Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to Polishpod101.com. This is Business Polish for Beginners Season 1 Lesson 3 - Talking About Your Profession in Polish, John Here.
Marzena: Cześć, I'm Marzena.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn about professions. The conversation takes place at the office.
Marzena: It's between Karolina and Marek.
John: The speakers are co-workers, therefore, they will speak Polish informally. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Karolina: Marek, prawda?
Marek: Tak, a ty jak mniemam jesteś Karolina?
Karolina: Tak, miło mi cię w końcu poznać.
Marek: Mnie również.
Karolina: Co ty tak właściwie robisz?
Marek: Jestem księgowym.
Karolina: Księgowym? To znaczy, że zajmujesz się rachunkami?
Marek: Tak jakby, rachunkami, rozliczeniami, podatkami...
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Karolina: Marek, prawda?
Marek: Tak, a ty jak mniemam jesteś Karolina?
Karolina: Tak, miło mi cię w końcu poznać.
Marek: Mnie również.
Karolina: Co ty tak właściwie robisz?
Marek: Jestem księgowym.
Karolina: Księgowym? To znaczy, że zajmujesz się rachunkami?
Marek: Tak jakby, rachunkami, rozliczeniami, podatkami...
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Karolina: Marek, right?
Marek: And you, I presume, are Karolina?
Karolina: It's nice to finally meet you.
Marek: Same here.
Karolina: So what exactly are you doing?
Marek: I'm an accountant.
Karolina: Accountant? So what, you deal with the accounts?
Marek: Well kind of, accounts, billing, taxes...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: In this lesson, Karolina met someone new.
Marzena: Yes, she met Marek, an accountant.
John: How do people in Poland decide what job they’re going to do?
Marzena: In the past, your major was a very important factor in deciding that.
John: So, the major course of study at university.
Marzena: Yes, but Polish people would often choose their major in high school.
John: In high school? That’s a bit early, isn’t it?
Marzena: In high school, classes are divided by majors.
John: Oh right. And things are different now?
Marzena: People often get jobs in things other than their majors.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: mniemać [natural native speed]
John: to suppose
Marzena: mniemać [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: mniemać [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: właściwie [natural native speed]
John: actually
Marzena: właściwie [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: właściwie [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: robić [natural native speed]
John: to take (pictures only), to do, to make
Marzena: robić [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: robić [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: księgowy [natural native speed]
John: accountant
Marzena: księgowy [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: księgowy [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: to znaczy [natural native speed]
John: namely
Marzena: to znaczy [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: to znaczy [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: rachunek [natural native speed]
John: check, bill
Marzena: rachunek [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: rachunek [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Marzena: rozliczenie [natural native speed]
John: settlement
Marzena: rozliczenie [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: rozliczenie [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Marzena: podatek [natural native speed]
John: tax
Marzena: podatek [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: podatek [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena: właściwie
John: meaning "actually."
John: This is an adverb.
Marzena: It comes from the adjective właściwy.
John: This means "the correct one."
Marzena: So it’s usually translated as "actually."
John: How can this be used?
Marzena: In a very similar way to "actually" in English.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say... Właściwie to już skończyłam.
John: ...which means "Actually I have already finished."
John: Okay, what's the next word?
Marzena: tak jakby
John: meaning "as if."
John: This is a phrase.
Marzena: First is tak, and this is usually translated as "yes." The next word, jakby has two parts. First is jak.
John: This means "how"
Marzena: and the next is by, which means "in order to."
John: The whole phrase means "as if," and you can use it to compare things.
Marzena: You can also use jakby alone for the same meaning.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena: Sure. For example, you can say... To tak jakby cię nie było.
John: ... which means "It's as if you weren't here."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about professions. We’re going to look at some Polish words for popular jobs.
Marzena: Even though we have masculine and feminine forms in Polish for some jobs, we just use the same word.
John: So if there are two words, we’ll say the masculine first, then feminine. Let’s get started, shall we?
Marzena: Sure! pielęgniarz, pielęgniarka
John: "nurse"
Marzena: lekarz, lekarka
John: "doctor"
Marzena: programista
John: "programmer"
Marzena: nauczyciel, nauczycielka
John: "teacher"
Marzena: pisarz, pisarka
John: "writer." There are many more examples in the lesson notes. Now, let’s look at how to clarify things in a business setting.
Marzena: You can use To znaczy, że followed by a sentence.
John: The meaning of this phrase is "This means that…"
Marzena: Also Jak mniemam followed by a sentence.
John: This is "As I supposed…" Now, let’s hear an example.
Marzena: Księgowym? To znaczy, że zajmujesz się rachunkami?
John: "Accountant? So what, you deal with the accounts?"
Marzena: To znaczy, że nie uda nam się tego dostać?
John: "Does this mean that we won’t be able to get this?"
Marzena: Jak mniemam, tego nie możemy użyć?
John: "As I supposed, we cannot use this?"

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena: Do zobaczenia!

3 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Let's practice together in the comments!

PolishPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:36 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Cześć Marie,


Thank you for studying with us👍


The usage of future tense in this sentence is natural and it can be translated as "We won't be able to (...)".

The future tense indicates here that no matter what we do we will not get it, there is no way to get it.

You can also say "To znaczy, że tego nie dostaniemy". It is also the future tense, but the sentence is a bit shorter, because we do not add "udać się".

On the other hand, you can't say "To znaczy, że nie udaje nam się tego dostać", or "To znaczy, że nie dostajemy tego" - the present tense makes no sense here, as we are talking about the future effect.


If you need more detailed explanation, please consider subscribing our Premium Plus plan to get access to My Teacher Messenger where you can ask our Polish teachers about anything related to Polish language and culture.


Thanks!


Best,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com


Best,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Marie
Monday at 05:47 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello,

Thank you for those great lessons.

Could you explain the future tense in: "To znaczy, że nie uda nam się tego dostać?"

Best,