Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 10 - Experiencing Bad Service in Poland. John here.
Marzena: Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, we’ll review interrogative pronouns. The conversation takes place at a restaurant.
Marzena: It's between Monica and a waiter.
John: The speakers are strangers in a customer service context; therefore, they’ll speak formal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Monika: Czy w tej kawiarni sama mam się obsłużyć?
kelner: Już do pani idę.
Monika: I gdzie mam położyć torebkę?
kelner: Zaraz dostawię jeszcze jedno krzesło.
Monika: Nie trzeba. Poradzę sobie. Kiedy wreszcie przyjmie pan zamówienie?
kelner: Już do pani idę, tylko zaniosę tę tacę.
Monika: Nie do wiary, tyle czekania. Kto tu jest menedżerem?
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Monica: Should I serve myself in this coffee shop?
Waiter: I will be at your table in a minute.
Monica: And where should I put my bag?
Waiter: I will bring you another chair in a second.
Monica: There is no need to do so. I can handle it myself. When will you finally take my order?
Waiter: I’ll be right there in a moment, just need to put this tray away.
Monica: Unbelievable. So much waiting. Who is the manager here?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Monica was not very happy about waiting.
Marzena: No, she was getting a little frustrated by the end.
John: She did seem to be waiting for a lot of things though.
Marzena: Yeah. Customer service in Poland is good, but still not perfect.
John: Do you have any recommendations for getting good service?
Marzena: I would advise calling the waiter over; otherwise, you might be waiting for some time.
John: Okay, thanks for that advice. Is it common to tip in Poland?
Marzena: Yes, it is. 10 up to 15% on top of the bill is pretty common.
John: How can you ask to order?
Marzena: You can say Przepraszam, czy mogę złożyć zamówienie?
John: Which means "Excuse me, can I order?"
Marzena: Yes, you can use that when you call the waiter over.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: kawiarnia [natural native speed]
John: coffee shop
Marzena: kawiarnia[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: kawiarnia [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: obsłużyć się [natural native speed]
John: to serve oneself
Marzena: obsłużyć się[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: obsłużyć się [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: juź [natural native speed]
John: already
Marzena: juź[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: juź [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: zaraz [natural native speed]
John: soon
Marzena: zaraz[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: zaraz [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: przyjąć [natural native speed]
John: to accept
Marzena: przyjąć[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: przyjąć [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: trzeba [natural native speed]
John: must
Marzena: trzeba [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: trzeba [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: poradzić sobie [natural native speed]
John: to manage
Marzena: poradzić sobie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: poradzić sobie [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: zanieść [natural native speed]
John: to carry
Marzena: zanieść[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: zanieść [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: taca [natural native speed]
John: tray
Marzena: taca[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: taca [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: wiara [natural native speed]
John: faith
Marzena: wiara[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wiara [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Marzena: Nie trzeba.
John: Meaning "There is no need." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Marzena: This is the negative form of trzeba, which means “must” or “have.”
John: It means “it is not necessary.”
Marzena: Yes, or “there is no need to.”
John: When can you use this phrase?
Marzena: You can use it to say that something doesn’t need to be done, in a short and simple way.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Oj nie trzeba, nie trzeba.
John: ...which means "Oh there is no need, really."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: przyjąć zamówienie
John: meaning "to take an order." Can you break this phrase down for us?
Marzena: Sure, przyjąć is a verb that means “to accept.” The second word, zamówienie, is a noun.
John: It means “order” in the accusative case.
Marzena: So the whole phrase means “to take an order.”
John: When’s this phrase usually used?
Marzena: It’s often used by waiters in a restaurant, as it’s a polite way to ask for an order.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Kto przyjął pani zamówienie?
John: ...which means "Who took your order?"
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena: Nie do wiary.
John: Meaning "unbelievable." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Marzena: This is a set phrase. First is the negative particle nie, and then the preposition do.
John: This means “to.”
Marzena: And finally is the noun wiary.
John: This means “faith.” Literally, it’s “not to faith,” or “unbelievable.”
Marzena: It can show your disbelief. It’s not an informal saying as such, but should be avoided in really formal situations.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say, Takie rzeczy się dzieją! Nie do wiary!
John: ...which means "Such things happening! Unbelievable!"
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, we'll review interrogative pronouns.
John: By interrogative pronouns, we mean question words such as “what,” “who,” “which,” and so on.
Marzena: Do you want to hear some example sentences?
John: Yes, please!
Marzena: First, kto. Kto jest za to odpowiedzialny?
John: This is a “who” sentence. “Who is responsible for this?”
Marzena: Next, co. Co tu się dzieje?
John: This is “what.” “What is happening here?”
Marzena: Next is gdzie. Gdzie jest ten koncert?
John: “Where.” “Where is this concert?”
Marzena: And kiedy. Kiedy będziesz w domu?
John: “When.” “When will you be back at home?”
Marzena: Some interrogative pronouns change their form depending on the noun, such as który.
John: This is “which.” How do we say “which is yours?”
Marzena: Która jest twoja? Another one that changes is czyj. Czyje to pieniądze?
John: “Whose.” “Whose money is this?”
Marzena: Finally, in this lesson we came across two forms which look very similar at first glance, namely się and sobie.
John: We can use the first of these to make reflexive verbs.
Marzena: That’s right. For example, myję becomes myję się.
John: The first verb means “I wash.” The second means “I wash myself.”
Marzena: się changes forms depending on the case.
John: There’s a table in the lesson notes with the different forms.
Marzena: Siebie is the longer form. Both can be used, but the shorter version is preferred by many.
John: Are there any differences at all?
Marzena: Yes, because sobie has gained another meaning, which can be described as volitive or liberative.
John: So you can use it to mean “for myself.”
Marzena: Right. For example, Kupię sobie coś dobrego
John: “I will buy something good for myself.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Cześć.

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Have you ever tried a coffee shop in Poland?