the Solution!

    Most learning activities are more fun when you’re not doing them alone. For this reason we developed Premium PLUS, which gives you a personal tutor - 24/7! Also, this way you’re likely to learn to speak Polish much faster!

    So, if our lively Polish blog is not enough for you, just upgrade to Premium PLUS to get your very own teacher. Personalised goals and lessons based on your needs, assessment of your progress, non-stop feedback and many other super features makes this a very attractive option.

    Say ‘Hello’ to a wonderful, exciting way to learn another language, and learn how to say ‘Hello’ in Polish in no time! You will be very happy you did!