Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 3 - What Are Your Plans for Tomorrow in Poland? John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn some time expressions. The conversation takes place at a coffee shop.
Marzena: It's between Mark and Ann.
John: The speakers are friends, so they’ll use informal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Marek: Hej Aniu, co słychać?
Ania: Jakoś leci, tylko muszę napisać sprawozdanie na jutro i wysłać je przed ósmą.
Marek: Oj, współczuje. Ja jutro o ósmej mam egzamin na prawo jazdy. Muszę wstać wcześnie rano.
Ania: Biedactwo.
Marek: Ale za to po dziesiątej już będę wolny. Co powiesz na kawę?
Ania: Niestety, na dziesiątą już mam plany.
Marek: No trudno.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Mark: Hey Ann, how are you?
Ann: Not too bad, but I have to write a report for tomorrow and send it before eight.
Mark: Oh, that's too bad. I have a driving test at eight o'clock tomorrow. I need to wake up early in the morning.
Ann: You poor thing.
Mark: But after ten I will be free. How about a coffee?
Ann: Unfortunately I already have plans for ten.
Mark: Oh well.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: So Mark has a driving test? Good luck! I remember being really nervous for my driving test.
Marzena: Me too!
John: Is it easy to get a driving license in Poland?
Marzena: I think that it’s a long and painful process.
John: What do you have to do to get your license?
Marzena: Intensive courses are not popular in Poland, so people usually have three or four months of practice before they attempt the test.
John: Is it a difficult test?
Marzena: Like some other European countries, it’s not unusual to fail three or four times before passing.
John: Wow, it must be difficult then!
Marzena: I think so.
John: Do you have to take the test in Polish?
Marzena: Actually, you can take the test in German or English, too.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: słychać [natural native speed]
John: to be heard
Marzena: słychać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: słychać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: lecieć [natural native speed]
John: to fly
Marzena: lecieć[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: lecieć [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: współczuć [natural native speed]
John: to sympathize
Marzena: współczuć[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: współczuć [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: egzamin [natural native speed]
John: exam
Marzena: egzamin[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: egzamin [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: prawo jazdy [natural native speed]
John: driving license
Marzena: prawo jazdy[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: prawo jazdy [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: biedactwo [natural native speed]
John: poor thing
Marzena: biedactwo[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: biedactwo [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: powiedzieć [natural native speed]
John: to tell
Marzena: powiedzieć[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: powiedzieć [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: niestety [natural native speed]
John: unfortunately
Marzena: niestety[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: niestety [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: Co słychać?
John: meaning "What's up?" There are two words in this phrase. What do they both mean?
Marzena: Co means "what," and słychać means "to be heard."
John: So it’s literally “what can be heard.”
Marzena: This is an informal expression, so you can use it with your friends.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Co tam słychać? Gdzie jedziecie?
John: ...which means "What's up? Where are you going?"
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Marzena: współczuć
John: Meaning "to sympathize." This is a verb.
Marzena: The first part of the word, współ-, is similar to the English prefix “co-”.
John: What does the second part mean?
Marzena: czuć means “to feel.”
John: It’s easy to see why together they mean “to sympathize.”
Marzena: I think so too!
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Bardzo ci współczuje z powodu tego co się stało.
John: ...which means "I really sympathize with you because of what happened."
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Marzena: biedactwo
John: meaning "poor thing." This is a noun.
Marzena: It comes from the word bieda, which means "poverty."
John: When can you use this word?
Marzena: It can be used to sympathize.
John: In English, you can use a word like this in a sarcastic way too. Is it the same in Polish?
Marzena: Yes, it is. You can be sarcastic with this, too. It’s rather informal though, so don’t use it in formal situations.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Co ci się stąło, biedactwo?
John: ...which means "What happened to you, you poor little thing?"
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn some time expressions.
John: How can we talk about a precise time in Polish?
Marzena: There are some prepositions we can use for this.
John: In this lesson, we’ll look at four such prepositions. What’s the first one?
Marzena: o. We can use o with the locative case to express a specific time.
John: This preposition means “at.” Okay, how can we use this to say “we are going to meet at 5 o’clock?”
Marzena: Spotykamy się o piątej. The second preposition is na. This is used with the accusative case.
John: This preposition means “for” or “in.” It can be used for deadlines or to talk about when something happens. Marzena, how can we use this to say “I will prepare dinner for nine.”
Marzena: Zrobię obiad na dziewiątą. You can also use this to talk about duration. For example, Jadę na miesiąc do Japonii.
John: “I’m going to Japan for one month.”
Marzena: The next preposition is przed. This is used with the instrumental case.
John: We can use this preposition to talk about something happening “before” a certain time. For example, “I can’t sleep before 10.”
Marzena: Which is Nie mogę zasnąć przed dziesiątą in Polish. The last preposition is po.
John: This is used with the locative case to say that something will happen “after.” For example, “He came shortly past 11.”
Marzena: Przyjechał na krótko po jedenastej. Now, let’s quickly review muszę.
John: This is the modal verb “have to.” When used in a sentence, it’s followed by an infinitive.
Marzena: Yes. For example Musiałaś ją zapraszać? Now, musieć can be used as “have to,” but can also be “must.”
John: What are some other modal verbs in Polish?
Marzena: There are modal verbs such as powinienem, “should” in its masculine form. Powinieneś iść na dietę.
John: “You should go on a diet.”
Marzena: Or mieć, which is “supposed to.” Miałem to zrobić.
John: “I was supposed to do it.” Marzena, how do we make propositions in Polish? You know, sentences such as “How about a drive?”
Marzena: You use Co powiesz na, followed by the accusative case. To ask “how about a drive,” you’d say Co powiesz na przejażdżkę?
John: Does that sentence pattern change depending on who you’re talking to?
Marzena: Yes. The example I gave is the second singular form. For a group of people, you’d use Co powiecie na?
John: How would you ask a group of people, “how about a coffee?”
Marzena: Co powiecie na kawę? Also, neither of these patterns should be used in formal conversation.
John: There’s more information on the formal versions in the lesson notes.

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

5 Comments

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PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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What's the age limit for getting a driver's licence in your country? Tell us in Polish!

PolishPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:00 PM
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Hi Shawn,


Yes, you have to change the ending of the word, when you are talking about the time.


Other hours are changed in the same way:

Muszę to skończyć na trzecią.

Muszę to skończyć na dwunastą.

Muszę to skończyć na trzynastą.

etc.


Hope it helps!


Sincerely,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Shawn
Thursday at 12:26 AM
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Hi, I'm wondering why in the below example that piętnastą has this declension? Is this because time (as in hours of the day) is always feminine? In other words - muszę to skończyć na piętnastą godzinę?


Example: Muszę to skończyć na piętnastą.



PolishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:32 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi drtom drtom,


Wielkie dzięki za Twoją opinię.

Zapytaj swojego syna, kiedy można zdawać prawo jazdy w Polsce.

Życzymy powodzenia na egzaminie córkom Twojego syna! 👍


Kind regards,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

drtom drtom
Tuesday at 06:10 AM
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Hej, naprawde nie wiem. Mozliwie siedemnascie. Musze odpowiedic mojego syn o tym. Jego corki wlasnie dostaja ich


prawo jazdy.