Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 8 - Bargaining in Poland. John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
Marzena: In this lesson, you’ll learn the possessive pronoun swój.
John: The conversation takes place at a marketplace.
Marzena: It's between Ann and a shop clerk.
John: The speakers are strangers in a customer service context; therefore, they’ll speak formal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Ania: Przepraszam, ile za tę bluzkę?
sprzedawca: 70 złotych.
Ania: Pan żartuje? A co jeżeli wezmę dwie?
sprzedawca: 140 złotych.
Ania: Konkurencja ma taniej.
sprzedawca: No dobrze, 130 za dwie.
Ania: Toż to rozbój w biały dzień. Dam panu 100 złotych i i tak pan wyjdzie na swoje.
sprzedawca: Dobrze, ale ja swoje wiem. Nikt nie ma taniej.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Ann: Excuse me, how much for this blouse?
Shop clerk: 70 zloty.
Ann: Are you joking? And what if I take two?
Shop clerk: 140 zloty.
Ann: Competition has it for cheaper.
Shop clerk: Ok then, 130 for two.
Ann: That's a crime in broad daylight! I will give you 100 zloty. You will earn your money anyway.
Shop clerk: Okay, but I know what I know. Nobody has it cheaper.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Ann did not want to pay full price for that blouse!
Marzena: No, she didn’t! I wonder what it looked like.
John: She worked hard getting the price down. Is that normal in Poland?
Marzena: It’s not common to bargain in shopping malls, but it is in marketplaces.
John: Right, remember to bargain in marketplaces!
Marzena: If you ask in the right way, the vendors might give you a discount.
John: What’s the right way to ask?
Marzena: Ann did all of the right things! You can ask for a discount for buying more than one.
John: She also said that she saw it cheaper somewhere else.
Marzena: That’s a good tactic. You can also say that there’s something wrong with it.
John: So, try not to make it sound like you desperately want it?
Marzena: Right. Play hard to get and say Czy mogę dostać upust?
John: That’s “Can I get a discount?” Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: bluzka [natural native speed]
John: blouse
Marzena: bluzka[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: bluzka [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: żartować [natural native speed]
John: to joke
Marzena: żartować[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: żartować [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: wziąć [natural native speed]
John: to take
Marzena: wziąć[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wziąć [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: jeżeli [natural native speed]
John: if
Marzena: jeżeli[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: jeżeli [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: konkurencja [natural native speed]
John: competition
Marzena: konkurencja[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: konkurencja [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: tanio [natural native speed]
John: cheaply
Marzena: tanio[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: tanio [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: dobrze [natural native speed]
John: OK
Marzena: dobrze[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: dobrze [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: rozbój [natural native speed]
John: robbery
Marzena: rozbój[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: rozbój [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: biały dzień [natural native speed]
John: broad daylight
Marzena: biały dzień[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: biały dzień [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: nikt [natural native speed]
John: no one
Marzena: nikt[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: nikt [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Marzena: Konkurencja ma taniej.
John: Meaning "Competition has it cheaper." Can you break this phrase down for us?
Marzena: konkurencja is a noun that means “competition.” Ma is a verb that means “he has” or “she has.”
John: What does the last word mean?
Marzena: taniej is an adjective in the comparative form. It means “cheaper.”
John: This is a phrase that will come in handy at a marketplace.
Marzena: That’s right. You can use it there.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, No wie pan, konkurencja ma taniej.
John: ...which means "You know, sir, competition has it for cheaper."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: Pan żartuje?
John: Meaning "Are you joking?" What can you tell us about this phrase?
Marzena: The first word pan means “sir,” while the second word is the verb żartować.
John: This means “to joke.”
Marzena: You can use this phrase to show amazement and dissatisfaction.
John: Can you use it in informal situations?
Marzena: It’s a strong expression, so you shouldn’t use it formally unless your feelings are very strong.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Mam sobie sama bagaże zanieść? Pan chyba żartuje?
John: ...which means "I have to carry my bags by myself? You must be joking!"
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: To rozbój w bialy dzień.
John: Meaning "This is a crime in broad daylight." This expression has several words, so let’s look at what each one means.
Marzena: The first word to means "this," and it’s followed by rozbój.
John: This means “crime” or “robbery.”
Marzena: Next is the preposition w, meaning “in.” The final two words are the phrase biały dzień.
John: This means “white day.”
Marzena: You can use this expression to show that you’re indignant and irritated about a situation.
John: Can you give us an example using this expression?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Taka cena to rozbój w biały dzień.
John: ...which means "This price is a crime in broad daylight."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about the possessive pronoun "swój."
John: First, let’s review the regular possessive pronouns. The first person possessive pronouns would be “my” and “mine” in English.
Marzena: The masculine is mój, feminine is moja, and neuter is moje.
John: What’s the plural “our” and “ours?”
Marzena: The masculine is nasz, feminine is nasza, and neuter is nasze.
John: There are tables with all of the other possessive pronouns in the lesson notes.
Marzena: Remember to think about the gender and form of the noun that follows the possessive pronoun.
John: Okay. Let’s look at some examples using the masculine for “mine.”
Marzena: Remember, this is mój in nominative.
John: What is it in accusative?
Marzena: It’s mojego or mój.
John: And what about locative?
Marzena: That’s moim.
John: Again there’s a table with all of the variations in the lesson notes. Can we hear a couple of sentence examples?
Marzena: To jest moja torebka.
John: “This is my bag.”
Marzena: Nie lubię moich braci.
John: “I don’t like my brothers.” Now, let’s move on.
Marzena: Yes, we’ll look at swój. Swój also undergoes declination. It’s used instead of mój, twój, etc., if the object or person in question belongs to the subject of the sentence.
John: Are there times when it isn’t used?
Marzena: It isn’t used in the nominative case.
John: So how does it change a sentence?
Marzena: Let’s look at an example. Maria kocha jej chłopaka.
John: “Maria loves her boyfriend.” You could use this sentence to either talk about Maria, or a “her” that isn’t Maria. So, it could also mean, “Maria loves the boyfriend of her friend.”
Marzena: Maria kocha swojego chłopaka
John: “Maria loves her own boyfriend.” This time, we’re definitely talking about Maria and her actual boyfriend, not anyone else’s.
Marzena: Right. You can also use it in a sentence like Pilnuj swojego nosa.
John: “Mind your own business.”
Marzena: Opowiedz mi o swojej pracy.
John: “Tell me about your job.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

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