Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 9 - What Are Your Plans in Poland? John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn about imperatives. The conversation takes place at a radio station.
Marzena: It's between Thomas and Ann.
John: The speakers are strangers; therefore, they’ll speak both formal and informal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Ania: Witam państwa w naszym nowym programie "Bliżej ludzi". Dzisiaj jest z nami Tomasz, który od trzech lat mieszka w Polsce. Dzień dobry Tomaszu.
Thomas: Dzień dobry Aniu. Dziękuję za zaproszenie.
Ania: Powiedz nam coś więcej o sobie.
Thomas: Jestem z Ameryki, ale obecnie szukam pracy w Polsce. Interesuję się polskim filmem i przepadam za pierogami.
Ania: O, koniecznie spróbuj pierogów z jagodami.
Thomas: Nie omieszkam.
Ania: Zdradź nam proszę jakie są twoje plany na przyszłość?
Thomas: Jestem jeszcze kawalerem, ale jeżeli znajdę tutaj żonę to chyba nie wyjadę.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Ann: Welcome to our new show, "Closer to People." Today we have with us Thomas, who has been living in Poland for the past 3 years. Good morning, Thomas.
Thomas: Good morning, Ann. Thank you for your invitation.
Ann: Could you tell us more about yourself?
Thomas: I'm from America, but currently I'm looking for a job in Poland. I'm interested in Polish movies, and I adore Polish pierogi.
Ann: Oh, be sure to try pierogi with blueberries.
Thomas: I will not fail to do so.
Ann: Could you tell us what your plans are for the future?
Thomas: I'm still single, but if I find a wife here then I don't think I will leave.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: I hope Thomas finds his Polish wife!
Marzena: I hope he can find a job!
John: Yes, that’s important too!
Marzena: Radio is still pretty popular in Poland.
John: Really? Who usually listens to the radio?
Marzena: A lot of age ranges do, but it’s especially popular with old people.
John: Is internet radio popular?
Marzena: Yes, it is. Internet radio has been available in Poland since 1998.
John: What about podcasts?
Marzena: It was about 2005 when the first Polish podcasts began.
John: Do you know how many Poles listen to the radio?
Marzena: About 75% of Poles listen to the radio every day.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: program [natural native speed]
John: show, program
Marzena: program[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: program [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: blisko [natural native speed]
John: near
Marzena: blisko[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: blisko [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: zaproszenie [natural native speed]
John: invitation
Marzena: zaproszenie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: zaproszenie [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: obecnie [natural native speed]
John: currently
Marzena: obecnie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: obecnie [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: interesować się [natural native speed]
John: to be interested in
Marzena: interesować się[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: interesować się [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: nie omieszkać [natural native speed]
John: to not fail to
Marzena: nie omieszkać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: nie omieszkać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: zdradzić [natural native speed]
John: to tell (a secret)
Marzena: zdradzić[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: zdradzić [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: plan [natural native speed]
John: plan
Marzena: plan[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: plan [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: kawaler [natural native speed]
John: single, bachelor
Marzena: kawaler[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: kawaler [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: żona [natural native speed]
John: wife
Marzena: żona[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: żona [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Marzena: dziękuję za
John: meaning "thank you for." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Marzena: dziękuję literally means “I’m saying thank you.”
John: And what does the next word mean?
Marzena: That’s za. It’s a preposition meaning “for.” It’s then followed by a noun in the accusative case.
John: How do you use this phrase?
Marzena: You can use it to show that someone is grateful for something.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Dziękuję za twoją pomoc.
John: ...which means "Thank you for your help."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: nie omieszkam
John: meaning "I will not fail to do." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Marzena: This is a negative form of the verb omieszkać.
John: Which means “to fail to do something.”
Marzena: This verb is almost always used in the negative form.
John: It’s used to show that you won’t forget, or you won’t fail to do something.
Marzena: Yes, the verb omieszkać is a little old-fashioned and isn’t really used in other phrases.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Dziękuję za polecenie, nie omieszkam sprawdzić.
John: ...which means "Thank you for your recommendation. I will not fail to check it out."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: plany na
John: meaning "plans for..." What does the first word mean?
Marzena: plany means “plans” and is in the plural form. It’s followed by the preposition na.
John: This means “for.”
Marzena: It’s usually followed by a noun in the accusative case.
John: Can it be used with anything else?
Marzena: It can be used with the verb mieć to show that you have something planned.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Nie mam jeszcze planów na przyszłość.
John: ...which means "I don't have any plans for the future yet."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about imperatives.
John: We use the imperative form to tell somebody to do something.
Marzena: Polish isn’t as direct as English, but you’ll still hear formal and informal imperatives.
John: Let’s look at the informal imperative.
Marzena: Imperatives are formed by taking the third person singular form. Then you drop the final -e, -ie, -y, -i, or add -j to the final -a.
John: Let’s hear an example using the verb “to sing.”
Marzena: Śpiewać becomes śpiewa in the third person singular form. Then you add -j, to make śpiewaj. This is the imperative form.
John: Are there any exceptions to these conjugations?
Marzena: Yes, sometimes o turns into ó. For example, Robić becomes robi and then, rób.
John: These all mean “to do.”
Marzena: If, after getting rid of the final vowel, the last consonant is n or rz preceded by another consonant, then you add -y or -ij. For verbs where the second singular ends in -ajesz, the imperative is formed by adding -awaj.
John: There are a few other singular exceptions, which are listed in the lesson notes.
Marzena: To make them negative, you simply put the particle nie in front of the verb.
John: How do we say “eat something”?
Marzena: Zjedz coś!
John: And “don’t sing so loudly!”
Marzena: Nie śpiewaj tak głośno!
John: Next, let’s move onto the vocative case.
Marzena: You use this when addressing someone, especially when calling someone or writing an email.
John: A lot of Poles, however, don’t use the vocative in that situation and use the nominative instead.
Marzena: Right, but technically that’s wrong. It’s weird in some cases to not use the vocative, so try to always use it when appropriate.
John: You can check the table in the lesson notes to see how to make the vocative case. For now, let’s look at some examples.
Marzena: Droga Aniu! Jak leci?
John: “Dear Anna! How’s it going?”
Marzena: Jak się macie, dziewczyny?
John: “Girls, how are you?”
Marzena: Finally, we can use który and its other forms in the same way “which” is used in English.
John: It can be used as an interrogative pronoun or as an introduction to another sentence. In this case, it can also be translated to “who” or “whom.”
Marzena: For example, Którego komputera używasz?
John: “Which computer are you using?”
Marzena: To jest człowiek, który zmienił kino.
John: “This is the man who changed the cinema.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

3 Comments

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PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Do you listen to Polish radio stations?

 

PolishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 02:26 AM
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Cześć Anirudh!


Thanks for your question :)

“There are many traditional vegetarian dishes in Poland” po polsku to:

"W Polsce jest dużo tradycyjnych dań wegetariańskich".


Które polskie danie lubisz najbardziej, Anirudh?


Pozdrawiam,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Anirudh
Tuesday at 02:13 PM
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Cześć !


Nazywam się Anirudh.

Jak powiedzieć po polsku "There are many traditional vegetarian dishes in Poland" ?


Dziękuję Bardzo !