Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 19 - Are You Getting Enough Exercise in Poland? John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the imperfective. The conversation takes place in a coffee shop.
Marzena: It's between Ann and Thomas.
John: The speakers are friends; therefore, they’ll speak informal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Thomas: Wiesz Aniu, ja mieszkałem kiedyś w Nowym Jorku.
Ania: Naprawdę?
Thomas: Tak, pracowałem dla firmy Polsko-Amerykańskiej. W każdy weekend jeździłem gdzieś na wycieczkę. Codziennie chodziłem na siłownie i jeździłem na rowerze.
Ania: To czemu przestałeś?
Thomas: Nie wiem, teraz codziennie jeżdżę samochodem, ale czasem chodzę na spacery. O wiem, jutro pojadę na wycieczkę rowerową!
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Thomas: You know, Ann, I used to live in NY.
Ann: Really?
Thomas: Yes, I worked for a Polish-American company. Every weekend I went somewhere for a trip. Every day I went to a gym and I used to ride a bicycle.
Ann: Then why did you stop?
Thomas: I don't know. Now I drive a car every day, but sometimes I go for a walk. Oh, I know, tomorrow I will go for a bicycle trip.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: It sounds like Thomas had a very active life when he lived in New York.
Marzena: Yes, and from Ann’s reaction it sounds like his Polish life isn’t so active.
John: Yes, but he might be changing that now… or at least trying to.
Marzena: It’s good to stay active in your free time.
John: How do people spend their free time in Poland?
Marzena: Well, wages in Poland are still relatively low, so many people can’t afford to take trips in their free time.
John: So do most people stay at home?
Marzena: Yeah, most people use their time to do housework and relax with the TV.
John: What about those that like to be more active?
Marzena: Bicycle trips are popular, as is playing soccer for teenagers.
John: Is there any day that people tend to take off or relax more than others?
Marzena: Most people won’t do housework or other types of work on Sundays, as this is still considered a Holy Day.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: wiedzieć [natural native speed]
John: to know
Marzena: wiedzieć[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wiedzieć [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: Nowy Jork [natural native speed]
John: New York
Marzena: Nowy Jork[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: Nowy Jork [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: naprawdę [natural native speed]
John: really
Marzena: naprawdę[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: naprawdę [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: pracować dla [natural native speed]
John: to work for
Marzena: pracować dla[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pracować dla [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: jeździć [natural native speed]
John: to drive
Marzena: jeździć[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: jeździć [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: siłownia [natural native speed]
John: gym
Marzena: siłownia[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: siłownia [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: pojechać [natural native speed]
John: to go
Marzena: pojechać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pojechać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: wycieczka [natural native speed]
John: tour
Marzena: wycieczka[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wycieczka [natural native speed]
John: And lastly..,
Marzena: rower [natural native speed]
John: bicycle
Marzena: rower[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: rower [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: wiedzieć
John: meaning "to know." What can you tell us about this verb?
Marzena: It comes from the same family as the noun wiedza, meaning "knowledge."
John: When do we use this verb?
Marzena: We use it when we talk about knowing something or being certain about something.
John: Are there any other similar verbs?
Marzena: Yes, don’t get it confused with znać. This can also be translated as “to know,” but means being acquainted with or familiar with someone or something.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Wiesz może, gdzie to jest?
John: ...which means "Do you know by any chance where it is?"
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: pracować dla
John: meaning "to work for." Can you break this phrase down for us?
Marzena: This phrase consists of the verb pracować, "to work," and a preposition dla.
John: This preposition means “for.”
Marzena: You can use this phrase when you’re talking about the company someone is working for.
John: Can you use it when you work for an individual, instead of a company, too?
Marzena: Yes, you can.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Pracuję tutaj już trzeci rok dla firmy zagranicznej.
John: ...which means "I am working for a foreign company here for the 3rd year already."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about the imperfective.
John: As well as tenses, Polish has two aspects - the perfective and imperfective.
Marzena: Other Slavic languages have these too.
John: What do we use the imperfective aspect for? Our listeners might already know this, but a review is never a bad thing!
Marzena: I agree! We can use the imperfective to describe an ongoing, unfinished situation.
John: So it can be used for things like ongoing processes, habitual actions, uncompleted actions, and to show there is no result.
Marzena: So you can say things like Właśnie gotuję.
John: “I’m cooking now.” This is an ongoing process.
Marzena: Nie potrafię rozmawiać i czytać jednocześnie.
John: “I can’t talk and read at the same time.” These are simultaneous actions.
Marzena: Zawsze jadę do szkoły autobusem.
John: “I always go to school by bus.” This is a repeated action.
Marzena: Codziennie rano uprawiam jogę
John: “I do yoga every morning.” This is an habitual action.
Marzena: We usually use the imperfective form to make the perfective, but there are some verbs where this process is reversed.
John: So, we make the imperfective from the perfective form.
Marzena: Yes. An example of this is the perfective spotkać and the imperfective spotykać.
John: They both mean “to meet.” There are further examples in the lesson notes. Next, let’s look at compound adjectives. In English, we use a hyphen to string words together, like the word “Polish-American.”
Marzena: This isn’t as straightforward in Polish. For the first word, we use the adverbial form of the adjective, which ends in -o.
John: Can you give us an example of this?
Marzena: For example, biały becomes biało.
John: They both mean “white.”
Marzena: Then we add the hyphen, like in English, and add the latter part. If we want to change the gender or case, we have to change the latter part.
John: Let’s hear an example. How about “sweet and sour?”
Marzena: The individual words are słodki and kwaśny. Together, they become słodko-kwaśny.
John: And how about “Polish-German?”
Marzena: The individual words are polski and niemiecki. Together, they become polsko-niemiecki.

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

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How do you usually spend your weekends?