Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 13 - Another Day, Another Polish Train Delay. John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the announcements at a train station. The announcement takes place at a station.
Marzena: It's presented by a broadcaster.
John: The speaker is a stranger in an official capacity; therefore, she will speak formal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
prezenterka: Uprzejmie informujemy, że pociąg pośpieszny linii PKP Intercity z Warszawy do Krakowa jest opóźniony o 20 minut.
prezenterka: Jednocześnie informujemy, że wielkość opóźnienia może ulec zmianie.
prezenterka: Za wszelkie utrudnienia serdecznie przepraszamy.
(few seconds break)
prezenterka: Szanowni państwo uprzejmie informujemy, że opóźniony pociąg linii PKP Intercity z Warszawy do Krakowa wjedzie na tor 6 przy peronie 3.
prezenterka: Wagony pierwszej klasy zatrzymują się w sektorach 1 i 2.
prezenterka: Wagon restauracyjny zatrzymuje się w sektorze 3.
prezenterka: Prosimy o przejście do odpowiednich sektorów.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Broadcaster: We kindly inform you that the express train line PKP Intercity from Warsaw to Krakow is now 20 minutes delayed.
Broadcaster: Please also note that the delay can change.
Broadcaster: We are sorry for the inconvenience.
(few seconds break)
Broadcaster: Ladies and gentlemen, we kindly inform you that the delayed train line PKP Intercity from Warsaw to Krakow will arrive at platform 3, track 6.
Broadcaster: First-class cars stop in sectors 1 and 2.
Broadcaster: The restaurant car stops in sector 3.
Broadcaster: Please go to the relevant sectors.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: I know that train delays can be unavoidable, but they’re still very frustrating.
Marzena: They frustrate me too.
John: Are trains frequently delayed in Poland?
Marzena: Unfortunately, yes. Polish trains are pretty famous for being late.
John: That’s not good. It’s worth leaving some extra time then.
Marzena: Yes. It’s also not unusual to hear an announcement that the train platform has changed.
John: Is there much notice of these changes?
Marzena: Not usually. It can be changed just before the departure.
John: Are things improving, though?
Marzena: Yes, they are. Things have been getting better recently, and new tracks are being opened every year or two.
John: Despite the delays and platform changes, do you still recommend taking trains?
Marzena: Traffic can be a problem if you drive, so yes, I recommend taking trains. Especially between Warsaw and Krakow.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: informować [natural native speed]
John: to inform
Marzena: informować[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: informować [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: pociąg pośpieszny [natural native speed]
John: express train
Marzena: pociąg pośpieszny[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pociąg pośpieszny [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: PKP [natural native speed]
John: PKP (Polish State Railways)
Marzena: PKP[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: PKP [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: jednocześnie [natural native speed]
John: at the same time
Marzena: jednocześnie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: jednocześnie [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: ulegać [natural native speed]
John: to be subject to
Marzena: ulegać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: ulegać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: wjechać [natural native speed]
John: to drive in
Marzena: wjechać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wjechać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: tor [natural native speed]
John: track
Marzena: tor[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: tor [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: peron [natural native speed]
John: platform
Marzena: peron[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: peron [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: sektor [natural native speed]
John: sector
Marzena: sektor[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: sektor [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: wagon [natural native speed]
John: car
Marzena: wagon[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wagon [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: informować
John: meaning "to inform." What can you tell us about this verb?
Marzena: informować is part of a bigger word family that comes from English.
John: It does sound pretty familiar.
Marzena: It’s also used with a prefix po-, as a perfective verb.
John: When would you use this verb?
Marzena: You can use it when passing information to people. In less formal situations, you can use powiedzieć, meaning "to say."
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Jeżeli coś się zmieni proszę mnie niezwołocznie poinformować.
John: ...which means "If something changes, inform me immediately."
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Marzena: wjechać
John: meaning "to drive in." This is another verb.
Marzena: Yes, this consists of the prefix w-, which usually indicates an action directed into something, and the verb jechać.
John: That verb means “to drive” or “to go by car.”
Marzena: You can use wjechać when you’re driving into a place by vehicle.
John: Are there any other circumstances when you can use it?
Marzena: It can also be used when a train approaches a platform.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Chyba wjechałeś w złą uliczkę.
John: ...which means "I think you drove in the wrong street."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about announcements at a train station.
John: Announcements like these will use the same key vocabulary wherever you go.
Marzena: That’s right. There are also certain words you’ll need to use when you travel.
John: Let’s go through some of these so that our listeners can use and recognize them as they travel through Poland.
Marzena: First, I’ll say the dictionary form and then the instrumental form. John will give the English translation. So first is autobus and autobusem.
John: These mean “bus.”
Marzena: pociąg and pociągiem.
John: These mean “train.”
Marzena: samochód and samochodem.
John: These mean “car.”
Marzena: taksówka and taksówką.
John: These both mean “taxi.” There are many more modes of transportation and trains in the lesson notes.
Marzena: Speaking of trains, you may need to buy a w jedną stronę or w obie strony ticket.
John: Those are “one-way” and “return” tickets, respectively. What’s the Polish word for “platform?”
Marzena: It is peron. Each peron has two tory.
John: That is the plural for “tracks.” How do we say “to arrive?”
Marzena: That is wjechać. And “to depart” is odjechać.
John: Before we move on, one term our listeners may need to listen out for is “to be delayed.”
Marzena: That is być opóźnionym. Again, there are more examples of key phrases in the lesson notes.
John: Now, let’s move onto ordinal numbers. There are feminine, masculine, and neuter ordinal numbers.
Marzena: Yes. For example, we use feminine numbers when talking about hours. For tracks or platforms, we use masculine numbers.
John: Let’s go over one to ten. Can you give us these numbers, in the order of feminine, masculine, and then neuter?
Marzena: Of course.
John: “First”
Marzena: pierwsza, pierwszy, pierwsze
John: “Second”
Marzena: druga, drugi, drugie
John: “Third”
Marzena: trzecia, trzeci, trzecie
John: “Fourth”
Marzena: czwarta, czwarty, czwarte
John: “Fifth”
Marzena: piąta, piąty, piąte
John: “Sixth”
Marzena: szósta, szósty, szóste
John: “Seventh”
Marzena: siódma, siódmy, siódme
John: “Eighth”
Marzena: ósma, ósmy, ósme
John: “Ninth”
Marzena: dziewiąta, dziewiąty, dziewiąte
John: “Tenth”
Marzena: dziesiąta, dziesiąty, dziesiąte
John: The lesson notes have the ordinal numbers from eleventh to twentieth as well as the plural forms.
Marzena: Shall we finish with some example sentences?
John: I think we should!
Marzena: Polska biegaczka była trzecia.
John: “The Polish runner came third.”
Marzena: Pierwsi ludzie pojawili się tutaj około miliona lat temu.
John: “The first people came here around one million years ago.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

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What form of transportation do you usually choose? Tell us in Polish!