Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to Polishpod101.com. This is Business Polish for Beginners Season 1 Lesson 4 - Do You Enjoy Your Polish Job? John Here.
Marzena: Cześć, I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about preferences. The conversation takes place at the office.
Marzena: It's between Marek and Karolina.
John: The speakers are co-workers, therefore, they will speak Polish informally. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Marek: I jak poszło spotkanie z klientem?
Karolina: Dobrze. Jest zainteresowany współpracą.
Marek: Ty to lubisz swoją pracę, co?
Karolina: Tak, lubię spotykać się z ludźmi. Na pensję też nie narzekam.
Marek: No cóż, ja za to wolę pracować sam.
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Marek: I jak poszło spotkanie z klientem?
Karolina: Dobrze. Jest zainteresowany współpracą.
Marek: Ty to lubisz swoją pracę, co?
Karolina: Tak, lubię spotykać się z ludźmi. Na pensję też nie narzekam.
Marek: No cóż, ja za to wolę pracować sam.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Marek: And how did the meeting with the client go?
Karolina: Good. He is interested in our services.
Marek: You really like your work, don't you?
Karolina: Yes, I like meeting with people. And the salary is nothing to complain about.
Marek: Well, I prefer to work by myself.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: It’s good to hear that Karolina likes her job.
Marzena: Yes, I bet she works hard at it too.
John: What is Polish work ethic like?
Marzena: Polish people are really hardworking.
John: In what way?
Marzena: They almost always give their all and want the job to be done correctly.
John: Does that mean that they’re willing to work extra hours if needed?
Marzena: Yes, it does. They work extra hours and value a job well done.
John: So, it’s not common for Polish workers to be updating their social media while in the office?
Marzena: Not at all! That would be really rare!
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: pójść [natural native speed]
John: to go
Marzena: pójść [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pójść [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: spotkanie [natural native speed]
John: meeting
Marzena: spotkanie [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: spotkanie [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: klient [natural native speed]
John: client, customer
Marzena: klient [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: klient [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: zainteresowany [natural native speed]
John: interested
Marzena: zainteresowany [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: zainteresowany [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: współpraca [natural native speed]
John: cooperation
Marzena: współpraca [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: współpraca [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: pensja [natural native speed]
John: salary
Marzena: pensja [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pensja [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: woleć [natural native speed]
John: to prefer
Marzena: woleć [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: woleć [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: sam [natural native speed]
John: oneself
Marzena: sam [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: sam [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: I jak poszło ... ?
John: meaning "How did ... go?"
John: Let’s break this phrase down.
Marzena: I means "and." Next is jak
John: This means "how." Finally is the verb meaning "go" in its past tense.
Marzena: Yes, the verb is pójść, and the past tense is poszło.
John: Altogether it means "How did… go?"
Marzena: You can add in what you are talking about or use the phrase as is, if both parties already know the topic.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say... I jak poszedł egzamin?
John: ...which means "How did the exam go?"
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Marzena: pracować samemu
John: meaning "to work by oneself."
John: This is also a phrase.
Marzena: The first word Pracować means "to work." The next word is samemu.
John: This means "by oneself." Altogether, it is "to work by oneself."
Marzena: In the dialogue, sam is used instead of samemu.
John: It has the same meaning.
Marzena: Yes, just remember that sam is masculine and sama is feminine.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say... Nie lubię pracować sama.
John: ... which means "I don't like to work by myself."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to talk about preferences. There are different ways to talk about preferences.
Marzena: The easiest is to use the verb lubić to say that you like someone.
John: Yeah, but I think our listeners probably already know that one, right? Give us something else, Marzena!
Marzena: Okay, okay! In a business setting, you can use zainteresowany for men and zainteresowana for women to say that we are interested in something.
John: Then you can just add a noun after that.
Marzena: Yes, but make sure that the noun is in the instrumental case. Such as On nie był tym zainteresowany.
John: "He was not interested in it."
Marzena: You can also use the verb woleć.
John: You can use this to say that you "prefer" something.
Marzena: To make it more polite, you can add -by to the past tense, as we have done in previous lessons.
John: Then a verb or a noun can follow.
Marzena: The verb is in its infinitive form and the noun is in its nominative case. For example, Wolałbym o tym nie mówić.
John: "I would rather not talk about this."
Marzena: Next, we should talk about the determiner swój.
John: This means "one’s own." It can be quite useful in business settings as you can use it to talk about your CV, company, or department.
Marzena: There are a few rules about using this. Firstly, swój undergoes declination.
John: There is a full table showing this in the lesson notes. Secondly, if it’s used, it means that the subject and owner are the same person.
Marzena: Right, for example Proszę nam wysłać swoje CV.
John: "Send us your CV please." Both the person doing the action of sending the CV, and the person who owns the CV are the same person.
Marzena: So you can use swój. And finally, you can’t use it in nominative case.
John: Let’s look at another example to further illustrate that second point about the subject and owner being the same person.
Marzena: Okay. First a sentence without swój. Maria kocha jej chłopaka.
John: "Maria loves her boyfriend."
Marzena: Now with it. Maria kocha swojego chłopaka
John: "Maria loves her own boyfriend." In that second example, it’s explicit that it is her own boyfriend, whereas in the first example, it could mean that, or it could be used to say Maria loves a different person’s boyfriend.
Marzena: Yes, sometimes swój is interchangeable with the first and second person mój and twój.
John: This word is good in business because it’s not casual, but not overly formal too.

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Do zobaczenia!

7 Comments

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PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Can you write a sentence using the verb lubić?

PolishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 07:32 PM
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Cześć Tory,


Tak, masz rację! 😄


Daj znać, jeśli masz jakieś inne pytania.


Pozdrawiam,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Tory
Friday at 06:44 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ah! Rozumiem!


So, in the dailogue, Marek was comparing his preference to Karolina's preference, by

saying that he, instead, prefers to work alone.


Dziękuję za pomoc!

Tory

PolishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 01:55 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Cześć Tory,

Thank you for your question.


"za to" means "instead", or kind of "but".

Please take a look at the another example:

Ty jesteś jeszcze młoda, za to ja jestem matką. - You are still young, but I am a mother.

Please also compare it with the other usage of "za to", that means "because"./ "for that".

W związku z tym nie do przyjęcia jest karanie kobiet za to, że są matkami.- It is therefore unacceptable for women to be penalised because they are mothers.


Best,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Tory
Wednesday at 05:57 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Is there a difference between the example above,

'No cóż, ja za to wolę pracować sam,' and

'No cóż, ja wolę pracować sam'?


I don't understand what 'za to' does for the sentence.


Thanks!

PolishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 10:07 PM
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Hi Eduardo Morales,


That's right, it is a mistake - we use the accusative case with "woleć".


Should you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Eduardo Morales
Sunday at 06:55 AM
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Hi, I think there is a mistake here.


"After woleć (in the specific form, with or without -by), we usually have the verb in its infinitive form or noun in nominative case:"


As far as I understand, after woleć we should use the accusative case. (I am aware that for masculine and neuter is the same)


Example: dziękuję ale ja wolę kawę. ....


Regards,