Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hello everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Upper Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 8: Are You Afraid of Polish Dragons? I’m Brandon.
Marzena: And I’m Marzena.
Brandon: In this lesson, you'll learn different ways to say "I know" in Polish.
Marzena: This conversation takes place at a library.
Brandon: It’s between Tom and Jane.
Marzena: The speakers are friends, so they’ll be using informal Polish.
Brandon: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Jane: Znasz legendę o smoku wawelskim?
Tom: Nie znam. Wiem tylko, że jest jakiś smok w Krakowie.
Jane: Dokładnie. Wszyscy Polacy znają tę legendę.
Tom: To mi opowiedz jeśli ją znasz.
Brandon: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Jane: Znasz legendę o smoku wawelskim?
Tom: Nie znam. Wiem tylko, że jest jakiś smok w Krakowie.
Jane: Dokładnie. Wszyscy Polacy znają tę legendę.
Tom: To mi opowiedz jeśli ją znasz.
Brandon: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Jane: Znasz legendę o smoku wawelskim?
Brandon: Do you know the legend of the Wawel Dragon?
Tom: Nie znam. Wiem tylko, że jest jakiś smok w Krakowie.
Brandon: I don't know. I only know that there is some dragon in Cracow.
Jane: Dokładnie. Wszyscy Polacy znają tę legendę.
Brandon: Exactly. All Poles know this legend.
Tom: To mi opowiedz jeśli ją znasz.
Brandon: So tell me about it, if you know it too.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brandon: In the dialogue, Jane mentioned a legend.
Marzena: Yes, the legend of Wawel Dragon, in Polish called the legenda o smoku wawelskim.
Brandon: Is it famous?
Marzena: Oh yes, probably every Pole knows this story. A long, long time ago, when King Krakus ruled the city of Cracow, an evil dragon started living under his castle. The dragon devoured people and farm animals, so many knights tried to kill it, but no one could do it.
Brandon: What happened then?
Marzena: A poor cobbler claimed that he could kill the monster and he actually did. He outsmarted the dragon by making a fake sheep stuffed with sulfur and pitch, which is a petroleum residue. After eating the sheep, the dragon’s insides burst with fire.
Brandon: Is that how the dragon died?
Marzena: No, but to find that out you’ll have to check out the lesson notes!
Brandon: Okay, now let’s move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Marzena: legenda [natural native speed]
Brandon: legend
Marzena: legenda [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: legenda [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: smok [natural native speed]
Brandon: dragon
Marzena: smok [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: smok [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: wiedzieć [natural native speed]
Brandon: to know
Marzena: wiedzieć [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wiedzieć [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: tylko [natural native speed]
Brandon: just, only
Marzena: tylko [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: tylko [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: że [natural native speed]
Brandon: that
Marzena: że [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: że [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: wszyscy [natural native speed]
Brandon: everyone
Marzena: wszyscy [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wszyscy [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: opowiadać [natural native speed]
Brandon: to tell (a story)
Marzena: opowiadać [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: opowiadać [natural native speed]
: And Last:
Marzena: jeśli [natural native speed]
Brandon: if
Marzena: jeśli [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: jeśli [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. Marzena, what’s our first word?
Marzena: Legenda.
Brandon: Which means “Legend.”
Marzena: The main meaning of legenda is an old, but usually not true, story. It can also describe a list of symbols on a map or a person who is or was extremely famous.
Brandon: Let’s give our listeners a few sample sentences.
Marzena: Good idea. Let’s start with the basic meaning. For example, Kiedy byłam mała mama czytała mi przed spaniem legendy.
Brandon: “When I was small, my mom read me legends before I went to sleep.”
Marzena: Another example is, Ten gitarzysta jest żywą legendą.
Brandon: “This guitarist is a living legend.”
Marzena: For more sentence examples and details about the noun legenda, please check the lesson notes.
Brandon: Okay, what’s the next word?
Marzena: Opowiadać.
Brandon: “To tell;” as in, “to tell a story.”
Marzena: There are two interesting and popular sayings that Poles use which contain the verb opowiadać.
Brandon: What’s the first one?
Marzena: Opowiadać bajki, which literally means “to tell tales or fables.”
Brandon: But there’s nothing special about that expression.
Marzena: Oh there is, because we often say it when someone tells us an unbelievable thing, something we think isn’t true.
Brandon: It’s interesting! Listeners, there’s more in the lesson notes...
Marzena: ...so be sure to check them out!
Brandon: Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the verb that means “to know” in English. The reason we’ll talk only about this verb is because the English verb has two completely different Polish equivalents.
Marzena: It’s very important to know the difference between them in order to express yourself properly.
Brandon: Let’s start with the first version of “to know.”
Marzena: That’s znać. This verb belongs to the third conjugation pattern.
Brandon: If you don’t remember the conjugation pattern, be sure to review Lesson 4 of this series.
Marzena: Znać can be used when you’re talking about a person you’ve met before, like in the sentence Znam twojego szefa.
Brandon: Meaning, “I know your boss.”
Marzena: You can also use it to talk about something you’re familiar with, for example, Znam ten film, jest świetny!
Brandon: Meaning, “I know this movie; it’s great!”
Marzena: The last way to use znać is when you know something very well, in terms of your skills or knowledge. For example, Bardzo dobrze znam gramatykę języka angielskiego.
Brandon: “I know English grammar very well.”
Marzena: The second Polish verb meaning “to know” is wiedzieć.
Brandon: It belongs to the fourth conjugation pattern. You’ll find the conjugation table of this verb and all of the others in the lesson notes.
Marzena: The verb wiedzieć means...
Brandon: ..."to be aware of” or “to have knowledge about something."
Marzena: For example, Wiem jak to zrobić.
Brandon: Meaning, “I know how to do that.”
Marzena: Or, Wiem, że to nie prawda.
Brandon: Meaning, “I know it’s not true.”
Marzena: Listeners, remember that even though the verbs wiedzieć and znać are both translated as “to know” in English, they’re not interchangeable.

Outro

Brandon: And that’s going to do it for this lesson. Thanks for listening, everyone!
Marzena: And we’ll see you next time. Bye!
MARKETING PIECE
Marzena: Do you know the number 1 reason people don't study a second language?
Brandon: Not enough time.
Marzena: You’re very busy.
Brandon: We know. And that’s why we have one click lesson downloads on iTunes!
Marzena: Subscribe on iTunes.
Brandon: All Free materials will be automatically downloaded for each new lesson as they become available.
Marzena: Basic and premium members, get all access to bonus lesson materials too!
Brandon: Save time. Spend more time studying.
Marzena: Never worry about missing another lesson again!
Brandon: Go to iTunes, search with the phrase PolishPod101.com and click Subscribe.

9 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

PolishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hi Listeners! Do you like Polish legends? Which is your favorite?!

PolishPod101.comVerified
Friday at 5:40 pm
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Hi James Balicki,


Thank you for posting.

Wow, really? Was it smok wawelski? 😉


Best,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

James Balicki
Friday at 6:00 am
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I saw the dragon in Cracow back in August, 2001 :)

PolishPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 9:29 pm
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Hi Hetka


We use 'znać' not only for people. You can say 'znam Adama' meaning 'I know/have met Adam' but you can also say 'znam polski' - 'I know/speak Polish'. You can't say 'wiem o polskim' nor 'wiem polski' - it is not correct. 'Wiem' however - you are right here - always requires noun. You can say 'wiem o Adamie' - but that would have different meaning than 'znam Adama'. 'Wiem o Adamie' would mean that you are aware of his existence (for example if your friend was hiding that he has son named Adam and you found about it) or about some circumstances about Adam, for example if you find out that he broke his leg ('wiem o Adamie' meaning: 'I know that he broke his leg.').


I hope that helps!


Best:sunglasses:

Basia

Team PolishPod101.com

Hetka
Wednesday at 9:46 am
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Znac is for knowing someone and Wiem is for knowing about objects.

PolishPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 7:25 am
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Hi Sig


"Znać" is more stronger in meaning than "wiedzieć". The best description would be "to have the knowledge acquire".


Sincerely

Piotr

Team PolishPod101.com

Sig
Sunday at 9:38 am
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What determines whether to use znac or wiem? In this dialogue znac is used most of the time, however, I thought that "I don't know" is "Nie wiem," not "Nie snam"?

PolishPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 7:54 am
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Hi Sig


Thank you for your message. Are you referring to the following line? "To mi opowiedz jeśli ją znasz."

if so please not that the word used is "JĄ" not "JA". "Ja" indeed means "I" however "JĄ" means "hers" or "its". Please note that the letter is "Ą" which is pronounced quite differently from "A"


I hope that helps.


Sincerely

Piotr

Team PolishPod101.com

Sig
Wednesday at 7:42 am
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ja means "I", therefore doesn't the last line actually mean: "so I know"?