Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hello everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Upper Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 4: Tending To Your Polish Garden. I’m Brandon.
Marzena: And I’m Marzena.
Brandon: In this lesson, you'll learn about verb conjugation patterns.
Marzena: This conversation takes place at a cafe.
Brandon: It’s between Tom and Jane.
Marzena: Since the speakers are friends, they’ll be using informal Polish.
Brandon: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Tom: Kiedy Twoja babcia zaczyna pracę na działce?
Jane: Wczesną wiosną.
Tom: Ma tam tylko kwiaty, czy warzywa też?
Jane: Ma mnóstwo warzyw i owoców.
Tom: Na przykład?
Jane: Ziemniaki, marchewkę, pietruszkę, fasolę, bób, szczaw, kalarepę, sałatę, pomidory, itd.
Brandon: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Tom: Kiedy Twoja babcia zaczyna pracę na działce?
Jane: Wczesną wiosną.
Tom: Ma tam tylko kwiaty, czy warzywa też?
Jane: Ma mnóstwo warzyw i owoców.
Tom: Na przykład?
Jane: Ziemniaki, marchewkę, pietruszkę, fasolę, bób, szczaw, kalarepę, sałatę, pomidory, itd.
Brandon: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Tom: Kiedy Twoja babcia zaczyna pracę na działce?
Brandon: When does your grandma start work on her garden plot? (When does your grandma start work at her garden plot?)
Jane: Wczesną wiosną.
Brandon: Early spring.
Tom: Ma tam tylko kwiaty, czy warzywa też?
Brandon: Does she only have flowers there, or vegetables too?
Jane: Ma mnóstwo warzyw i owoców.
Brandon: She has lots of vegetables and fruits there.
Tom: Na przykład?
Brandon: For example?
Jane: Ziemniaki, marchewkę, pietruszkę, fasolę, bób, szczaw, kalarepę, sałatę, pomidory, itd.
Brandon: Potatoes, carrots, parsley, beans, fava beans, sorrel, kohlrabi, lettuce, tomatoes, etc.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brandon: In the dialogue, Tom mentioned garden plots. These aren’t like regular gardens, are they?
Marzena: That’s right. They’re not like the ones that people usually have around their houses. In Polish, a house garden is called ogród, but a działka is a community garden.
Brandon: What is that exactly?
Marzena: They’re land parcels, usually located on the outskirts of a city. Each of them is assigned to an individual person.
Brandon: What can you do there?
Marzena: Most people use them to grow their own fruits and vegetables, which often are much healthier than the ones we buy in the supermarkets. For others, it’s a leisure activity, and they don’t take it too seriously. It’s also a great place to hang out in the summer and enjoy eating barbecue, which Poles simply love.
Brandon: So, do younger people usually have community gardens?
Marzena: Quite the opposite. It’s usually the elder generation.
Brandon: That’s really interesting. Okay, now let’s move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Joanna: babcia [natural native speed]
Brandon: grandmother, grandma
Joanna: babcia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Joanna: babcia [natural native speed]
: Next:
Joanna: zaczynać się [natural native speed]
Brandon: to begin
Joanna: zaczynać się [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Joanna: zaczynać się [natural native speed]
: Next:
Joanna: wiosna [natural native speed]
Brandon: spring
Joanna: wiosna [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Joanna: wiosna [natural native speed]
: Next:
Joanna: kwiat [natural native speed]
Brandon: flower
Joanna: kwiat [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Joanna: kwiat [natural native speed]
: Next:
Joanna: warzywo [natural native speed]
Brandon: vegetable
Joanna: warzywo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Joanna: warzywo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Joanna: mnóstwo [natural native speed]
Brandon: plenty
Joanna: mnóstwo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Joanna: mnóstwo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Joanna: bób [natural native speed]
Brandon: fava bean
Joanna: bób [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Joanna: bób [natural native speed]
: Next:
Joanna: szczaw [natural native speed]
Brandon: sorrel
Joanna: szczaw [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Joanna: szczaw [natural native speed]
: Next:
Joanna: kalarepa [natural native speed]
Brandon: kohlrabi
Joanna: kalarepa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Joanna: kalarepa [natural native speed]
: And Last:
Joanna: sałata [natural native speed]
Brandon: lettuce
Joanna: sałata [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Joanna: sałata [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. Marzena, what’s our first word?
Marzena: Babcia.
Brandon: “Grandma.”
Marzena: It can also mean the more formal name “grandmother.” In Polish, we do not distinguish these two; it’s always just babcia.
Brandon: Do you use that word when you’re speaking to your grandma?
Marzena: If we talk about our grandma with another person who’s our family member, we use this word together with the grandma’s name. For example, babcia Ania.
Brandon: “Grandma Ania.”
Marzena: So, we use this mainly when we are talking about our own grandmother. It can be also used in reference to an old person who’s not related to us. For example, Jakaś babcia zemdlała na ulicy.
Brandon: “Some grandma fainted on the street.”
Marzena: For more information about both words, be sure to check out the lesson notes.
Brandon: Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn about verb conjugation patterns.
Marzena: This is very important because if you master the patterns, then conjugating verbs in Polish will become much easier.
Brandon: So let’s not waste any more time and get to it! First of all, you’ll have to memorize the characteristics of each conjugation pattern and which verbs belong to which pattern. Every pattern will give you information about what endings the verb takes.
Marzena: As long as you remember those, you’ll be able to conjugate every Polish verb without any problems.
Brandon: How do we do that?
Marzena: Well, don’t get discouraged, even if it sounds confusing. You’ll get used to it, believe me. So let’s get started. There are four basic conjugation patterns. The verbs that follow the first pattern take the ending -ę in the first person singular, -esz in the second, and -e in the third. Let’s use the verb chcieć as an example.
Brandon: This verb means “to want” and the first three forms are as follows:
Marzena: Chcę meaning “I want;” chcesz meaning “you want;” and chce meaning “he wants.”
Brandon: Since we’re focusing on the singular form in this lesson, please refer to the lesson notes for the plural forms, as well as more examples.
Marzena: The second conjugation pattern is when the verb takes -ę in the first person, -ysz or -isz in the second, and -y or -i in third.
Brandon: Let’s take the verb “to hear” as an example.
Marzena: The infinitive is słyszeć, and the conjugation forms are słyszę meaning “I hear;” słszysz meaning “you hear;” and słyszy meaning “he hears.”
Brandon: the verbs which follow the third conjugation pattern...
Marzena: ...take the ending -am in the first person singular, -asz in the second, and -a in the third. A verb belonging to this group is czekać.
Brandon: Meaning “to wait.”
Marzena: The forms are czekam meaning “I wait;” czekasz meaning “you wait;” and czeka meaning “he waits.”
Brandon: And finally, the fourth conjugation pattern.
Marzena: The verbs take the ending -em in the first person, -esz in the second, and -e in the third.
Brandon: Like the verb “to understand.”
Marzena: In Polish, rozumieć. The forms are rozumiem, meaning “I understand;” rozumiesz, meaning “you understand;” and rozumie, meaning “he understands.”

Outro

Brandon: Well, that’s all for this lesson. Don’t forget to check out the lesson notes! Thanks for listening...
Marzena: And we’ll see you next time.
MARKETING PIECE
Brandon: Attention perfectionists! You’re about to learn how to perfect your pronunciation.
Marzena: Lesson Review Audio Tracks.
Brandon: Increase fluency and vocabulary fast with these short, effective audio tracks.
Marzena: Super simple to use. Listen to the Polish word or phrase...
Brandon: then repeat it out loud in a loud clear voice.
Marzena: You’ll speak with confidence knowing that you’re speaking Polish like the locals.
Brandon: Go to PolishPod101.com, and download the Review Audio Tracks right on the lessons page today!

7 Comments

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PolishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hello Listeners! Do you have vegetables in your garden?

PolishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 9:56 pm
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Hi Robert,


Yes, you are right. "Pracę" in "Zaczynam pracę" is the accusative form of the noun "praca". It can be tricky, but you have got it right, congratulations! 😄


Kind regards,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Robert
Friday at 2:09 am
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Actually I think I can answer my own question: "pracę" is the accusative form of the noun "praca", not a conjugated verb. The first person singular form of "pracować" is actually "pracuję", in believe.

Robert
Wednesday at 3:26 am
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In "zaczyna pracę", why is "pracę" conjugated to the 1st person singular form? I've seen that before but no one has yet explained it to me. Why not "zaczyna pracować"?


Thanks.

PolishPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 7:51 am
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Hi guys


Thank you for your comments. Please be also informed that we are working on intermediate level too.

Hopefully we will be able to post this soon enough.


Sincerely

Piotr

Team PolishPod101.com

Antoinette Czerwinski
Monday at 11:53 pm
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I agree with Michelle; the jump from Beginner to Advance is not accessible.

Michelle
Monday at 6:44 pm
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Thanks for making this upper beginner level. I have done all the very beginner lessons but after trying the advance course I found that I can't understand at all. This upper beginner would help me a lot. Thanks!:smile: