Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 18 - A Catch-22 Situation in Poland. John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn about stating purpose. The conversation takes place at a coffee shop.
Marzena: It's between Ann and Thomas.
John: The speakers are friends; therefore, they’ll speak informal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Thomas: Słuchaj Aniu, mam problem.
Ania: Co się stało?
Thomas: Żeby dostać mieszkanie, potrzebuję zaświadczenia o pracy.
Ania: No, to znajdź sobie pracę.
Thomas: No tak, tylko żeby dostać pracę potrzebuję wizy.
Ania: No dobrze, to czemu nie złożyłeś podania o wizę?
Thomas: Widzisz, żeby dostać wizę potrzebuję pracy...I tak w koło Macieju.
Ania: Nie martw się, jakoś to będzie.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Thomas: Listen, Ann, I have a problem...
Ann: What happened?
Thomas: To get an apartment, I need a certificate that I'm working.
Ann: Then just get yourself a job.
Thomas: Well yeah, it’s just that; to get a job I need a visa.
Ann: Okay then, why didn't you apply for a visa?
Thomas: You see, to get a visa I need a job... And so on...
Ann: Don't worry, it will be all good.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: It sounds like Thomas is in a bit of a catch-22 situation.
Marzena: Yes, he needs a visa to get a job, but to get a job he needs a visa...
John: And then there’s the housing issue too. I hope he can get it sorted.
Marzena: I hope so too.
John: Why are things so complicated?
Marzena: As Poland is a post-communist country, the bureaucracy system is still a bit complicated.
John: It sounds like it! Are there usually long lines for things too?
Marzena: Yeah, if you need important documents, you should be prepared to wait.
John: I can imagine that this is very frustrating for people.
Marzena: It is, especially for entrepreneurs.
John: Are there any other instances of bureaucracy that our listeners should know about?
Marzena: You’re supposed to register the place where you’re staying within 48 hours; although many tourists ignore this when they’re staying in private houses.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: problem [natural native speed]
John: problem
Marzena: problem[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: problem [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: stać się [natural native speed]
John: to happen
Marzena: stać się[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: stać się [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: zaświadczenie [natural native speed]
John: certificate
Marzena: zaświadczenie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: zaświadczenie [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: praca [natural native speed]
John: job
Marzena: praca[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: praca [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: dostać [natural native speed]
John: to get
Marzena: dostać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: dostać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: czemu [natural native speed]
John: why
Marzena: czemu[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: czemu [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: wiza [natural native speed]
John: visa
Marzena: wiza[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wiza [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: koło [natural native speed]
John: wheel
Marzena: koło[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: koło [natural native speed]
John: And lastly...
Marzena: jakoś [natural native speed]
John: somehow
Marzena: jakoś[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: jakoś [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: czemu
John: meaning "why." What can you tell us about this word?
Marzena: Czemu is actually an accusative form of the interrogative pronoun co, meaning "what."
John: However, it’s used as “why.”
Marzena: It’s a less formal version of dlaczego and is used in less formal settings.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Czemu jesteś taki niemiły?
John: ...which means "Why are you so unkind?"
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: w koło Macieju
John: meaning "in a vicious circle." This is an idiom.
Marzena: First is the preposition w, which means “in.” Next is koło, which is a noun meaning “wheel.” The final word is the proper noun Maciej.
John: The English equivalent for this name is “Matthias.”
Marzena: You use this idiom when an annoying situation keeps happening over and over again.
John: Can it be used in both formal and informal situations?
Marzena: It’s not very informal, but is best used in informal situations.
John: Can you give us an example using this idiom?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, A ty co tak w koło Macieju?
John: ...which means "What, are you stuck in a vicious circle or something?"
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about stating purpose.
John: There are many different ways to state purpose, but in this lesson we’re going to look at one in particular.
Marzena: Yes, we’ll look at żeby. We’ve seen this word before in other lessons.
John: Yes, we’ve used it to make a request and to pass on a message.
Marzena: This time, it’ll be used to state purpose.
John: But it changes forms with different people.
Marzena: Right, for example, with the singular “I” it’s żebym. With the plural “we,” it’s żebyśmy.
John: But we don’t need to know those different forms when stating purpose, do we?
Marzena: Nope, we just need żeby followed by an infinitive.
John: Let’s hear some examples.
Marzena: Przyjechałem tu, żeby trochę zarobić.
John: “I came here in order to earn money.”
Marzena: Co trzeba zrobić, żeby dostać dobrą pracę?
John: “What do you have to do in order to get a good job?” Next, let’s look at indefinite pronouns. These are pronouns that don’t refer to anything in particular. In English they’re words like “someone,” “something,” “sometime,” and so on.
Marzena: To make them in Polish, we add ś to the interrogative. If the interrogative ends in a consonant, then we add oś.
John: So, how do we say “somehow” in Polish?
Marzena: jakoś. That comes from jak. As it ends in a consonant, it gets the oś ending.
John: Okay. And what’s “somewhere?”
Marzena: gdzieś. That comes from gdzie.
John: Indefinite pronouns also include words like “anytime” and “anyone.”
Marzena: To make these, we add kolwiek to the interrogative pronoun.
John: So what is “anyone?”
Marzena: ktokolwiek. That comes from kto.
John: And “anything.”
Marzena: cokolwiek. That comes from co.
John: Let’s finish the lesson with some examples.
Marzena: Nie martw się, jakoś to będzie.
John: “No worries, it will be good somehow.”
Marzena: Masz cokolwiek do pisania?
John: “Do you have anything to write with?”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

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