Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hello everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Upper Beginner, Season 1 , Lesson 7: Taking a Trip to the Desert...in Poland! I’m Brandon.
Marzena: And I’m Marzena.
Brandon: In this lesson, you'll learn about the adverbial forms of Polish adjectives.
Marzena: This conversation takes place at a national park.
Brandon: It’s between Tom and Jane.
Marzena: The speakers are friends, so they’ll be using informal Polish.
Brandon: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Jane: Ale tu pięknie!
Tom: Niesamowity widok!
Jane: Chodź szybko! Stąd widać już morze!
Tom: To aż niewiarygodne, że w takim miejscu jest pustynia i wydmy.
Jane: Mówiłam ci, że to fantastyczne miejsce na weekendową wycieczkę.
Brandon: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Jane: Ale tu pięknie!
Tom: Niesamowity widok!
Jane: Chodź szybko! Stąd widać już morze!
Tom: To aż niewiarygodne, że w takim miejscu jest pustynia i wydmy.
Jane: Mówiłam ci, że to fantastyczne miejsce na weekendową wycieczkę.
Brandon: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Jane: Ale tu pięknie!
Brandon: It’s so beautiful here!
Tom: Niesamowity widok!
Brandon: Incredible view!
Jane: Chodź szybko! Stąd widać już morze!
Brandon: Come quickly! You can see the sea from here!
Tom: To aż niewiarygodne, że w takim miejscu jest pustynia i wydmy.
Brandon: It's simply unbelievable that in such a place there's a desert and dunes.
Jane: Mówiłam ci, że to fantastyczne miejsce na weekendową wycieczkę.
Brandon: I told you that it's a fantastic destination for a weekend trip.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brandon: In the dialogue, Tom mentioned an unusual place with a desert and dunes. Where is that?
Marzena: It’s Słowiński Park Narodowy, or in English the “Słowiński National Park.”
Brandon: Where’s it located?
Marzena: It’s in northern Poland, and it’s a UNESCO World Heritage site.
Brandon: That sounds interesting. What can you tell us about it?
Marzena: It’s a huge park that covers an area of 186 square kilometers. The thing that’s the most interesting about this park is that you can see moving dunes there. That’s right - they really move!
Brandon: Hmm, how does that happen?
Marzena: Well, the park is located by the Baltic Sea, so there are often strong winds that move the sand. This results in the dunes moving up to ten meters, or 33 feet, a year.
Brandon: That’s a lot!
Marzena: Exactly! So every time you visit, the park looks different.
Brandon: Listeners, you should add that spot to your must-see list in Poland. Okay, now let’s move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Marzena: pięknie [natural native speed]
Brandon: beautiful, beautifully
Marzena: pięknie [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pięknie [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: niesamowity [natural native speed]
Brandon: incredible
Marzena: niesamowity [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: niesamowity [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: szybko [natural native speed]
Brandon: fast
Marzena: szybko [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: szybko [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: morze [natural native speed]
Brandon: sea
Marzena: morze [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: morze [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: stąd [natural native speed]
Brandon: from here
Marzena: stąd [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: stąd [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: niewiarygodny [natural native speed]
Brandon: unbelievable
Marzena: niewiarygodny [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: niewiarygodny [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: pustynia [natural native speed]
Brandon: desert
Marzena: pustynia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: pustynia [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: wydma [natural native speed]
Brandon: dune
Marzena: wydma [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wydma [natural native speed]
: Next:
Marzena: fantastyczny [natural native speed]
Brandon: fantastic
Marzena: fantastyczny [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: fantastyczny [natural native speed]
: And Last:
Marzena: wycieczka [natural native speed]
Brandon: trip
Marzena: wycieczka [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena: wycieczka [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. Marzena, what’s our first word?
Marzena: Pustynia.
Brandon: Meaning “Desert.”
Marzena: This feminine noun is derived from the adjective pusty.
Brandon: Meaning “empty.”
Marzena: If you need to say that something is desert-like, you can make an adjective from the noun pustynia.
Brandon: And what is the adjective?
Marzena: Pustynny, like in the phrase krajobraz pustynny.
Brandon: Meaning “desert landscape.”
Marzena: The next word is niewiarygodny.
Brandon: “Unbelievable” or “incredible.”
Marzena: If translated as “unbelievable,” niewiarygodny can have a positive and negative meaning.
Brandon: This adjective has more than two meanings, right?
Marzena: Yes. The other meanings are “undependable” and “untrustworthy.”
Brandon: Can you give us some sample sentences with those meanings?
Marzena: Sure. For example, Politycy są niewiarydogni.
Brandon: Meaning, “Politicians are untrustworthy.”
Marzena: Another example is, Dokument bez podpisu jest niewiarygodny.
Brandon: Meaning, “A document without a signature is undependable.”
Marzena: For more details about the noun pustynia and the adjective niewiarygodny, be sure to check out the lesson notes.
Brandon: Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the adverbial forms of Polish adjectives. Adverbs are parts of speech that modify verbs and adjectives. They can also appear in a sentence which doesn’t contain a noun.
Marzena In this lesson, we’ll focus on adverbs formed from adjectives.
Brandon: So we’ll go through the simple rules that will help you master this skill.
Marzena: If you don’t remember adjectives well, be sure to review the Absolute Beginner series, where we talked a lot about this part of speech.
Brandon: Let’s get to the adverb forming rules.
Marzena: Okay. The first group of adverbs are those ending with the vowel -o. They’re formed from basic, short adjectives—usually those which are built from two-syllables and those which have a stem ending with -k, -ch, -c and -g.
Brandon: Let’s give our listeners a few examples. First Marzena will say the adjective and then the adverb that was formed from it, and then I’ll give you the English translation.
Marzena: Here we go: młody, młodo.
Brandon: “Young.”
Marzena: Szybki, szybko.
Brandon: “Fast.”
Marzena: Wolny, wolno.
Brandon: “Slow.”
Marzena: Słodki, słodko.
Brandon: “Sweet.”
Marzena: Another group of adverbs are those ending with the vowel -e. We make them out of adjectives that have a stem ending with a consonant. Moreover, that consonant has to be followed by the letter -n. The consonant then is softened to “ni”, in Polish ni.
Brandon: Let’s go through a few examples.
Marzena: Świetny, świetnie.
Brandon: “Great.”
Marzena: Ładny, ładnie.
Brandon: “Pretty.”
Marzena: Okropny, okropnie.
Brandon: “Terrible, terribly.”
Marzena: There’s one more group of adverbs that end with the vowel -e. To make it easy, just remember this group contains adjectives that don’t fall under any of the rules we’ve discussed thus far. Usually they’re longer words, containing two or three syllables.
Brandon: Does the consonant softening occur here too?
Marzena: Yes, it does. For example, doskonały, doskonale.
Brandon: “Perfect, perfectly.”
Marzena: Wspaniały, wspaniale.
Brandon: “Marvelous, marvelously.” In the notes for this lesson, you’ll find more examples of adverbs, as well as sample sentences. There’s also a table with adverbs related to the weather.

Outro

Brandon: And that’s all for this lesson. Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time. Bye!
Marzena: Bye!
MARKETING PIECE
Brandon: Listeners, looking for a cheat sheet to memorizing Polish vocabulary?
Marzena: Have you checked out our Video Vocab series?
Brandon: These themed video lessons combine visual cues with the voices of native speakers.
Marzena: Just another effective method of learning and retaining thousands of vocabulary words.
Brandon: Go to PolishPod101.com...
Marzena: ...click on the Video Lessons tab...
Brandon: ...and hit play!
Marzena: It’s that easy.
Brandon: But don’t take our word for it.
Marzena: Try it for yourself at PolishPod101.com

7 Comments

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PolishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hi Listeners! Do you like visiting deserts?

PolishPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 10:41 pm
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Hi Clay,


Thank you for your message.


We checked the MP4 file of the lesson download and it seems to be ok.


The MP4 can be downloaded by right clicking on “Download video″ (which you can see written below the video, on the right). Next, just choose “Save link as”, choose the folder in your computer to save the file and then click on “save”. The video will be saved as a .mp4 file.


Could you please try again? If you still have problems, please contact us at contactus@PolishPod101.com.


Cristiane

Team PolishPod101.com

Clay
Tuesday at 2:44 am
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The download link only gives me a "index.php" file.

PolishPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 7:56 am
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Hi Özgür


Thank you for your message. The basic difference between "zobaczyć" and "widzieć" is that one (zobaczyć) is czasownik dokonany (perfect verb that describes the action done) and the other is czasownik niedokonany (imperfect verb - describes the action that is being done).

so best translation would be

zobaczyć - I see (I have seen)

widzieć - I am seeing (I have been seeing)


Let us know in case you have any other questions.


Sincerely

Piotr

Team PolishPod101.com

Özgür
Sunday at 8:41 pm
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hey,

in sample sentances the word "zobaczyć" has been used and literally it means to see i guess. But what is the differences between this word and widzec?

thank you,

PolishPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 12:20 pm
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Hi Sig


Thank you for your message. Word "aż" would be best translated "almost". It usually serves as an elevation of the improbability. With our sample sentence however better translation is "simply" .


Sincerely

Piotr

Team PolishPod101.com

Sig
Sunday at 1:10 am
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what does the Polish word "az" most closely translate to in English? Google translate says it is "up", but that doesn't make sense.

Sig