Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 12 - Visiting the Dentist in Poland. John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the imperative. The conversation takes place at the dentist’s office.
Marzena: It's between a dentist and Mark.
John: The speakers are strangers in a customer service context; therefore, they’ll speak formal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
dentystka: Dzień dobry. Proszę, proszę. Co się dzieje?
Marek: Boli mnie ząb, chyba ósemka. Poza tym chciałbym poprosić o przegląd.
dentystka: Proszę usiąść. Proszę otworzyć usta. Tak, tak... To ósemka. Od kiedy pana boli?
Marek: Od dwóch dni.
dentystka: No nie wygląda to najlepiej. Trzeba będzie wyrwać.
-a few minutes later -
dentystka: Proszę zażywać te tabletki. Dwie po trzy razy dziennie. Jeżeli nie przestanie pana boleć to trzeba będzie je zmienić.
Marek: Dziękuję bardzo. Już mi lepiej.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Dentist: Good morning. Please, come in. What's happening?
Mark: I have a toothache, maybe the eighth one. And I would also like you to just check my teeth.
Dentist: Sit down please. Open your mouth. Yes, yes... It's eight. It’s been hurting since when?
Mark: Since two days ago.
Dentist: Well, it does not look too good. We will have to take it out.
-a few minutes later -
Dentist: Take these pills, please. Two (pills), three times a day. If the pain does not stop, we will have to change them.
Mark: Thank you so much. I feel better already.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: I guess that the good news is that Mark knows what’s wrong.
Marzena: The bad news is that he has to have a tooth removed.
John: The pain has been eased by pills though.
Marzena: I don’t think that many people in Poland take actual medication for their pain or illnesses, though.
John: They just suffer through it?
Marzena: No, people often take homemade medications instead of stronger medicines.
John: What kind of medications would people take?
Marzena: For example, for colds, Polish people may eat a lot of garlic or drink onion juice with honey or herbal teas.
John: So people do that instead of going to the doctor?
Marzena: That’s right. You can also buy medication in small bags in shops and supermarkets.
John: What do you do with that type of medication?
Marzena: Mix it with hot water and drink it before bed, as it can make you sleepy.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: dziać się [natural native speed]
John: to happen
Marzena: dziać się[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: dziać się [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: boleć [natural native speed]
John: to hurt
Marzena: boleć[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: boleć [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: ząb [natural native speed]
John: tooth
Marzena: ząb[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: ząb [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: ósemka [natural native speed]
John: eight tooth, wisdom tooth
Marzena: ósemka[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: ósemka [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: wyglądać [natural native speed]
John: to look
Marzena: wyglądać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wyglądać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: zażywać [natural native speed]
John: to take
Marzena: zażywać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: zażywać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: jeżeli [natural native speed]
John: if
Marzena: jeżeli[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: jeżeli [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: zmienić [natural native speed]
John: to change
Marzena: zmienić[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: zmienić [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Marzena: Co się dzieje?
John: meaning "What is happening?" What can you tell us about this phrase?
Marzena: First is the interrogative pronoun co, which means “what.” Then it’s followed by the reflexive verb dziać się.
John: This means “to occur” or “to be happening.” So the whole phrase means “what is happening?”
Marzena: You can use this phrase to ask someone what’s wrong with him or her.
John: I noticed that the second and third words are the opposite way around.
Marzena: That’s right. In this phrase, it’s się dzieje.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Monika, co się dzieje?
John: ...which means "What is happening, Monica?"
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: Nie wygląda to najlepiej...
John: meaning "It does not look too good..." Can you break this phrase down for us?
Marzena: First is the verb wyglądać in negative form.
John: This means “to look.”
Marzena: Last is the superlative form of the adverb dobrze.
John: This means “well.”
Marzena: You can use this to say that something doesn’t look too good.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Nie chcę być negatywny, ale nie wygląda to najlepiej.
John: ...which means "I don't want to be negative, but it does not look too good."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about imperatives.
John: How do we make the formal imperative in Polish?
Marzena: To make a polite but strong imperative, you add proszę to the dictionary form.
John: That word means “please.” How do you ask someone not to do something?
Marzena: The same way you usually make things negative - by using nie. This goes between proszę and the verb.
John: Okay, let’s hear some examples.
Marzena: Proszę tutaj podpisać.
John: “Sign here please.”
Marzena: Proszę się uspokoić.
John: “Calm down, please.” Now, let’s look at the informal imperative.
Marzena: To make the informal imperative, you take the third person singular form and drop the -e, -ie, -y, -i or add -j to the final -a. Remember that the soft stem -dzi changes into -dź.
John: Both the informal and formal imperatives are strong, so what’s the difference between them?
Marzena: You can use the formal imperative with strangers or people you don’t know very well. The informal can be used with family and friends.
John: Okay. It’s time for some examples.
Marzena: Pzynieś mi gazetę.
John: “Bring me a newspaper.”
Marzena: Posprzątaj tutaj.
John: “Clean here.”
Marzena: Finally, let’s look at trzeba, which means “have to," and some other verbs in a special group.
John: These verbs are special because they don’t change their form or have infinitives.
Marzena: In addition to trzeba, there’s also wolno and warto.
John: These mean “it’s permitted to” and “it is worth," respectively. There are others listed in the lesson notes.
Marzena: All of these verbs are followed by infinitives. Such as Tutaj nie można palić.
John: “One cannot smoke here.”
Marzena: Chyba warto jest tam pojechać.
John: “It seems like it’s worth going there.”
Marzena: Trzeba tutaj posprzątać.
John: “Here has to be cleaned.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

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