Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 6 - What Is the Polish Weather Forecast Saying? John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the future tense. Because it is a weather forecast, the conversation takes place on TV.
Marzena: The speaker is a broadcaster.
John: The speaker is a TV personality; therefore, she will speak formal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
prezenterka: Dobry wieczór, witam państwa i zapraszam na prognozę pogody.
prezenterka: W nadchodzących dniach zdecydowanie się ochłodzi.
prezenterka: Na południu Polski temperatura spadnie z 20 do 12 stopni.
prezenterka: Możliwe będą przelotne burze.
prezenterka: Na północy miejscami będzie padało.
prezenterka: Od soboty pogoda się poprawi. Temperatura wzrośnie do 18 stopni nad morzem i nawet 20 na Dolnym Śląsku.
prezenterka: Dziękują za uwagę. Do zobaczenia jutro, o tej samej porze.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Broadcaster: Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. Here comes our weather forecast.
Broadcaster: In the upcoming days, it will definitely cool down.
Broadcaster: In southern Poland, the temperature will drop from 20 to 12 degrees.
Broadcaster: There is a possibility of occasional storms.
Broadcaster: In the north part, it is going to rain in some places.
Broadcaster: From Saturday, the weather will improve. The temperature will rise to 18 degrees by the seaside and even to 20 in the Lower Silesia.
Broadcaster: Thank you for your attention. See you tomorrow at the same time.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: The weather forecast doesn’t sound that bad, apart from the rain in the north.
Marzena: Yeah, it’s pretty mild weather. Maybe a little cool, but not too bad.
John: I think that a lot of people have this image of Poland as being a really cold country.
Marzena: Yeah, I think that’s a common stereotype.
John: Is it true?
Marzena: Winter can be very cold. It can reach temperatures of minus 40 degrees.
John: Wow, that’s cold! How long does winter last?
Marzena: From around late November until March.
John: What about Polish summers? What can we expect from those?
Marzena: The summers can be very nice. It can get to 30 or 35 degrees, easily.
John: That’s nice beach weather! I prefer summer to winter.
Marzena: Me too! In Polish, you can say that you prefer summer to winter by saying Wolę lato od zimy.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: zapraszać [natural native speed]
John: to invite
Marzena: zapraszać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: zapraszać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: prognoza pogody [natural native speed]
John: weather forecast
Marzena: prognoza pogody [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: prognoza pogody [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: nadchodzcy [natural native speed]
John: coming
Marzena: nadchodzący[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: nadchodzący [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: zdecydowanie [natural native speed]
John: definitely
Marzena: zdecydowanie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: zdecydowanie [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: ochłodzić się [natural native speed]
John: to cool off
Marzena: ochłodzić się[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: ochłodzić się [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: możliwy [natural native speed]
John: possible
Marzena: możliwy[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: możliwy [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: padać [natural native speed]
John: to drop
Marzena: padać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: padać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: poprawić się [natural native speed]
John: to improve
Marzena: poprawić się[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: poprawić się [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: wzrosnąć [natural native speed]
John: to increase
Marzena: wzrosnąć[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wzrosnąć [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: uwaga [natural native speed]
John: attention
Marzena: uwaga[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: uwaga [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Marzena: zapraszam na
John: meaning "I invite for." Can you explain this phrase for us?
Marzena: Zapraszam is a first person singular form of the verb zepraszać.
John: This means “to invite.”
Marzena: Then there’s the preposition na, meaning "on."
John: You can use this to invite someone to something.
Marzena: Yes, it’s usually used for more formal invitations, but it can be used informally too.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Zapraszam wszystkich na uroczystą ucztę.
John: ...which means "I invite you all to a formal dinner."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: nadchodzące dni
John: meaning "coming days." What do the two words in this phrase mean?
Marzena: The first word nadchodzące consists of a prefix nad, meaning "up," and chodzące, meaning "going."
John: Altogether, the word means “upcoming.”
Marzena: The second word is a plural noun dni, meaning "days,"
John: When would you usually hear this phrase?
Marzena: In formal contexts, such as in a weather forecast.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Nadchodzące dni pokażą czy to była dobra decyzja.
John: ...which means "Upcoming days will show if this was a good decision."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: dziękuję za uwagę
John: meaning "thank you for your attention." There are quite a few words in this phrase, so can you break it down for us?
Marzena: The first word, dziękuję, means "I'm being grateful." The preposition za follows it.
John: That means “for.”
Marzena: Last is the noun uwaga in the accusative case.
John: This means “attention.” Altogether, it means “thank you for your attention.”
Marzena: It’s rather formal. You may hear it at the end of a speech or TV broadcast.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Jeszcze raz dziękuję za państwa uwagę.
John: ...which means "Once again thank you for your attention."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about the future tense.
John: Marzena, tenses in Polish are kind of easy compared to some other languages, aren’t they?
Marzena: Well, there are only three main tenses - past, present, and future - so that yes, that makes it easier.
John: In this lesson, we’re going to look at the future tense. How do we make the future tense in Polish?
Marzena: Actually, there are two ways. First, we’ll look at the compound future tense.
John: This sometimes goes by other names, but we’ll stick with the compound future tense.
Marzena: For this, you use the future tense of the verb być.
John: This means “to be.” What are the future tenses?
Marzena: The masculine forms are będę, będziesz and będzie.
John: The others are listed in the lesson notes. So, we have the future tense of “to be.” Do we need anything else?
Marzena: Yes, you need to follow it with the past tense of an imperfective verb.
John: How do we make that past tense?
Marzena: You take the final ć from the infinitive and then add a prefix. This changes depending on whether the verb is masculine, feminine, neuter, or plural.
John: The different prefixes themselves are, again, listed in the lesson notes. For now, let’s hear some examples.
Marzena: Będę szła na zakupy, potrzebujesz czegoś?
John: “I will be going shopping; do you need something?”
Marzena: Będziesz szedł może do sklepu?
John: “Are you going to the shop by any chance?” So that’s how you make the future tense for imperfect verbs. What about perfect verbs?
Marzena: We use the present tense. By taking a perfective verb and making present tense form, we actually express a future meaning.
John: Can you work through an example of this?
Marzena: Sure. Let’s take a look at płacić - this means “to pay” in imperfective form. The present tense is płacę.
John: Meaning “I pay.”
Marzena: But, take the perfective zapłacić. Then, make it into the present tense, zapłacę.
John: Then it becomes the future tense, “I will pay.”
Marzena: That’s right. An example sentence is Jutro pójdę na zakupy.
John: “I will go shopping tomorrow.” Let’s finish by looking at a few vocabulary words that can be used to describe weather changes.
Marzena: We can say ochłodzić się
John: “To get colder.”
Marzena: ocieplić się
John: “To get hotter.”
Marzena: wypogodzić się or rozpogodzić się
John: These both mean “to clear up.” Finally, let’s hear an example sentence.
Marzena: Od jutra powinno się wypogodzić.
John: “From tomorrow, the weather should get better.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

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