Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gabriella: Hello everyone and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Absolute Beginner, season 1, lesson 10, Are You Stressing Over Your Polish Driving Test? I’m Gabriella.
Joanna: And I’m Joanna.
Gabriella: In this lesson you'll learn how to talk about dates.
Joanna: This conversation takes place at home.
Gabriella: It’s between Gosia and Alex.
Joanna: The speakers are friends, so they’ll be using informal Polish.
Gabriella: Let’s listen to the conversation.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gabriella: Is getting a driver’s licence in Poland easy?
Joanna: I wouldn’t say it’s easy. First of all, it’s very expensive, especially when you fail the first examination, which happens to most people.
Gabriella: Why is that? Is it because of the difficulty of the exam?
Joanna: Partly yes. The cost increases with every retake of the exam, and then you have to pay again and again…
Gabriella: How long do people practice before taking the exam?
Joanna: It’s 20 hours of theory and from 20-30 hours of driving practice, which includes both driving at the school grounds and in the city
Gabriella: And how old do you have to be to get a driver’s licence in Poland?
Joanna: For smaller vehicles it’s 16, and for regular cars and bikes it’s 18.
Gabriella: Okay, now let’s move on to the vocab.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gabriella: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. Joanna, what’s the first word?
Joanna: This time we’ll start off with a phrase, and it’s ‘prawo jazdy’
Gabriella: “driving licence”
Joanna: ‘prawo’ means
Gabriella: “right, law or claim”
Joanna: then ‘jazdy’ is a genitive form of the noun ‘jazda’
Gabriella: which means “ride or drive”
Joanna: Just a moment ago I mentioned something called the genitive form.
Gabriella: Yes, what’s that?
Joanna: It is one of the grammatical cases, but please don’t worry about it. We will learn about it in the next series, for now just remember..
Gabriella: that “driving licence” is
Joanna: ‘prawo jazdy’
Gabriella: Ok. What’s the next word?
Joanna: ‘dzisiaj’
Gabriella: “today”
Joanna: there’s one more word in Polish that has exactly the same meaning, and it’s ‘dziś’
Gabriella: So we can use either of them?
Joanna: Yes, it’s completely up to the speaker
Gabriella: How would we say “this morning” in Polish?
Joanna: ‘dzisiaj rano’ or ‘dziś rano’
Gabriella: ...and that literally means “today in the morning”
Joanna: Yes, your Polish understanding is amazing!
Gabriella: I’m really proud of myself!
Joanna: I hope our listeners are doing as well as you are!
Gabriella: (laughs) I think we should hear one or two more useful phrases with the words we’ve just learned
Joanna: Okay. So we’ve learned ‘dzisiaj rano’ or ‘dziś rano’. If you want to talk about another time of the day, start with ‘dzisiaj’ or ‘dziś’ and then add the name of time of the day, for example - ‘dziś wieczorem’
Gabriella: “this evening”
Joanna: Then if you want to say that you’ll start something from today, it will be ‘od dzisiaj’
Gabriella: “from today”
Joanna: For more examples, please refer to the notes of this lesson.
Gabriella: Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Gabriella: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about dates.
Joanna: We hope that all of you, have mastered numbers perfectly, listeners!
Gabriella: Because that knowledge will come in handy in this lesson!
Joanna: In the dialogue we heard the question - ‘który dzisiaj jest?’
Gabriella: literally meaning “which day is it today?”, but we’ll stick to the English equivalent, which is “what day is it today?”
Joanna: The components of the question are - the pronoun ‘który’
Gabriella: meaning “which”
Joanna: then ‘dzisiaj’
Gabriella: meaning “today”
Joanna: and lastly ‘jest’, which is the third person singular form of the verb ‘być’
Gabriella: meaning “it is”
Joanna: So altogether we have - ‘który dzisiaj jest?’
Gabriella: “what day is it today?”
Joanna: Answering the question is even easier, because all you have to do is give the date, just like you heard in the dialogue!
Gabriella: Let’s go through the first ten numerals, so that we can practice later a little bit
Joanna: Good idea! As always, everyone, try repeating after me.
Joanna: ‘pierwszy’
Gabriella: (pause) “first”
Joanna: ‘drugi’
Gabriella: (pause) “second”
Joanna: ‘trzeci’
Gabriella: (pause) “third”
Joanna: ‘czwarty’
Gabriella: (pause) “forth”
Joanna: ‘piąty’
Gabriella: (pause) “fifth”
Joanna: ‘szósty’
Gabriella: (pause) “sixth”
Joanna: ‘siódmy’
Gabriella: (pause) “seventh”
Joanna: ‘ósmy’
Gabriella: (pause) “eighth”
Joanna: ‘dziewiąty’
Gabriella: (pause) “ninth”
Joanna: ‘dziesiąty’
Gabriella: (pause) “tenth”
Gabriella: As you can see, all the numerals are based on the numbers we went through in the past two lessons.
Joanna: Please note that all the forms given here are in masculine form.
Gabriella: That’s why they end with the vowel “y”
Joanna: Now, let’s get to know the remaining numerals.
Joanna: ‘jedenasty’
Gabriella: “eleventh”
Joanna: ‘dwunasty’
Gabriella: (pause) “twelfth”
Joanna: ‘trzynasty’
Gabriella: (pause) “thirteenth”
Joanna: ‘czternasty’
Gabriella: (pause) “fourteenth”
Joanna: ‘piętnasty’
Gabriella: (pause) “fifteenth”
Joanna: ‘szesnasty’
Gabriella: (pause) “sixteenth”
Joanna: ‘siedemnasty’
Gabriella: (pause) “seventeenth”
Joanna: ‘osiemnasty’
Gabriella: (pause) “eighteenth”
Joanna: ‘dziewiętnasty’
Gabriella: (pause) “nineteenth”
Joanna: ‘dwudziesty’
Gabriella: (pause) “twentieth”
Joanna: ‘trzydziesty’
Gabriella: (pause) “thirtieth”
Gabriella: Good job, everyone! Now let’s try to answer the question we learned a few minutes ago.
Joanna: ‘który dzisiaj jest?’
Gabriella: “what day is it today?”
Joanna: ‘siódmy’
Gabriella: “seventh”
Joanna: Not that hard, is it!
Gabriella: Just learn the numerals and you’ll be able to talk about dates... fluently!

Outro

Gabriella: Okay, that’s it for this lesson.
Joanna: We hope you enjoyed this lesson, and join us for the next one!
Gabriella: Yes, so be sure to check the lesson notes and we’ll see you next time!
Joanna: Papa.
Gabriella: Thanks for listening, bye!

20 Comments

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PolishPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hello Listeners! Have you ever driven in a foreign country, such as Poland?

PolishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 03:36 PM
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Dzień dobry Benjamin,


Thanks for posting and my apologies for the late reply.


"Szósty is an ordinal number, the equivalent of "sześć".

The Genitive case applies to "grudnia".

If you say "szóstego grudnia" it means that something takes places on that day.

Please compare:


Dzisiaj jest szósty grudnia. - Today is Dec 6th.

Przyjadę szóstego grudnia - I will arrive on Dec 6th.


Hope that helps.


Best,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Benjamin
Friday at 03:40 AM
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Dobry wiezcór.


Building on another's comment, you clarified with the example "Szósty Grudnia" (Dec 6th) as a genitive form, but I'm confused because isn't the genitive form of Szósty: Szóstego, or am I thinking of a different rule?

PolishPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:41 PM
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Well done, Jonathan 👍


Let us know if you have any questions.


Best,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Jonathan
Monday at 05:02 PM
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Ktory dzisiaj jest? drugi😄👍

PolishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:26 PM
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Cześć Larry,


Thank you for posting.

If you want to state that something happened in 1965 you do not divide the year into two numbers, but you read it as a whole instead. So, it would be "w tysiąc dziewięćset sześćdziesiątym piątym roku". However, your explanation with Nominative and Locative also should work. Only be careful with the dates like 2000 ("w dwutysięcznym roku") and for example 2001 ("w dwa tysiące pierwszym roku").


Miłego dnia!

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Larry
Thursday at 01:58 AM
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Cześć Hanna,


Say, for example, that you want to state that something happened in 1965. My understanding is that the “19” would be in nominative case and the “65” would be in locative case (thus locating the event in the year it occurred). However, as you state so well, in real-life conversations one can hear dates expressed in different ways so it’s good to know them. This can be a challenging area for English-speakers and your answers really help.


Miłego dnia!

PolishPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 06:53 PM
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Cześć Gabriel Volpe,


Thank you for posting.


Yes, you're right - we say "szósty grudnia" (Genitive), not "szósty grudzień".

In this lesson, the focus is put on Polish ordinal numbers, and probably this is why the authors of this lesson decided not to complicate it more. By the way, many Poles tell dates without using Genitive, even though it is incorrect, so it is good to know both expressions!


Should you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Gabriel Volpe
Sunday at 10:48 PM
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The lesson says, for example, that "szósty grudzień" means "Sixth December". I guess that's the literal way of expressing each individual word but not how you put them together, is it?


In English, you would say either "Sixth of December" or "December Sixth". Isn't it in Polish "Szósty grudnia"?


Thanks!

PolishPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 05:38 PM
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Hi Larry,


Dziękuję, to miłe!


Dziewiąty (oridinal) sierpnia - to tell dates

Dziewiątego (Genitive) sierpnia - to tell when something takes place, occurs

Can you give us an example with the locative form of numbers?

You can use locative case with the month, for example - "w sierpniu" - to tell when something takes place or happens


Dzisiaj jest dziewiąty sierpnia.

Dziewiątego sierpnia jadę do Chin.

W sierpniu jadę do Chin.


Let us know if you need a more detailed explanation or have other questions.



Best,

Hanna

Team PolishPod101.com

Larry
Tuesday at 04:42 AM
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Cześć. Świetna odpowiedź! Dziękuję bardzo.


Depending on what one wants to say, speaking and writing dates can use ordinal, genitive or locative forms of numbers. I haven’t been able to find consistent information about when each form is used. Could you either give or advise where we could see some examples? Your explanations are always good and make me feel like I’m really learning Polish.