Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner Season 1 Lesson 24 - Are You Feeling Okay in Poland? Eric here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about your health in Polish. The conversation takes place at Royal Baths Park.
Marzena: It's between Kasia and Felipe.
Eric: The speakers are friends, so they'll use informal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Kasia: Wszystko w porządku? Źle wyglądasz.
Felipe: Boli mnie głowa.
Kasia: Weź aspirynę.
Felipe: I brzuch.
Kasia: Brzuch też? Masz gorączkę?
Felipe: Chyba nie.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Kasia: Wszystko w porządku? Źle wyglądasz.
Felipe: Boli mnie głowa.
Kasia: Weź aspirynę.
Felipe: I brzuch.
Kasia: Brzuch też? Masz gorączkę?
Felipe: Chyba nie.
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Kasia: Everything ok? You look bad.
Felipe: My head hurts.
Kasia: Take an aspirin.
Felipe: And my stomach.
Kasia: Your stomach too? Do you have a fever?
Felipe: I don't think so.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Marzena, do Poles often go to doctors?
Marzena: Actually Poles tend to avoid going to a doctor as long as we can, and especially with common, not very serious illnesses, we try to cure ourselves in our own ways.
Eric: I see. Then how do you buy medicine? Can you do it without a prescription?
Marzena: There are a large number of medicines that can be purchased without a prescription for coughs, sore throats, runny noses, and so on.
Eric: And if medicine doesn't help?
Marzena: If you don't know what medicine you need, you can tell the pharmacist what's wrong with you and the pharmacist will make some suggestions. There are also traditional ways to cure colds.
Eric: Like what?
Marzena: For example, drinking hot milk with honey and butter melted in it, which treats a sore throat. For general colds, people will drink honey and lemon, as well as eat hot chicken soup, which is the best way to warm up when you're sick.
Eric: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Marzena: porządek [natural native speed]
Eric: order, clean up
Marzena: porządek [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: porządek [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: źle [natural native speed]
Eric: bad, wrong
Marzena: źle [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: źle [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: wyglądać [natural native speed]
Eric: to look
Marzena: wyglądać [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wyglądać [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: boleć [natural native speed]
Eric: to ache, to hurt
Marzena: boleć [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: boleć [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: głowa [natural native speed]
Eric: head
Marzena: głowa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: głowa [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: brać [natural native speed]
Eric: take
Marzena: brać [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: brać [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: aspiryna [natural native speed]
Eric: aspirin
Marzena: aspiryna [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: aspiryna [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: brzuch [natural native speed]
Eric: stomach
Marzena: brzuch [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: brzuch [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Marzena: gorączka [natural native speed]
Eric: fever
Marzena: gorączka [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: gorączka [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Marzena: chyba [natural native speed]
Eric: probably, I guess
Marzena: chyba [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: chyba [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Marzena: Wszystko w porządku?
Eric: which, depending on intonation, can be a question, “Is everything ok?”, or just simply a statement, “Everything is okay.”
Marzena: Right. In Polish, both the question and the statement are the same, no need to change anything except for the intonation.
Eric: Let's break down this phrase to see the meaning of each word.
Marzena: Sure. Wszystko means “everything” in English, the preposition w normally means “in,” and the word porządku is derived from porządek which means “order” or “clean up.”
Eric: So it literally means “Is everything in order?” Just like in English, we ask this question when we notice something worrying about another person's expression or behavior. Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say.. Nie wyglądasz dobrze. Wszystko w porządku?
Eric: ..which means “You don't look well. Is everything ok?” Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: Źle wyglądasz.
Eric: which means “You look bad.”
Marzena: The first word is the adverb źle which means “badly.” wyglądasz is the second person singular form of the verb wyglądać, meaning “to look like.” Altogether, Źle wyglądasz
Eric: This phrase is used whenever you think someone looks tired or sick, when we think that something might be wrong with them. It usually expresses interest and worry, and it's like asking someone to tell us what happened or how they feel. Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say.. Żle wyglądasz. Dobrze się czujesz?
Eric: .. which means “You look bad. Are you feeling ok?” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson you'll learn how to talk about your health. There are many ways to talk about your health, and it’s definitely a very important skill to master. In the dialogue, Felipe wasn’t feeling very well and he said…
Marzena: Boli mnie głowa.
Eric: Let's break down this sentence to see the meaning of each word.
Marzena: Sure. The first word, boli, means “aches.” Next, we have mnie meaning “me” and the noun głowa meaning “head.” Boli mnie głowa.
Eric: Which literally means “My head aches,” but you can translate it as “I have a headache.” As you can see, this sentence construction is very simple.
Marzena: Right. Just start with boli mnie, where boli is the verb and means “aches.” Then, mnie, which means “me” in the accusative, and finish by naming the place that aches in the nominative case.
Eric: For example you can say...
Marzena: Boli mnie brzuch.
Eric: “I have a stomachache.”
Marzena: Boli mnie ząb.
Eric: “I have a toothache.”
Marzena: Boli mnie kolano.
Eric: “My knee aches.” Marzena, can we use the same pattern for plural nouns, like "legs" for example?
Marzena: In this case, just replace boli with bolą.
Eric: Can you give use some examples?
Marzena: Bolą mnie nogi.
Eric: “My legs ache.”
Marzena: Bolą mnie płuca.
Eric: “My lungs ache.” Great! Another simple way of talking about your condition is using the verb …
Marzena: mieć
Eric: which means “to have.” We heard it used in the dialogue in the form of a question.
Marzena: Masz gorączkę?
Eric: which means “Do you have a fever?” If we want to say “I have a fever” in Polish it will be…
Marzena: mam gorączkę. We can also say Mam ból głowy, which literally means “I have a headache.”
Eric: Let's break down this sentence to see the meaning of each word.
Marzena: The first word, mam, is the first person singular of the verb mieć, and means “I have.” Next we have the masculine noun ból, which means “pain.” This is followed by głowy, which stands for “head” in the genitive case, but the whole phrase ból głowy acts like the accusative case, since it's the direct object of mam, which means “I have.”
Eric: So, altogether we have…
Marzena: Mam ból głowy.
Eric: Literally it means “I have a pain of the head,” but you can translate it as another way to say “I have a headache.” Marzena, can you give us some examples using this grammar pattern?
Marzena: Sure. For example you can say.. Mam grypę.
Eric: “I have the flu.”
Marzena: Mam dreszcze.
Eric: “I have shivers.” Listeners, please check the lesson notes to get a list of body parts.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Do usłyszenia.

4 Comments

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PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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What remedies do you use when you get a cold?

PolishPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:20 AM
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Hi Marcos


Thank you for the questions, I appreciate your hunger for knowledge!:)


1. Żołądek - the organ of the body (stomach); brzuch - the middle part of the body (belly, but also stomach in English).


2. Wziąć - we use for the past tense (Bartek wziął prysznic) or future (Bartek weźmie prysznic). 'Brać' has exactly the same meaning ad 'wziąć' but comes only in present time (Bartek bierze prysznic). That is the easiest way to remember and distinct both forms:)


3. The issue is fixed now :) Thank you Marcos!


Best:sunglasses:

Basia

Team PolishPod101.com

Marcos
Sunday at 01:45 AM
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I'm in a mood for asking lots of questions today :laughing:


1) What is the difference between żołądek and brzuch? One is the organ and the other is the region of the body?


2) Brać seems to be one of those verbs that will drive me crazy for a while :) Looking a a table of conjugation of Polish verbs, the imperative form used in the lesson is that of the perfective form, wziąć , but the form mentioned in the lesson notes is brać, the imperfective one. Why? And when would one form or the other be used (in a very general way)?


3) Finally, one comment: looks like there is a mistake in the lesson notes. Somewhere in them brzuch is translated as head.


Cheers :sunglasses:

Marcos
Sunday at 01:32 AM
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Kiedy mam przeziębienie, często biorę propolis (okropnie smakuje...) i piję wiele sok pomarańczowy (przepysznie smakuje!).