Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 25 - What Do You Want To Be When You Grow Up in Poland? John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll review Polish tenses. The conversation takes place at home.
Marzena: It's between Mark and Alice.
John: The speakers are family members; therefore, they’ll speak informal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Ala: Tatusiu, kim ty chciałeś być, jak byłeś mały?
Marek: Ja? Ja chciałem być strażakiem.
Ala: Strażakiem? A mamusia?
Marek: Mamusia chciała być architektem.
Ala: O! A ja chcę być lekarzem. Nie, Ja zostanę lekarzem!
Marek: W takim razie musisz się więcej uczyć. Ja się nie uczyłem, więc nie zostałem strażakiem.
Ala: A ja myślałam, że się uczyłeś i dlatego zostałeś prawnikiem.
Marek: A coś ty się taka mądra zrobiła. Pamiętaj, że na razie jesteś jeszcze uczennicą.
Ala: Tak, tak, byłam uczennicą, jestem uczennicą, będę uczennicą. Znam to na pamięć.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Alice: Daddy, who did you want to be when you were little?
Mark: Me? I wanted to be a firefighter.
Alice: Firefighter? And Mommy?
Mark: Mommy wanted to be an architect.
Alice: Oh! And I want to be a doctor. No, I will be a doctor!
Mark: In that case, you need to study more. I did not study, so I did not become a firefighter.
Alice: Oh, and I thought you became a lawyer because you studied.
Mark: When did you become so smart, huh? Remember that you are still a student.
Alice: Yeah, yeah, I was a student, I am a student, I will be a student. I know it by heart.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Marzena, what did you want to be when you were a kid?
Marzena: I wanted to be a Polish podcast host, of course!
John: Of course, what else! I wanted to be an astronaut.
Marzena: Well, at least one of us achieved our dreams.
John: The dialogue in this lesson was a cute conversation between family members.
Marzena: Family is very important to Polish people.
John: What are family relations like?
Marzena: Children are taught to respect their elders from an early age.
John: How old are children when they leave the household?
Marzena: Usually quite young. They often leave by the age of 18 or 19.
John: Do they stay in touch with the family after leaving?
Marzena: Yes, they stay in touch and come back for Christmas or Easter.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: strażak [natural native speed]
John: firefighter
Marzena: strażak [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: strażak [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: architekt [natural native speed]
John: architect
Marzena: architekt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: architekt [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: lekarz [natural native speed]
John: doctor
Marzena: lekarz [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: lekarz [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: prawnik [natural native speed]
John: lawyer
Marzena: prawnik [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: prawnik [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: taki [natural native speed]
John: such
Marzena: taki [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: taki [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: dlatego [natural native speed]
John: because, so
Marzena: dlatego [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: dlatego [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: mądry [natural native speed]
John: clever
Marzena: mądry [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: mądry [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: uczennica [natural native speed]
John: schoolgirl
Marzena: uczennica [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: uczennica [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: znać [natural native speed]
John: to know
Marzena: znać [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: znać [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: pamięć [natural native speed]
John: memory
Marzena: pamięć [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pamięć [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: lekarz
John: meaning "doctor." What can you tell us about this noun?
Marzena: Like many other professions in Poland, it’s used mostly in the masculine form.
John: What do we do if want to use it with women?
Marzena: We usually add pani, meaning "miss," even though a feminine version of the noun, lekarka, does exist.
John: Does this noun refer to the profession or to a person who is a doctor?
Marzena: It means the profession. To refer to a person, you can say doktor.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Muszę iść do lekarza.
John: ...which means "I have to go to the doctor."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: znać coś na pamięć
John: meaning "to know something by heart." Can you break down this expression for us?
Marzena: The verb znać, meaning "to know," is followed by the object and phrase na pamięć.
John: This means “on the memory.” So the whole phrase becomes “to know something by heart.”
Marzena: You can use this phrase to say that you know something very well.
John: Is there anything we should be wary of?
Marzena: A very common mistake one can make here is using wiedzieć, which also translates to "to know," instead of znać.
John: Noted. Can you give us an example using our original phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Znam już to na pamięć.
John: ...which means "I know it by heart already."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll review Polish tenses.
John: As we’ve said before, there are only three tenses in Polish - past tense, present tense, and future tense. Let’s start with past tense.
Marzena: To make the past tense, you remove the final -ć and add a prefix.
John: The prefix you add depends on whether it’s singular, plural, feminine, masculine, or neuter.
Marzena: Right. All of the prefixes are listed in the lesson notes.
John: Let’s hear some example sentences.
Marzena: Nic nie kupiłam/kupiłem.
John: “I didn’t buy anything.”
Marzena: Późno poszłam spać.
John: “I went to sleep really late.” Now, let’s move onto the present tense.
Marzena: The ending of present tense verb depends on the last two or more letters. For example, verbs ending with -ać conjugate differently from verbs ending in -ić or -yć or verbs ending with -ować or -awać.
John: Again, all of the conjugations are in the lesson notes. Now let’s hear some sentence examples.
Marzena: Ona jest bardzo zmęczona.
John: “She is very tired.”
Marzena: Słyszysz ten dźwięk?
John: “Do you hear this sound?”
Marzena: Wiesz może, gdzie jest Marta?
John: “Do you know, by any chance, where Marta is?” Now, let’s move onto the future.
Marzena: The distinction between perfective and imperfective is stronger in the future tense than it is in the past or present.
John: How do we make the future tense with imperfective verbs?
Marzena: We use the verb być.
John: How about perfective verbs?
Marzena: We add the verb być to the past tense form of the imperfective verb.
John: Let’s finish up this lesson with some examples.
Marzena: Za rok będę pracować w innej firmie.
John: “In a year, I will be working for a different company.”
Marzena: Nie wiem, kiedy będę gotowy.
John: “I’m not sure when I will be ready.”
Marzena: Za rok pojadę do Afryki.
John: “In a year I will go to Africa.” We just spoke about perfective and imperfective verbs, so can you remind us what the difference is?
Marzena: In general, we use perfective to express completed action.
John: So imperfective verbs are used for ongoing actions.
Marzena: There are some expressions that are characteristic for imperfective and perfective.
John: There’s a table of these expressions in the lesson notes. For now, let’s hear some more examples.
Marzena: Przez rok nie jadłam mięsa.
John: “I wasn’t eating meat for a year.”
Marzena: Raz na rok chodzę do dentysty.
John: “I go to the dentist once a year.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you in another series! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

5 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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What was your dream job when you were little? Tell us in Polish!

PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:27 PM
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Cześć Formika,


Thank you for sharing your dream with us ❤️️

Mam nadzieję, że zostaniesz reżyserem i laureatem Oscara!

O czym będą Twoje filmy?


Sincerely,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com


Formika
Friday at 04:29 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Czesc,


Kiedy dorosnę, chcę być laureatem Oscara rezyser.


Czesc!

PolishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 02:29 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Anirudh,


Dzięki za pytanie!

Your sentence “I want to be a Nobel Laureate / Scientist when I grow up” in Polish is:

"Kiedy dorosnę, chcę być (or: zostać) laureatem Nobla / naukowcem".


Powodzenia Anirudh!

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Anirudh
Tuesday at 02:17 PM
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Cześć !


Nazywam się Anirudh.

Jak powiedzieć po polsku “I want to be a Nobel Laureate / Scientist when I grow up” ?


Dziękuję Bardzo !