Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Betsey:Hello everyone and welcome to PolishPod101.com. This is Beginner series, season 1, lesson 7, Using Polish Numbers – Zero to Ten. I’m Betsey.
Joanna:And I’m Joanna.
Betsey:In this lesson you’ll learn how to count from zero to ten in Polish..
Joanna:This conversation takes place at a cafe.
Betsey:The conversation is between Ewa and Jan
Joanna:They are around the same age, so they’ll be speaking informal Polish.
Betsey:Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Jan:Cześć, Ewa. Chcesz iść jutro do kina?
Ewa:Pewnie! O której?
Jan:Jeszcze nie wiem. Zadzwonię do ciebie. Jaki jest twój numer telefonu?
Ewa:124 365 978. A twój?
Jan:195 334 699.
Ewa:Dzięki.
Alisha: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Jan:Cześć, Ewa. Chcesz iść jutro do kina?
Ewa:Pewnie! O której?
Jan:Jeszcze nie wiem. Zadzwonię do ciebie. Jaki jest twój numer telefonu?
Ewa:124 365 978. A twój?
Jan:195 334 699.
Ewa:Dzięki.
Alisha: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Jan:Cześć, Ewa. Chcesz iść jutro do kina?
:Hi, Ewa. Do you want to go to the cinema tomorrow?
Ewa:Pewnie! O której?
:Sure! What time?
Jan:Jeszcze nie wiem. Zadzwonię do ciebie. Jaki jest twój numer telefonu?
:I don’t know yet. I will call you. What is your phone number?
Ewa:124 365 978. A twój?
:124 365 978. And yours?
Jan:195 334 699.
:195 334 699.
Ewa:Dzięki.
:Thanks.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Betsey:Since we’re on the topic of phone numbers, what can you tell us about mobile phone services in Poland, Joanna?
Joanna:Well, the first services of this kind appeared in Poland in 1992, but of course not many people had enough money to buy a mobile phone, because in those days it was a symbol of high status and wealth.
Betsey:I’m sure that the design of those phones was completely different from what we know now.
Joanna:Yes, we would often compare them to bricks, since they were around the same size and very heavy. Also, to receive a phone call, often the person had to go to some open area, like a hill or a slope!
Betsey:That would’ve been funny to see!
Joanna:Of course, those times are all gone. Now we live in the era of mobile phones, and no-one can imagine life without them anymore!
Betsey:So true! What are the most popular service providers?
Joanna:The first and the biggest one is T-Mobile - formerly known as Era - and also Orange, Heyah, Play and Plus. Heyah and Play are known for the incredibly low prices of their phone calls and text messages.
Betsey:So one option is signing a contract with one of the providers, are there any other options?
Joanna:Yes, there’s are two groups of phone users in Poland - those who sign a contract that is usually for 2 years and after that, when they extend it for another 2 years there’s the chance to get a new phone for approximately 1 PLN. There’s also a pay-as-you-go option, where the users have to buy so-called ‘doładowania’ - “recharges” or “credit” in kiosks, convenience stores, or gas stations.
Betsey:Ok, that’s useful information! Now let’s move on to the vocabulary section.
VOCAB LIST
:Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
:The first word we shall see is:dzwonić [natural native speed]
:call, ring
:dzwonić [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:dzwonić [natural native speed]
:Next:numer [natural native speed]
:number
:numer [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:numer [natural native speed]
:Next:telefon [natural native speed]
:telephone
:telefon [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:telefon [natural native speed]
:Next:zero [natural native speed]
:zero (0)
:zero [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:zero [natural native speed]
:Next:jeden [natural native speed]
:one (1)
:jeden [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:jeden [natural native speed]
:Next:dwa [natural native speed]
:two (2)
:dwa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:dwa [natural native speed]
:Next:trzy [natural native speed]
:three (3)
:trzy [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:trzy [natural native speed]
:Next:cztery [natural native speed]
:four (4)
:cztery [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:cztery [natural native speed]
:Next:pięć [natural native speed]
:five (5)
:pięć [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:pięć [natural native speed]
:Next:sześć [natural native speed]
:six (6)
:sześć [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:sześć [natural native speed]
:Next:siedem [natural native speed]
:seven (7)
:siedem [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:siedem [natural native speed]
:Next:osiem [natural native speed]
:eight (8)
:osiem [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:osiem [natural native speed]
:Next:dziewięć [natural native speed]
:nine (9)
:dziewięć [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:dziewięć [natural native speed]
:And last:dziesięć [natural native speed]
:ten (10)
:dziesięć [slowly - broken down by syllable]
:dziesięć [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Joanna:Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. Joanna, so what’s the first word?
Joanna:‘telefon’
Betsey:“phone”
Joanna:this noun was traditionally used for a landline phone, but nowadays, in the mobile phone era, it’s usually used in the phrase we heard in the dialog – ‘numer telefonu’
Betsey:which means “phone number”.
Joanna:As you’ve probably guessed, we don’t really call a mobile phone a ‘telefon’.
Betsey:so there’s another word for a mobile phone?
Joanna:There is. The full name is - ‘telefon komórkowy’
Betsey:which translates to “cell phone”
Joanna:But, since Poles like making things simple and short, we’d usually just say ‘komórka’
Betsey:which means “a cell”
Joanna:Probably the only places you’ll hear someone say the full name - ‘telefon komórkowy’ - will be administrative offices.
Betsey:Okay, what’s the next word?
Joanna:‘dzwonić’
Betsey:“to call”
Joanna:This is one of these words that have more than one meaning.
Betsey:Ok, so let’s go through them
Joanna:One meaning is “to call someone on the phone”. In the dialogue, Jan said ‘zadzwonię do ciebie’...
Betsey:which means “I’ll call you”
Joanna:This is an action that is supposed to happen in the future - and in these cases we have to add the prefix -za to the main word ‘dzwonić’
Betsey:So “to make a call in the future” in Polish is..
Joanna:‘zadzwonić’
Betsey:What about an action happening at present?
Joanna:Then we just use the form ‘dzwonić’. For example - ‘dzwonię do ciebie od godziny’
Betsey:”I’ve been calling you for an hour”
Joanna:or ‘Dzwonię na policję’
Betsey:“I’m calling police!”
Joanna:the other meaning of the verb ‘dzwonić’ is
Betsey:“to ring”, just like in English. to ring a bell at a hotel lobby or at a door.
Joanna:Exactly. In this case it’s the same as in English.
Betsey:Great! So let’s go to the grammar now.

Lesson focus

Betsey:In this lesson, we’re going to learn about the numbers from zero to ten in Polish.
Let’s start with going through them one by one. Joanna will say each of them, so try to repeat after her.
Betsey:“zero”
Joanna:‘zero’ [pause]…......
Betsey:“one”
Joanna:‘jeden’ [pause]….........
Betsey:“two”
Joanna:‘dwa’.[pause]............
Betsey:“three”
Joanna:‘trzy’..[pause].........
Betsey:“four”
Joanna:‘cztery’.[pause]..........
Betsey:“five”
Joanna:‘pięć’[pause]...........
Betsey:“six”
Joanna:‘sześć’...[pause]........
Betsey:“seven”
Joanna:‘siedem’.[pause]............
Betsey:“eight”
Joanna:‘osiem’..[pause]............
Betsey:“nine”
Joanna:‘dziewięć’..[pause]...........
Betsey:“ten”
Joanna:‘dziesięć’..[pause].............
Joanna:Please be careful when you pronounce “ten” and “nine”. They’re a little bit similar so it may cause some problems. Let’s practice those two once more
Betsey:So “nine” is
Joanna:‘dziewięć’
Betsey:and “ten” is
Joanna:‘dziesięć’
Betsey:In the dialogue Jan asked Ewa about her phone number. How did it sound in Polish?
Joanna:‘Jaki jest twój numer telefonu?’
Betsey:“What is your phone number?”
Joanna:Let’s take a closer look at the components of this question.
Betsey:I recognize the first word...we’ve already learned it, haven’t we?
Joanna:I see you’re a good student! That’s right! We’ve talked about this pronoun. Do you remember when we have to use this one? It’s connected to the gender of the noun it’s asking about.
Betsey:Ahhh.. yes..which one was that? Masculine?
Joanna!:Correct! So the noun in the question ‘jaki jest twój numer telefonu’ is ‘numer’ which is a masculine noun. That’s why the pronoun is in masculine form. Then there’s ‘jest’...
Betsey:...which means “is”.
Joanna:After that we have the possessive pronoun ‘twój’
Betsey:meaning “your”
Joanna:and lastly ‘numer telefonu’, which stands for
Betsey:“phone number”
Joanna:‘Jaki jest Twój numer telefonu?’
Betsey:“What is your phone number?”
Joanna:Now we know how to ask this kind of question. How about an answer?
Betsey:In the dialogue Ewa answered with just her phone number.
Joanna:Yes, that’s the right way to do it. There’s no need to say anything more, just give your phone number. Ok, and here comes the good news.
Betsey:What may that be?
Joanna:Well, Poles usually break up the sequence into single- or double-digit numbers. So if someone asks you for your phone number, simply saying one digit at a time is perfectly fine.
Betsey:That makes things very easy!
Joanna:Since Polish numbers are easy, we hope that you will be able to master them very quickly.
Marketing Piece 7
Betsey:Attention perfectionists! You're about to learn how to perfect your pronunciation.
Joanna:Lesson Review Audio Tracks.
Betsey:Increase fluency and vocabulary fast with these short, effective audio tracks.
Joanna:Super simple to use. Listen to the Polish word or phrase...
:then repeat it out loud in a loud clear voice.
Betsey:You'll speak with confidence knowing that you're speaking Polish like the locals.
Joanna:Go to PolishPod101.com, and download the Review Audio Tracks right on the lessons page today!
Betsey: Okay, that’s it for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone.
Joanna: Do widzenia.

8 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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How many Polish textbooks do you have?

PolishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:17 AM
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Hi Frank L. Johnson,


That's true, Frank. You are well informed.

This mistake has been already reported. Sorry for any inconviencies.


Sincerely,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Frank L. Johnson,
Monday at 03:43 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Currently one Polish Zloty is about one quarter of a US dollar, NOT $4!

PolishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 03:14 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Joshua,


Thank you for posting.

As you probably know, exchange rates often change.

Currently, 1 USD = 3.84 PLN.

It was more than 4 PLN in 2016.


Sincerely,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Joshua
Thursday at 05:15 PM
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Cześć,


In the text it says you can get a phone for 1zł (4$), but 1$ is more like 4zł so I think this is a mistake.


Joshua

PolishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:41 AM
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Cześć @Jacqui i @Naruyuki


To dobrze, że macie polskie podręczniki 👍


Keep learning and let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Naruyuki
Saturday at 02:56 PM
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Mam cztery.

Jacqui
Saturday at 11:44 PM
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Dwa ;)