Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 14 - Have You Lost Your Phone in Poland? John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the past tense. The conversation takes place at a coffee shop.
Marzena: It's between Ann and Thomas.
John: The speakers are friends; therefore, they’ll speak informal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Ania: Co się stało?
Thomas: Chyba zgubiłem mój telefon.
Ania: Ale jak to? Gdzie?
Thomas: Poszedłem na obiad do restauracji. Odpisałem na kilka maili i położyłem telefon na stole.
Ania: No dobrze i co się stało?
Thomas: Wyszedłem na chwilę do toalety. Potem wróciłem, ale telefonu już nie było.
Ania: Wiesz Thomas, nie wiem czy "zgubiłem" to jest najlepsze słowo.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Ann: What happened?
Thomas: I think I've lost my phone.
Ann: Oh how come? Where?
Thomas: I went to have dinner at a restaurant. I replied to some e-mails and put the phone on the table.
Ann: OK, and what happened?
Thomas: I went for a moment to the bathroom. Then I came back, but the phone wasn't there anymore.
Ann: You know, Thomas, I'm not sure if "lost" is the best word.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Yeah, I don’t think “lost” is the best phrase there either.
Marzena: Right. He didn’t lose his phone, as he knows where it was when he last saw it.
John: It sounds more like it was stolen.
Marzena: I think so too.
John: Are things often stolen in Poland?
Marzena: Poland might have a bad reputation, but Poland is a relatively safe country.
John: That’s good to hear!
Marzena: Yes, recently it was reported that Poland is safer than many other popular destinations in Europe.
John: But it’s still not wise to leave your belongings lying around.
Marzena: Yes, don’t do that. Don’t leave your belongings lying around or have your purse open, for example.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: chyba [natural native speed]
John: probably
Marzena: chyba[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: chyba [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: zgubić [natural native speed]
John: to lose
Marzena: zgubić[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: zgubić [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: telefon [natural native speed]
John: telephone
Marzena: telefon[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: telefon [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: ale [natural native speed]
John: but
Marzena: ale[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: ale [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: pójść [natural native speed]
John: to go
Marzena: pójść[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pójść [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: odpisać [natural native speed]
John: to write back
Marzena: odpisać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: odpisać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: kilka [natural native speed]
John: a few
Marzena: kilka[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: kilka [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: położyć [natural native speed]
John: to put
Marzena: położyć[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: położyć [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: wyjść [natural native speed]
John: to go out
Marzena: wyjść[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wyjść [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: chwila [natural native speed]
John: moment
Marzena: chwila[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: chwila [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Marzena: Ale jak to?
John: meaning "But how?" What can you tell us about this phrase?
Marzena: Ale is a particle meaning "but." It’s followed by the pronoun jak.
John: This pronoun means “how.”
Marzena: Then there’s the pronoun to, meaning "this."
John: The whole phrase means “but how.”
Marzena: You can use this informal expression to show your astonishment.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Ale jak to? Co masz na myśli?
John: ...which means "But how come? What do you mean?"
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: na chwilę
John: meaning "for a moment." Can you break this phrase down for us?
Marzena: Na is a preposition that means “on." It’s followed by the noun chwila in accusative case.
John: This means “a moment.”
Marzena: You can use this phrase when talking about an action that will only last for a moment.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Muszę wyjść na chwilę.
John: ...which means "I have to go out for a moment."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about past tense.
John: I’m sure that our listeners have come across the past tense before, even if they haven’t learned how to form it yet.
Marzena: I would imagine so. The good news is that there’s only one past tense in Polish.
John: You can use this past tense to cover both finished and unfinished actions.
Marzena: It’s not difficult, but there are some new forms to learn.
John: What are these new forms?
Marzena: For singular verbs, we usually take the final ć from the infinitive and add -łem, -łeś, -ł for masculine forms, or -łam, -łaś, -ła for feminine forms.
John: What about for the neuter form?
Marzena: We only use it for the third singular, “it," but we add -ło.
John: What about plural forms?
Marzena: We add -liśmy, -liście, -li for masculine personal and -łyśmy, -łyście, -ły for others.
John: Are there any irregular verbs?
Marzena: Yes, there are. Some verbs, like być which means “to be,” and mieć, meaning “to have,” are irregular.
John: The conjugation tables for these are in the lesson notes. Marzena, can you give us some examples?
Marzena: Wczoraj przez 3 godziny czytałem książkę.
John: “I was reading a book for 3 hours yesterday.”
Marzena: Pojechałam nad morze.
John: “I went to the sea.” Next, let’s look at the perfective.
Marzena: Perfective, or aspekt dokonany, may be one of the most confusing topics in Polish grammar. It’s used to talk about a completed action and is used only in past tense.
John: In what kind of situations would we use this aspect?
Marzena: Things such as communicating a result, talking about actions chronologically, one-time actions, completed actions, and expressing a moment.
John: How do you make a perfective verb?
Marzena: By simply adding a prefix to the imperfective verb. There are no clear rules about which prefix to use; you just have to learn them.
John: Let’s go through some examples.
Marzena: Sure. I’ll say the perfective verb, and John will give you the translation.
John: Sounds good.
Marzena: zjeść
John: “To eat.”
Marzena: skończyć
John: “To finish.”
Marzena: przeczytać
John: “To read.” There are more examples in the lesson notes.

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

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What would you do in Thomas’ situation? Tell us in Polish!