Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner Season 1 Lesson 6 - Coming Up Short at a Polish Restaurant. Eric here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to order food. The conversation takes place at a restaurant.
Marzena: It's between Kasia and Felipe.
Eric: The speakers are co-workers, so they’ll be using informal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Kelner: Witam, co dla pani?
Kasia: Poproszę pierogi z kapustą i z grzybami.
Kelner: A dla pana?
Felipe: Poproszę pierogi ruskie.
: (później...)
Kasia: Poproszę rachunek. Czy można płacić kartą?
Kelner: Niestety nie.
Kasia: Felipe, masz gotówkę?
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Kelner: Witam, co dla pani?
Kasia: Poproszę pierogi z kapustą i z grzybami.
Kelner: A dla pana?
Felipe: Poproszę pierogi ruskie.
: (później...)
Kasia: Poproszę rachunek. Czy można płacić kartą?
Kelner: Niestety nie.
Kasia: Felipe, masz gotówkę?
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Waiter: Welcome, what can I get for you?
Kasia: Dumplings with sauerkraut and mushrooms, please.
Waiter: And for you sir?
Felipe: Russian dumplings, please.
: (later...)
Kasia: Check, please. Can I pay with a credit card?
Waiter: I'm sorry, but no.
Kasia: Felipe, do you have cash?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Marzena, what are some important things to know about Polish restaurants?
Marzena: Well, some things that are common for Poles may seem unusual to foreigners. For example, water isn’t free, it’s usually on the menu and you need to order it.
Eric: Oh, that’s good to know! What is the Polish word for “water”?
Marzena: “Mineral water” is woda mineralna and “sparkling water” or “soda water” is woda mineralna gazowana while niegazowana would mean “non-sparkling”.
Eric: Another thing that may puzzle you is that if you go to a Polish family restaurant, you may have to call the waiter over yourself and not wait for the staff to come. Marzena, are credit cards usually accepted?
Marzena: Yes, but it’s always better to check before placing your order.
Eric: What are the most common traditional dishes?
Marzena: Apart from the pierogi, which we’ve already talked about, you may want to try kotlet schabowy,
Eric: which is "fried pork cutlet," usually served with boiled potatoes and some salad.
Marzena: Right. Another traditional dish is rosół
Eric: Which is “clear chicken soup”
Marzena: or gołąbki
Eric: which is a "cabbage roll" with meat and rice filling, often served with tomato sauce. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Marzena: witam [natural native speed]
Eric: welcome, hello
Marzena: witam[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: witam [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: poprosić [natural native speed]
Eric: to ask someone for something
Marzena: poprosić[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: poprosić [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: pierogi z kapustą i grzybami [natural native speed]
Eric: dumplings with sauerkraut and mushrooms
Marzena: pierogi z kapustą i grzybami[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pierogi z kapustą i grzybami [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: rachunek [natural native speed]
Eric: check, bill
Marzena: rachunek[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: rachunek [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: móc [natural native speed]
Eric: can, to be able to
Marzena: móc[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: móc [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: płacić [natural native speed]
Eric: to pay
Marzena: płacić[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: płacić [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: karta [natural native speed]
Eric: card, credit card
Marzena: karta[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: karta [natural native speed]
Eric: And lastly..
Marzena: gotówka [natural native speed]
Eric: cash
Marzena: gotówka[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: gotówka [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at one of the words from this lesson. What is it?
Marzena: niestety
Eric: meaning "unfortunately."
Marzena: This particle expresses the speaker's regret that something is not what they’d hoped. It can be used in a sentence or it can stand alone as a reaction to something you’ve heard.
Eric: Can you give us an example?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say.. Niestety nie mogę ci pomóc.
Eric: ..which means "Unfortunately I can't help you." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about ordering food.
Marzena: At restaurants or cafes, you’ll probably always hear the same phrases when the waiter or waitress comes to take your order. If you’re a woman you’ll be asked Co dla pani?
Eric: meaning "What can I get you, ma'am?"
Marzena: If you’re a man, you’ll hear Co dla pana?
Eric: "What can I get you, sir?"
Marzena: If you’re a couple, it will be Co dla państwa?
Eric: "What can I get you, sir and ma'am?"
Marzena: Or more simply, Co podać?
Eric: "What can I get you?" This last one is less formal.
Marzena: Right, but it’s very common. When you’re ready to place your order, the word poproszę will come in handy. Every time you order something in Poland you’ll use poproszę, which means “please.”
Eric: The noun that follows, in other words what you’re ordering, has to be in the accusative case.
Marzena: Exactly. In the dialogue, Felipe said Poproszę pierogi ruskie,
Eric: meaning “Russian dumplings, please.”
Marzena: As you can see, the sentence started with the word poproszę, followed by the name of the dish, pierogi ruskie.
Eric: Before we see some examples, let’s have a look at the rules for the accusative forms, especially for Polish dish and drink nouns. Basically, for masculine, neuter and plural nouns, the accusative case is the same as the nominative case.
Marzena: Right. But for feminine nouns, the ending of the accusative case is -ę, even though the nominative is -a.
Eric: Let’s hear some examples
Marzena: Sure, for example rosół, which we know means “chicken soup,” is also rosół in the accusative case, because it’s a masculine noun.
Eric: The same rule applies to neuter and plural nouns.
Marzena: Right, for example mleko, meaning “milk,” is neutral and doesn’t change when it’s in the accusative case. The same for pierogi, which is a plural noun.
Eric: Now can you give us an example of a feminine noun?
Marzena: Yes, one that’s easy to remember is Coca-Cola, which in the accusative case becomes Coca-Col-ę. Another easy one is pizza which changes into pizz-ę.
Eric: Now let’s give some example sentences.
Marzena: For example, you can say Poproszę pizzę.
Eric: Meaning “Pizza, please.”
Marzena: Poproszę golonkę i piwo.
Eric: “Ham hock and beer, please.”
Marzena: In this case, golonkę is a feminine noun and piwo is neuter.
Eric: Now let’s switch to another topic that’s useful if you are at a restaurant. Let’s see how to ask if it’s possible to pay by card.
Marzena: For this you must remember Моżna, which is a universal word for asking or giving permission.
Eric: It can be translated in various ways in English, "Can I...?” or "May I...?", "Is it okay to...?" or even "Is it allowed to...?" and "Is it possible to...?"
Marzena: Of course if you wish, you can start the sentence with czy followed by można; the particle czy is optional. The verb expressing the action we’re asking about is always in dictionary form.
Eric: So what’s the Polish for “Can I pay with a credit card?”
Marzena: It can either be Czy można płacić kartą? or Można płacić kartą? In response, you will usually hear short answers like można
Eric: “You can,”
Marzena: or nie można .
Eric: “You can’t.” Ok. To wrap up, let’s give some sample sentences.
Marzena: Sure thing! Poproszę herbatę i makowiec.
Eric: "Tea and poppyseed roll-cake, please."
Marzena: Czy można tutaj robić zdjęcia?
Eric: "Can I take pictures here?"
Marzena: Poproszę kotleta schabowego i Coca-Colę.
Eric: "Pork cutlet and Coca-Cola, please."

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Do widzenia.

9 Comments

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PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Hi Listeners! Try to place your order in a comment!

PolishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:54 AM
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Cześć Harry,


Thank you for studying with us!


The plural Accusative of "kotlet schabowy" would be "kotlety schabowe", so basically, the same form as plural Nominative.

Noun and adjective always have to agree, either in number or grammatical case.


I hope it helps!


Best,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Harry
Sunday at 02:42 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello all,


What would be the plural accusative of "kutlet schabowy"? Do both the noun and the adjective still agree in number and case?

PolishPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:20 PM
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Witaj Maria,


Twoje zamówienie brzmi pysznie i słodko! :)

Chętnie zamówiłabym to samo co Ty!


Pozdrawiam,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Maria
Tuesday at 07:06 AM
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Poprosze szarlotke I kawe)))

PolishPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 08:21 PM
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Hi Marcos


Yes, you are right 'proszę' goes with noun in Accusative. But the Accusative form is (kogo? co?) 'kotleta schabowego', not 'kotlet schabowy'.


Accusative (kogo? co?) is often mistaken/mixed with Nominative (kto? co?), that's why it is always useful to ask both questions when looking for a form of noun:

Poproszę (kogo? co?) kotleta schabowego. not: Poproszę (co?) kotleta schabowego. (if you ask just 'co?' you can mix it with Nominative, as they both ask the sam question: co?)

Widzę (kogo?co?) kotleta schabowego.

To jest (kto? co?) kotlet schabowy.

Upadł mi (kto? co?) kotlet schabowy.


I hope that helps Marcos! If not, please feel free to ask:)


Cheers:sunglasses:

Basia

Team PolishPod101.com

Marcos
Tuesday at 10:54 AM
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Hi guys,


In the lesson transcripts, ordering kotlet schabowy is "poproszę kotleta schabowego", but the shouldn`t the accusative for this be simply "kotlet schabowy"?

PolishPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 05:53 PM
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Hi Andy,


Very good sentence!! No mistakes! :thumbsup:

Keep learning with us.


Regards,

Karolina

Team PolishPod101.com

Andy
Friday at 02:17 AM
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Poproszę jajecznicę i kawę.


Scrambled eggs and coffee please.