Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Safe & Secure. We respect your privacy
Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Safe & Secure. We respect your privacy
Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John:
Hello everyone, and welcome back to PolishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 7 - Everyone Has Their Vices in Poland! John here.
Marzena:
Cześć. I'm Marzena.
John:
In this lesson, you’ll expand your vocabulary by changing verbs to nouns. The conversation takes place at work.
Marzena:
It's between Monica and Thomas.
John:
The speakers are co-workers; therefore, they’ll speak informal Polish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Tomasz:
To co? Idziemy na obiad?
Monika:
Daj mi jeszcze chwilkę, wiesz liczenie trochę zajmuje.
Tomasz:
To ja sobie zapalę.
Monika:
Ej, palenie jest niezdrowe!
Tomasz:
Tak samo jak picie.
Monika:
Co masz na myśli?
Tomasz:
Picie coli czy tych innych słodkich napojów.
Monika:
Oj tam, ja codziennie ćwiczę.
Tomasz:
No tak, uprawianie sportu jest zdrowe.
Monika:
Wiesz co jeszcze jest szkodliwe? Gadanie, gdy szefowa próbuje podliczyć twoją pensję.
John:
Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Thomas:
So what? Are we going out for lunch?
Monica:
Just give me a minute. You know counting takes some time.
Thomas:
Then I will just go for a cigarette.
Monica:
Hey, smoking is unhealthy!
Thomas:
Same as drinking.
Monica:
What do you mean?
Thomas:
Drinking Cola or other sodas.
Monica:
Oh well, I exercise every day.
Thomas:
Well yeah, sport is healthy.
Monica:
You know what else is bad for you? Talking to your boss when she is trying to calculate your salary.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John:
There was a bit of lively banter between co-workers in that dialogue.
Marzena:
Right? They seem to have a good working relationship.
John:
What’s the work culture like in Poland?
Marzena:
It’s still going through a period of change.
John:
How’s it changing?
Marzena:
Up until 15 or 20 years ago, it was popular for workers to work from 6am to 2pm.
John:
If that was the regular working shift, when was the lunch break?
Marzena:
There wasn’t a lunch break. That’s why lunch took so long to become part of Polish culture.
John:
What were the meal times then?
Marzena:
After work, so around 2:30 up to 3pm, people would have a hot meal, and then a cold supper later.
John:
And this is changing now?
Marzena:
Yes. In the bigger cities, some companies are offering lunches and brunches now.
John:
Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John:
Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Marzena:
dać [natural native speed]
John:
to give
Marzena:
dać[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena:
dać [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Marzena:
chwilka [natural native speed]
John:
moment
Marzena:
chwilka[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena:
chwilka [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Marzena:
liczenie [natural native speed]
John:
counting
Marzena:
liczenie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena:
liczenie [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Marzena:
zapalić sobie [natural native speed]
John:
to smoke
Marzena:
zapalić sobie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena:
zapalić sobie [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Marzena:
palenie [natural native speed]
John:
smoking
Marzena:
palenie[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena:
palenie [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Marzena:
niezdrowy [natural native speed]
John:
unhealthy
Marzena:
niezdrowy[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena:
niezdrowy [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Marzena:
jak [natural native speed]
John:
how
Marzena:
jak[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena:
jak [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Marzena:
oj [natural native speed]
John:
oh
Marzena:
oj[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena:
oj [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Marzena:
szkodliwy [natural native speed]
John:
harmful
Marzena:
szkodliwy[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena:
szkodliwy [natural native speed]
John:
And last...
Marzena:
pensja [natural native speed]
John:
salary
Marzena:
pensja[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Marzena:
pensja [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John:
Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Marzena:
Daj mi chwilkę.
John:
Meaning "Give me a moment." Can you break this phrase down for us, please?
Marzena:
The verb daj is an imperative form of the verb dawać.
John:
This means “to give.”
Marzena:
The final word is the noun chwilka in accusative form
John:
This means “a moment.” You can use this phrase to ask for more time.
Marzena:
It’s an informal expression, so you should only use it with people you know well.
John:
Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena:
Sure. For example, you can say, Daj mi jeszcze chwilkę pospać.
John:
...which means "Let me sleep for just a moment more."
John:
Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena:
tak samo jak
John:
meaning "same as." What can you tell us about the words in this phrase?
Marzena:
The first word, tak doesn’t mean “yes” in this phrase; it means “so.” When combined with samo, it means “in the same way.”
John:
The three words together mean “the same as.”
Marzena:
Yes, tak samo jak. Jak means “how.”
John:
You can use this phrase to say that two things are similar.
Marzena:
Or, that they’re being done in the same way.
John:
Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena:
Sure. For example, you can say, Zrobiłam to tak samo jak ty.
John:
...which means "I did it the same way as you."
John:
Okay, what's the next phrase?
Marzena:
oj tam
John:
meaning "Oh well." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Marzena:
Oj is an informal exclamation.
John:
It means “oh.”
Marzena:
Tam means “over there.”
John:
Together, it can be translated as “oh, well” or “oh, come on.”
Marzena:
Yes, it shows a level of indifference and should only be used in informal situations.
John:
Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Marzena:
Sure. For example, you can say, Oj tam, nie ma się co przejmować.
John:
...which means "Oh well, you don't have to worry so much."
John:
Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John:
In this lesson, you'll expand your vocabulary by changing verbs to nouns.
John:
If you understand this pattern, it’ll really expand your Polish vocabulary.
Marzena:
Yes, it will! Let’s start with rzeczowniki odczasownikowe.
John:
In English, we call these gerunds.
Marzena:
These change depending on the ending of the verb. For example, verbs that end in -ać, -eć or -ować have a nie ending.
John:
Can you give us an example?
Marzena:
Take, for example, the verb “to read.” That’s czytać. The gerund is czytanie.
John:
The ending of the verb changed, as Marzena explained. There’s a table in the lesson notes with the rules for other verb endings. Now let’s hear some more examples.
Marzena:
Okay. The verb tańczyć is “to dance.” Let’s see it as gerund in a sentence. Tańczenie jest moją pasją.
John:
“Dancing is my passion.”
Marzena:
The verb pić is “to drink.” Again, an example of a gerund sentence is Picie alkoholu może szkodzić zdrowiu.
John:
“Drinking alcohol can harm your health.”
Marzena:
I think we should quickly talk about a different nie - the nie that means “not.”
John:
Sometimes, it interacts differently with comparative or superlative adjectives.
Marzena:
Yes, usually it’s written separately with these types of adjectives.
John:
But with the comparative and superlative forms it becomes a suffix. Take “unhappy” for example.
Marzena:
Right, this would be, nieszczęśliwszy and najnieszczęśliwszy.
John:
That’s “unhappier” and “unhappiest.” Finally, let’s look at how we can talk about something we want to “try” to do.
Marzena:
We can use the verb próbować. This means “to try” or “to taste.”
John:
It can be used with both nouns and verbs.
Marzena:
When used with nouns, it’s always followed by the genitive case. With verbs, it’s followed by an infinitive. It’s also often used in the perfective aspect, becoming spróbować.
John:
Let’s look at some examples.
Marzena:
Spróbuj tego sernika, jest wyśmienity!
John:
“Try this cheesecake; it’s amazing!”
Marzena:
Spróbuj może użyć czegoś innego.
John:
“Maybe try to use something else.”

Outro

John:
Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Marzena:
Cześć.

1 Comment

Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

PolishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

What do you do to maintain your health? Tell us in Polish!