Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 22 - Getting a Refund in Poland. John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll review cases. The conversation takes place at a shop.
Marzena: It's between a shop clerk and Monica.
John: The speakers are strangers in a customer service context; therefore, they’ll speak formal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Monika: Dzień dobry, wczoraj kupiłam u państwa tę sukienkę. Niestety okazało się, że jednak nie pasuje.
sprzedawca: Czy ma pani paragon?
Monika: Nie wzięłam paragonu, ale sukienka ma jeszcze metkę. O! Proszę!
sprzedawca: Muszę spytać się kierownika. Dlaczego chce pani ją zwrócić?
Monika: Niestety żadne z moich butów do niej nie pasują. Poza tym źle się w niej czuję.
sprzedawca: No dobrze, metka wygląda na nienaruszoną.
sprzedawca: Proszę podejść ze mną do kasy. Zwrócę pani należną kwotę.
Monika: Dziękuję, następnym razem postaram się kupić buty wraz z sukienką.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Monica: Hello, yesterday I bought this dress here. Sadly, it turned out that it does not fit.
Shop clerk: Do you have the receipt?
Monica: I didn't take the receipt but it’s still got the tag on it. Here, look!
Shop clerk: I will have to ask the manager. Why do you want to return it?
Monica: Unfortunately, none of my shoes match with it. Besides I feel bad in it.
Shop clerk: Well, the tag seems intact.
Shop clerk: Please come to the register with me. I will return the amount due to you.
Monica: Thank you, next time I will try to buy the shoes and dress together.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Monica returned a dress in this lesson’s conversation.
Marzena: Yes, she had several reasons to return it.
John: Thankfully the dress still had the label on, as she didn’t have the receipt anymore.
Marzena: It’s always best to keep the receipt!
John: Do Polish people often take defective goods back?
Marzena: Actually no, Polish people don’t like to throw things away.
John: So what do people do? Keep repairing things?
Marzena: Yes, they do. They’ll keep fixing something until it’s no longer fixable.
John: Is that something your family does too?
Marzena: Yeah, my mom is still using an oven she bought 30 years ago from a secondhand store.
John: Wow, that’s amazing! Do young people also fix things?
Marzena: Yes, they do.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: kupić [natural native speed]
John: to buy
Marzena: kupić [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: kupić [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: niestety [natural native speed]
John: unfortunately
Marzena: niestety [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: niestety [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: okazać się [natural native speed]
John: to turn out
Marzena: okazać się [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: okazać się [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: paragon [natural native speed]
John: receipt
Marzena: paragon [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: paragon [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: metka [natural native speed]
John: tag
Marzena: metka [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: metka [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: pasować [natural native speed]
John: to fit
Marzena: pasować [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pasować [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: czuć się [natural native speed]
John: to feel
Marzena: czuć się [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: czuć się [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: nienaruszony [natural native speed]
John: intact
Marzena: nienaruszony [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: nienaruszony [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: zwrócić [natural native speed]
John: to return
Marzena: zwrócić [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: zwrócić [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: należny [natural native speed]
John: due
Marzena: należny [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: należny [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: pasować
John: meaning "to fit." What can you tell us about this verb?
Marzena: It’s an intransitive and imperfective verb.
John: When do we use this verb?
Marzena: It can be used when something fits something or someone.
John: It can also be used when something is similar to something else.
Marzena: Yes, we can use it to say that two people suit each other.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Pasuje ci piątek?
John: ...which means "Does Friday suit you?"
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Marzena: należny
John: meaning "due, something one should have or get." What can you tell us about this word?
Marzena: It’s an adjective that comes from the verb należeć.
John: This verb means “to belong to.”
Marzena: należeć is comprised of the prefix na- and the verb leżeć, "to lie down."
John: Can you use the adjective in formal and informal situations?
Marzena: Należny is a rather formal word, so it’s used in formal situations.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Osoby te protestują ze względu na brak należnych im praw.
John: ...which means "These people demonstrate because of the lack of their rights."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll review cases.
John: We’re not going to look at the different endings for cases, but instead when you use the cases.
Marzena: Remember, cases are for nouns and adjectives.
John: First is the nominative case.
Marzena: This is Mianownik in Polish.
John: It’s used for the subject of the main verb and for the subject of the verb “to be.”
Marzena: Yes. For example, Kasia już tego żałuje.
John: “Kate regrets it already.” It’s also used with “this is” and “those are.”
Marzena: To jest moja koleżanka.
John: “This is my friend.” Next is the genitive case. We use this case with “of," which includes possessives.
Marzena: Podoba mi się torebka mojej mamy.
John: “I like my mother’s bag.” It can also be used with several prepositions.
Marzena: Like do, dla, od, u, bez, and some others. Bez ciebie by mi się nie udało.
John: “I wouldn’t be able to do it without you.” There are several more instances where we could use this, and they are listed in the lesson notes. The next case is dative.
Marzena: This is Celownik. We can use this in sentences like Zrobiłem ci kawę.”
John: “I made a coffee for you.”
Marzena: Also, Komputer mi się zepsuł.
John: “My computer just broke on me.” Another case is the accusative case.
Marzena: This is Biernik. This is used with transitive verbs. Codziennie piję mleko.
John: “I drink milk every day.” It can also be used with the object of some verbs that are followed by prepositions.
Marzena: Lubię patrzeć na chmury.
John: “I like to look at clouds.” There’s also the instrumental case.
Marzena: This is Narzędnik. It’s used for several things, such as the means of something or the route.
John: It can also be used for actions with a body part.
Marzena: Uśmiechnięta machała ręką.
John: “With a smile, she was waving her hand.” There’s the locative case.
Marzena: This is Miejscownik, and it’s one of the easiest cases. You’ll find it in sentences like Połóż to przy lampie.
John: “Put it near the lamp.”
Marzena: Recently, a lot of Polish people use the nominative case instead of the vocative case.
John: When would it be used?
Marzena: We use the vocative with titles. Dzień dobry, pani Mario!
John: “Good morning, Ms. Mary!”
Marzena: It’s also used with diminutives when calling someone. Basiu!
John: “Barbara!”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

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