Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 11 - Do You Need to See a Polish Dentist Urgently? John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to express desire. The conversation takes place on the phone.
Marzena: It's between Mark and a receptionist.
John: The speakers are strangers in a customer service context; therefore, they’ll speak formal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Marek: Dzień dobry. Chciałbym umówić się na wizytę do dentysty.
recepcjonistka: Na kiedy chciałby się pan umówić?
Marek: Czy pan doktor przyjmuje w niedzielę?
recepcjonistka: Niestety nie. Pan doktor przyjmuje od poniedziałku do soboty w godzinach od 9 do 15.
Marek: To może w poniedziałek. To bardzo pilne. Może 9?
recepcjonistka: Przykro mi, ale o 9 już mamy pacjenta. Mogę spróbować umówić pana na 10.
Marek: Naprawdę? Byłbym bardzo wdzięczny.
recepcjonistka: W takim razie czekamy na pana o 10 w poniedziałek. Czy mogę prosić o pana dane?
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Mark: Good morning. I would like to make an appointment for the dentist.
Receptionist: For when would you like to book it?
Mark: Does the doctor work on Sunday?
Receptionist: Unfortunately no. The doctor works from Monday till Saturday from 9 to 3.
Mark: Then Monday maybe. It's very urgent. Maybe 9?
Receptionist: I'm sorry but we already have a patient coming at 9:00. I can try to arrange an appointment for 10.
Mark: Really? I would be really grateful.
Receptionist: Then we will be waiting for you, sir, at 10 am on Monday. May I have your name please?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Ah, dentists. Everybody loves going to the dentist.
Marzena: People might not like it, but it has to be done!
John: That’s true. What’s healthcare like in Poland?
Marzena: Sadly, it still needs major improvements.
John: Is healthcare free in Poland?
Marzena: There are public clinics and hospitals that offer treatment for free, but have long waiting lists. It’s not unheard of to wait for months or even years.
John: Wow! Is there a private system too, where people can pay for better and faster service?
Marzena: Yes, there is. There usually aren’t waiting lists at private hospitals.
John: Other than long waiting lists, is the level of healthcare good in Poland?
Marzena: Yes, it’s really good. Actually, Poland has become a popular destination for medical tourism.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: umówić się [natural native speed]
John: to make an appointment
Marzena: umówić się[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: umówić się [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: kiedy [natural native speed]
John: when
Marzena: kiedy[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: kiedy [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: niestety [natural native speed]
John: unfortunately
Marzena: niestety[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: niestety [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: pilny [natural native speed]
John: urgent
Marzena: pilny[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pilny [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: spróbować [natural native speed]
John: to try
Marzena: spróbować[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: spróbować [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: pacjent [natural native speed]
John: patient
Marzena: pacjent[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pacjent [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: wdzięczny [natural native speed]
John: grateful
Marzena: wdzięczny[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wdzięczny [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: czekać [natural native speed]
John: to wait
Marzena: czekać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: czekać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: dane [natural native speed]
John: data
Marzena: dane[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: dane [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: taki [natural native speed]
John: such
Marzena: taki[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: taki [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: niestety
John: meaning "unfortunately." What can you tell us about this word?
Marzena: This word consists of the prefix nie-, which is a negation, preceding stety.
John: What does that end part mean?
Marzena: It’s not a real word. It comes from the verb stać, "to stand," in the imperative form.
John: How do you use this word?
Marzena: You can use it in the same way as the English “unfortunately.”
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Niestety nie mogę się z tobą dzisiaj spotkać.
John: ...which means "Sadly, I cannot meet with you today."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: być wdzięcznym
John: meaning "to be thankful." There are two words in this phrase. Can you explain what they mean?
Marzena: First is the copula być, meaning "to be." The second word, wdzięcznym, is an adjective.
John: This means “thankful” or “grateful.”
Marzena: It’s in the instrumental case.
John: What can you use this phrase for?
Marzena: You can use it to express your gratitude.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Jestem ci bardzo wdzięczna za pomoc.
John: ...which means "I'm really grateful for your help."
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Marzena: w takim razie
John: meaning "in that case." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Marzena: First is w, which is a pronoun meaning “in.” This is followed by the pronoun taki.
John: This means “such a.”
Marzena: Finally is the noun raz, which can mean “once,” but here means “case.”
John: When do you use this phrase?
Marzena: You can use this when you want to suggest a different idea or solution.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, W takim razie chodźmy gdzieś indziej.
John: ...which means "In that case, let's go somewhere else."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about expressing desire.
John: Let’s take a look at conditionals. We’re calling them conditionals, but it’s closer to sentences using “would.”
Marzena: The conditional mood in Polish is made by adding the particle by to the past tense of the verb.
John: The form of this particle changes depending on the person; it isn’t affected by gender.
Marzena: For example, the past tense singular “I” is bym. The past tense plural “we” is byśmy.
John: There are more forms in the lesson notes.
Marzena: Remember that each one follows a verb in past tense.
John: Let’s hear some sentence examples.
Marzena: Poszłabym, ale nie mogę.
John: “I would go, but I can’t.”
Marzena: Poszedłbym na koncert, ale nie mam czasu.
John: “I would go for a concert, but I don’t have time.”
Marzena: You can also use by after the conjunctions gdy and jeśli or jeżeli.
John: These mean “when” and “if,” respectively.
Marzena: In these cases, it becomes a typical conditional sentence.
John: You can use it to talk about something that cannot happen or to talk about the past.
Marzena: The second part of the sentence has to be with a past tense verb, followed by by.
John: Again, let’s hear some examples.
Marzena: Gdybym był bogaty, kupiłbym dom.
John: “If I were rich, I would buy a house.”
Marzena: Nie spóźnilibyśmy się, gdybyś przyjechał na czas.
John: “We wouldn’t have been late if you had come on time.” Finally, let’s look at some phrases we can use to show sympathy or refuse in a polite way.
Marzena: Przykro mi, ale dzisiaj nie mogę.
John: “I’m sorry but I can’t today.”
Marzena: Słyszałam co się stało. Niezmiernie mi przykro.
John: “I’ve heard what happened. I’m terribly sorry.”
Marzena: Obawiam się, że nie dam rady.
John: “I’m afraid that I won’t be able to make it.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

3 Comments

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PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Have you ever made a phone call in Polish?

PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 09:42 PM
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Cześć Thomas,


Thank you very much for your kind words.

We will be more than happy to help you learn Polish.


Try to use even a few words in Polish in your comments to learn faster! 😎


Pozdrawiam,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

drtom drtom
Monday at 01:01 PM
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No I have never made a phone call in Polish, and you will note my comment is submitted in English. I am working up the courage (and expertise with you to help me) to take a shot at it.

I am very impressed with, and I enjoy the exposure to, your teaching system.

Thomas