Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 2 - Meeting Your Polish Namesake. John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn about some discourse tactics: asking for specification, clarification, and confirmation. The conversation takes place in a coffee shop.
Marzena: It's between Thomas and Tomasz.
John: The speakers are strangers, so they’ll speak informal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Tomasz: Thomas, prawda?
Thomas: Tak, miło mi cię wreszcie poznać.
Tomasz: Mi również, mamy tak samo na imię.
Thomas: Jak to?
Tomasz: Tomasz po angielsku to Thomas.
Thomas: No tak. To skąd jesteś?
Tomasz: Ze Śląska, a konkretnie z Katowic.
Thomas: O, będę niedługo w Katowicach na szkoleniu.
Tomasz: Naprawdę? To świetnie!
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Tomasz: Thomas, right?
Thomas: Yeah, nice to finally meet you.
Tomasz: Same here, we have the same name.
Thomas: How so?
Tomasz: Tomasz in English is Thomas.
Thomas: Oh right. So where are you from?
Tomasz: From Silesia, Katowice to be more specific.
Thomas: Oh, I'm going for a training in Katowice soon.
Tomasz: Really? That's great!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: We just heard a conversation between Thomas and Tomasz.
Marzena: Yes, same name but different languages!
John: When the Polish Tomasz introduced himself, he also said where he was from.
Marzena: That’s right, he said he was from “Silesia," or Śląsk, which is in the south part of Poland.
John: How far is that from Warsaw?
Marzena: It’s about three to six hours away.
John: Is it a nice region? What’s it famous for?
Marzena: It’s known for its mineral and natural resources.
John: How’s the food there? That’s the most important question when asking about a place!
Marzena: It’s great! It’s known for good food, such as kluski, a type of dumpling.
John: What’s the landscape like there?
Marzena: It has some beautiful mountains. I also recommend the town Opole, as it has some amazing canals and a lovely city square.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: prawda [natural native speed]
John: truth
Marzena: prawda[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: prawda [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: mieć [natural native speed]
John: to have
Marzena: mieć[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: mieć [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: Śląsk [natural native speed]
John: Silesia
Marzena: Śląsk[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: Śląsk [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: Katowice [natural native speed]
John: Katowice
Marzena: Katowice[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: Katowice [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: niedługo [natural native speed]
John: soon
Marzena: niedługo[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: niedługo [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: szkolenie [natural native speed]
John: training
Marzena: szkolenie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: szkolenie [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: naprawdę [natural native speed]
John: really
Marzena: naprawdę[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: naprawdę [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: świetnie [natural native speed]
John: excellently
Marzena: świetnie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: świetnie [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Marzena: mieć na imię
John: Meaning "to be called." Can you break this phrase down and tell us what each word means?
Marzena: Sure. Mieć means "to have," while imię is "first name." The word in the middle is a preposition meaning “for.”
John: When do we use this phrase?
Marzena: We use it when we meet someone and want to give them our name.
John: As it means “first name,” can we use it to give our surname?
Marzena: No, you can’t. To do that you should say either nazywam się or jestem.
John: Can you give us an example using our original phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Mam na imię Ewa.
John: ...which means "My name is Ewa."
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Marzena: naprawdę
John: Meaning "really." What can you tell us about this word?
Marzena: Actually, this is made of two words. First is the preposition na.
John: This means “on” or “for.”
Marzena: Second is the noun prawda, meaning "truth."
John: When do we use this word?
Marzena: You can use it to check things. Although I broke it down into two words, remember that it’s actually one word.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Naprawdę nie chcesz tam iść?
John: ..which means "Really? You don't wanna go there?"
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Marzena: a
John: Meaning "and." How can we use this word in Polish?
Marzena: It can be used at the start of a sentence, or in the middle.
John: Does it need a comma when writing it, if it’s in the middle?
Marzena: Yes, it does. The comma should go before.
John: What function does it serve at the start of a sentence?
Marzena: At the start, it can be used to change a topic. In the middle, it connects two parts of the sentence. We don’t use it to connect nouns.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Kasia lubi lody, a Marysia czekoladę.
John: ...which means "Kasia likes ice creams and Marysia likes chocolate."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn some discourse tactics, such as asking for specification, clarification, and confirmation.
John: Usually, there are some set phrases you can use to ask for clarification and so on. So Marzena, can you give us a few examples?
Marzena: Sure! You can say Poważnie? To super!
John: “Seriously? That’s great!”
Marzena: Or To nie może być prawda!
John: “This cannot be true!”
Marzena: Both of those sentences show surprise at the news, but the second one is negative.
John: Are these phrases, plus the extra ones in the lesson notes, good to use in all circumstances?
Marzena: These are informal, so they shouldn’t be used in business settings. In that case, you should make them more formal.
John: You may have learned before that by making sentences third person, they become more polite and formal.
Marzena: That’s right! So you’d say something like Może mi pan podać więcej szczegółów?
John: “Can you give me some more details, sir?” Next, let’s look at some prepositions.
Marzena: Some prepositions have short and long versions. For example, z and ze, or w and we.
John: The first is used with the genitive case, and the second with the locative case. Why are there two versions?
Marzena: It’s because over time, some weak vowels disappeared from words. So, if the noun begins with a group of consonants, we use the longer versions, ze or we.
John: So if there’s one consonant, use the short version. If there are two or more, use the long version.
Marzena: There are exceptions and times when you can use either. But, that’s a good, general rule to follow.
John: Let’s hear some examples.
Marzena: On podróżuje ze wschodu na zachód.
John: “He travels from the east to the west.”
Marzena: Przede wszystkim to nie możesz tak mówić.
John: “First of all, you cannot talk like that.”
Marzena: One thing that’s difficult for all Polish learners is Polish spelling.
John: Is there a particular mistake that people often make?
Marzena: Yes, one common mistake is writing the particle nie, meaning “not,” with the following word instead of separately, or the other way around.
John: Oh, so writing it separately when it should be joined, or writing it joined when it should be separate.
Marzena: Yes. There are some exceptions, but generally, we always write nie separately from the adverb when the adverb comes from an adjective and is in the comparative or superlative form.
John: Let’s hear two examples. One joined, and one not joined.
Marzena: Okay. Trochę się uczyłem, ale niedostatecznie.
John: “I studied a little bit, but not enough.”
Marzena: Nie najmądrzejszy ten twój przyjaciel.
John: “Your friend is not the brightest.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

16 Comments

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PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Have you ever been to Silesia or Katowice? Tell us in Polish!

PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 09:09 PM
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Cześć Linda,


Cieszymy się, że podoba Ci się nasza lekcja. Dziękujemy za dobrą opinię!

Jeśli masz jakieś pytania, daj znać w komentarzu.


Pozdrawiam,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Linda
Sunday at 07:05 PM
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To jest bardzo dobre wyjasnianie .Ucze sie Polskiego przez rok na uniwerstecie,ale te wyjasnianie jest najlepszy .Podziekuje za dobre teksty.

PolishPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 07:13 AM
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Cześć Justin,


Masz rację, czasami mamy drobne błędy.

You can hear both "mi również" and "to skąd jesteś" in casual, everyday speech.


Best,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Justin Napierala
Thursday at 07:02 PM
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He also doesn't say "to skąd jesteś" just "skąd jesteś" although I'd say the latter is correct not the first.

Justin Napierala
Thursday at 06:58 PM
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He doesn't say "mi" in the dialogue when saying milo mi cię wreszcie poznać. I've been noticing quite a bit of mistakes like this in the lessons. Also shouldn't it be mnie również not mi również?.

PolishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 03:43 AM
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Cześć Jozef,


To wspaniale!

Czy podobało Ci się na Śląsku?


Sincerely,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Jozef Mankowski
Sunday at 02:03 AM
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Tak, byłem na Ślasku! Ale konkretnie w Zabrzu. Kilka lat teme, kiedy byłem w Myslenicach, (byłem tam jako nauczyciel) Miałem wielu przyjacioł którzy mieszkają tam.


Jozef

PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 09:55 PM
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Cześć John McMahon,


You are right, in general, when strangers talk in Polish, then use formal language. However, Tomasz and Thomas seem to be at the same or similar age, so they tend to speak informal language.


Sincerely,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

John McMahon
Tuesday at 02:43 AM
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Is it really correct to say (as above):


"The speakers are strangers, so they’ll speak informal Polish"


Wouldn't strangers use formal Polish?


Regards


John

PolishPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 01:55 AM
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Cześć Bryant,


You have a traveler's soul 😉

Just a small hint - we rather say "na Śląsku".


Keep learning Polish!


Sincerely,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com